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View Full Version : Folding time: Let's talk about origami


Olli T
06-29-2010, 01:30 AM
For a long time, I've wanted to learn how to make those nifty japanese paper cranes and whatnot. I finally got around to checking if there is any instruction available in my vicinity, but alas, there is not. Not to be deterred, I intend to learn some of these secrets on my own, with a little help from my friend the Internet! Do you have any good origami learning sites or videos in mind? Maybe you already know how to do this and you want to show off? Share your tips and pics in this thread!

Nerdy
06-29-2010, 01:48 AM
I can't say I've ever attempted the Crane, but I can do easy stuff like the blimp, frog, heart, and occassional ninja throwing star. It was fun to hide notes in those, and throw them at some irritating person in middle school.

Tangent Vector
01-29-2013, 09:50 AM
I find it amazing that we have an origami thread and it has gotten this little use... :(

Just this weekend I got the urge to do some folding and so I dug out this Satoshi Kamiya book:
http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/9436/worksofsatoshikamiya.jpg
I was just trying out a few models with cheapo pre-cut origami paper to see what I might want to fold with some of the nicer/larger sheets of handmade paper I've been hoarding. I tried out the "divine boar"/Inoshishigami and found it pretty easy, while the blue whale just didn't come together for me (I can't figure out how the seam along the back is supposed to hold together).

What I hadn't realized was that Kamiya has published a second collected works book:
http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/3027/worksofsatoshikamiya2.jpg
I'm gonna have to get me some of that!

Is there anybody else out there in Tyrant-land who is into this kind of super-complex origami? I'm at the point now where I really need to learn to fold from crease patterns rather than diagrams, but I'm finding the learning curve of that transition pretty hard. For example, I can collapse the crease pattern for Kamiya's Cerberus to its base, but I can't figure out how to proceed from there and do all the detailing. :(

Has anybody out there got experience with "wet folding"? That's another technique that I'd like to learn, so that I can produce models in more robust and display-ready condition. I'm a little bit intimidated about trying it, though.

Guild
01-29-2013, 12:05 PM
http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/5279/foldingtime.gif

Kirin
01-29-2013, 12:38 PM
Those patterns look awesome, Tangent. I did a little origami ages and ages ago, but nothing much more complex than your standard cranes and what-not.

Guild
01-30-2013, 09:19 AM
http://img338.imageshack.us/img338/5660/starburst.gif

http://img46.imageshack.us/img46/527/starburst2.gif

Starburst wrapper art. (https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&newwindow=1&q=starburst%20wrapper&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=xFUJUayUHuaniAKdiYCQBw&biw=1280&bih=654&sei=yVUJUb6UN-LniwLtpoD4CA)

Tangent Vector
02-04-2013, 02:15 PM
In my earlier post I'd mentioned that I was folding the Inoshishigami model from Satoshi Kamiya's first collected works book. When I fold something for the first time, I tend to use cheap paper. This time I used the pre-cut stuff sold as origami paper, which you can get almost anywhere. Here is the boar folded from a 25x25 cm square (excuse my dingy tablecloth):
http://imageshack.us/a/img22/59/inoshishigamismall.jpg

I was happy enough with how that model worked out that I decided to bust out a larger sheet (almost three times longer per side) of some decent-quality hand-made paper, and make a nicer rendition (apologies for the shoddy phone-camera work here):
http://imageshack.us/a/img850/9875/insoshishigamilargefron.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img132/9257/inoshishigamilargeside.jpg

My conscience insists I make one big caveat here, though: I cheated. While both of these models are folded from one uncut square, the nicer one has had a few dabs of glue tucked into important creases to keep it from coming apart.

A real origami artist would instead use the technique of "wet folding," in which the paper is treated with a solution of methylcellulose (a "sizing" agent used in book-binding), and then folded while damp. As the model dries the methylcellulose sets and stiffens the paper (so while it does not glue the paper together, it achieves a similar effect). I haven't learned to use this technique, so my models bend the "rules" or origami a bit. :(

I'll be sure to post in this thread the next time I fold anything worthwhile (so long as nobody objects to my cheating ways...). Any other Tyrant folders out there want to share their work?

namelessentity
02-05-2013, 10:49 AM
I don't make anything that complex, but I really enjoy seeing your work. My general rule to origami is that if I can't easily memorize the steps to a model, I don't really want to make it.

Still, looks wonderful, and I don't care if you had to cheat for presentation. Still going to call you a cheater, however.

Guild
02-05-2013, 11:09 AM
Wow, that is amazing! Good job!

That Old Chestnut
02-05-2013, 04:31 PM
Yeah, that's pretty badass, Tangent!

Traumadore
02-06-2013, 06:37 AM
In printmaking and bookbinding we consider methylcellulose to be a full on glue, sizing agent nothin'! If you're cheating then they're cheating too, perhaps in a slightly more elegant manner.

Have you seen the documentary "Between the Folds"? It's really good, I recommend it. There's one guy in chicago that makes stuff that works like a paper spring. He undoes them and they fold right back up again.

Tangent Vector
02-06-2013, 08:36 AM
Have you seen the documentary "Between the Folds"?
I watched it a while back. I liked it overall, but...

<super-petty gripes follow, you have been warned>

I got a bit annoyed at the way they kind of set up this false dichotomy and portrayed those doing abstract, minimalist, or sculptural work as the Real Artists, while those doing super-technical designs were portrayed as Missing the Point. It probably didn't help that the folders they chose to follow in detail were western—with the exception of the requisite retrospective on Yoshizawa—while the contemporary eastern folders (folks like Hojyo Takashi and my man Satoshi Kamiya) seemed to be hand-waved away as part of a misguided super-technical movement.

The dichotomy is especially silly when you consider some of the fairly technical folds that Robert Lang designs, or the fact that Michael LaFosse worked together with Kamiya to design the paper he uses for his super-technical work. The origami artists themselves don't draw the kind of line I felt the documentary tried to draw.

<okay, done with that>

For anybody who liked that documentary and wants to get more info on the mathematics of origami, Robert Lang's book Origami Design Secrets is a must-have. I honestly can't recommend it highly enough.

Apparently the second edition of the book adds in instructions for some additional models, but cuts out some of the mathematical content. Be sure you know which version you are getting.

Traumadore
02-06-2013, 12:25 PM
Huh, as someone who isn't into origami I didn't really pick up on any value judgments between technical/representational work and the abstract stuff. Especially since they make a point of how the technical understanding has developed explosively in just the past decade. Probably the stuff that wowed me the most was the representational work, like that armadillo with every single plate defined in paper. I cannot fathom how that comes from a single square sheet of paper.

Nodal
02-06-2013, 12:35 PM
The origami artists themselves don't fold the kind of line I felt the documentary tried to draw.

MikeHawkIsLarge
02-06-2013, 12:37 PM
When I proposed to my fiancee I folded a ring box and a paper ring and gave that to her first.

I still think she likes the paper ring better than the real one...

Tangent Vector
02-06-2013, 01:14 PM
Huh, as someone who isn't into origami I didn't really pick up on any value judgments between technical/representational work and the abstract stuff. Especially since they make a point of how the technical understanding has developed explosively in just the past decade.
I wasn't exactly talking about an abstract/representational divide, so much as an expression/technique divide. Anyway, I might have just been reading something into it that wasn't there. It is a good documentary nonetheless.

Probably the stuff that wowed me the most was the representational work, like that armadillo with every single plate defined in paper. I cannot fathom how that comes from a single square sheet of paper.
Do you mean this pangolin, by Eric Joisel?
http://img829.imageshack.us/img829/6676/pangolink.jpg

Another great model along those lines is Robert Lang's koi:
http://img59.imageshack.us/img59/8936/robertlangkoi.jpg

It just so happens that Lang's book has an entire chapter on the design technique of "pattern grafting", which is how models like that are designed.

Traumadore
02-06-2013, 02:05 PM
Yeah, that's the one, my goodness. It's mind boggling.