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View Full Version : Beans, Beans, the Musical Fruit


Paul le Fou
04-11-2013, 10:01 PM
So as I've started eating healthier and more natural stuff, I've found beans have been showing up in my diet more often. I've started cooking with lentils, chickpeas, chili beans and more, and want to expand my knowledge. My favorite part is that they're EASY as well as cheap and healthy, so I've been doing simple recipes.

I think one of my favorites so far has been simply throwing them in with rice & spice in the rice cooker. I've done two lentil dishes that way so far, and both turned out pretty tasty! I put a cup of lentils and one of water in there with a bunch of spices - like turmeric, cinnamon, cumin - and some olive oil, cook for about ten minutes, then add rice and more water and cook for another 25 or so (I use the "fast cook" setting on my cooker). One time I threw in carrots and onions, another time I threw in raisins in an attempt to make Adas Polo. It's pretty simple and versatile!

I've also put them in simple tomato soups/curries, as well. My tomato soup recipe is about as easy as it can possibly be, so this makes a filling dish and the only hard part is cleaning it up D:

Also, a can of chili beans with some sauteed onions and peppers and a medallioned sausage with some extra pepper and cumin/coriander/whatever makes another cheap filling tasty meal.


My next step is to use the bag of mung beans/mung dal I bought. Does anyone have any good ideas for them? I'm thinking of tossing them in the rice cooker with some rice&spice, like I've been doing with lentils, at least to start. I've also got a bag of split peas to figure out! What a wild and crazy foodventure this is.

Karzac
04-12-2013, 06:36 PM
Most important tip about beans: buy them dry and cook them yourself. They are so, so much better.

ajr82
04-12-2013, 06:46 PM
New Orleans-style red beans and rice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_beans_and_rice).

Teaspoon
04-12-2013, 06:52 PM
When I'm too lazy to put any effort into a dinner, sometimes I take a can of black beans and an appropriate portion of okra and mix it up with curry powder, onion powder, any other spices I feel like chucking in, and stick in in the oven for a while. Serve over rice. The spicier it is the better the effect, naturally.

Falselogic
04-12-2013, 07:26 PM
Good tip Karzac! Another thing to do is to soak your dry beans and rinse them multiple times.

This helps cut down on the toots!

Paul le Fou
04-14-2013, 06:58 AM
I went to the Halal store in Kobe and they had SO MANY BEANS. Every kind of lentil, chickpea, everything. I got some chana dal (split chickpeas) and whole chickpeas. I had to stop myself from buying toooo many beeeeeeans.

Karzac
04-14-2013, 07:17 AM
Chickpeas are the goddamn best bean. They are awesome and delicious. Be warned though: they take forever to cook if you haven't soak them. Soak them overnight to speed up the cooking process.

shivam
04-16-2013, 10:43 AM
1 cup split yellow mung beans, 1 cup rice, about 2 tsp of salt, half teaspoon of turmeric, some whole peppercorns. Stick into rice cooker, and bam, you have gujarati khichadi. eat with plain yogurt.

The Raider Dr. Jones
04-16-2013, 12:35 PM
here's a question on this tip -- I love sambar, the lentil/bean/split pea stuff you get at south Indian joints. Does anybody here know a good recipe for it that doesn't require a pressure cooker?

shivam
04-16-2013, 01:03 PM
Here's a basic recipe for cooking dal without a pressure cooker.

take your cup of dry lentils and soak for a good two hours. Drain the liquid.
In a pot, add the now swollen lentils and at least twice as much water, depending on how thin you want it. you can always thin it out later when making your variant, so don't worry too much here.
Cook that shit on medium/medium-high heat for about 40 minutes, uncovered. Skim the foam off as it goes. If you cover it, you'll have a mess.

You will know it's done when you can mash the lentils between your fingers into formless paste. At this point you should take an egg beater or whisk and stir the fuck out of the dal until it is all the consistency of baby food, super smooth and uniform.

Once you have the cooked dal, you can basically use it in any dal/sambar/rasam/whatever you want. You can also freeze this for a long time.

Mind you, this is mainly for split dal. Whole mung beans are slightly different.

The Raider Dr. Jones
04-16-2013, 01:07 PM
Thank yer. So many recipes online just say "use a pressure cooker," this will be very handy.

shivam
04-16-2013, 01:14 PM
pressure cookers are god sends, but i've had to cook without em before so i get it.

You can also use a rice cooker to cook dal in a pinch.

Oh, and the most commonly used lentils are split yellow, called Toor Dal in stores. they also taste the best, imo.

Paul le Fou
04-16-2013, 09:37 PM
1 cup split yellow mung beans, 1 cup rice, about 2 tsp of salt, half teaspoon of turmeric, some whole peppercorns. Stick into rice cooker, and bam, you have gujarati khichadi. eat with plain yogurt.

This is pretty much what I've been doing recently, except with other spices like cinnamon and nutmeg and cloves instead of peppercorns, and throwing in other stuff like raisins, dates, carrots, onions, etc. I should get peppercorns, that sounds good. Any old kind?

Oh, and the most commonly used lentils are split yellow, called Toor Dal in stores. they also taste the best, imo.

Thanks. I saw the bean wall (a full damn wall) at the Halal store in Kobe, where they had every kind of lentil and pea and bean and whatnot lying around dry in big old bags, and panicked at the variety. I ended up with a bag of chickpeas and a bag of chana dal (which are just shelled/split chickpeas, I'm pretty sure). Also ended up with a pack of quinoa and some couscous.

So the dal is taking lentils/beans and boiling them down into a paste, then using that in a dish? Interesting. Got any good basic recipe to start with?

Paul le Fou
07-23-2013, 05:50 AM
Anyone have any advice on starting with dry chickpeas and soaking them before eating? I tried once and they were still kind of hard and... squeaky. Not a very pleasant texture. What am I missing?

Teaspoon
07-23-2013, 06:53 AM
Anyone have any advice on starting with dry chickpeas and soaking them before eating? I tried once and they were still kind of hard and... squeaky. Not a very pleasant texture. What am I missing?

How long did you soak them? I think it has to be an entire day, or something. Can't be in the fridge, that won't work at all.

Paul le Fou
07-23-2013, 08:09 AM
12 hours, room temperature. That's what I heard/found in research. Maybe I'll try 24 next time.

shivam
07-23-2013, 08:25 AM
Soak them and then boil the fuck out of them, or use a pressure cooker. Those fuckers are tough.

Karzac
07-23-2013, 09:00 AM
12 hours, room temperature. That's what I heard/found in research. Maybe I'll try 24 next time.

24 hours is too long. Do twelve, then cook until they start to get tender (you can bite into one but it's still hard on the inside). Put some salt and pepper in and then cook for the same amount of time that it took them to get to that point. For me, it's usually about 2 hours.

Red Hedgehog
07-23-2013, 11:17 AM
Yeah, chickpeas take for goddamn ever. Soak overnight and then at least an hour on the stove, if not more.

Karzac
07-23-2013, 09:41 PM
It's so worth it though. I will never eat canned chickpeas again.

Paul le Fou
07-23-2013, 10:26 PM
Okay so soak then cook a long time, THEN use in... whatever. Roast or panfry or just like that or hummus.

Got it. I am READY for ROUND TWO

SpoonyBardOL
07-24-2013, 05:40 AM
It makes me sad that I can't really get dry beans at the stores here. Well, I can get dry Kidney Beans or Soldier Beans, but that's really all. The dry beans I REALLY want are Black Beans.

Mainly because unlike most other beans and lentils, Black Beans actually help prevent Gout instead of cause it. Granted the amount of purines in most other beans is pretty low compared to the really purine-rich stuff, but every little bit helps. Also I just like Black Beans.

When I make a trip back home next month I'll see if I can get some bulk dry Black Beans at the CostCo or something. Maybe some dry Chickpeas too.

Paul le Fou
07-24-2013, 06:16 AM
Yeah, I kinda want to figure out chili beans too. All of my cooking is middle eastern or indian influenced, and while those are awesome influences to have, I kinda want to branch out too. (Or maybe I should figure out more than one or two dishes from each first)

rurik
07-24-2013, 03:12 PM
I've had a reoccurring problem with my beans coming out woody. I think the issue is that older beans take more time to properly soak, and most of the beans I've run through have probably been on the shelf for a while.

One tip that helped me was brining your beans instead of simply soaking them. Just throw in a fuckton of salt, and they should soak so fast the skins will wrinkle until the rest of the bean catches up. Then just rinse them thoroughly and cook per usual