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View Full Version : TTBC February 2014: This Gaming Life by Jim Rossignol


Falselogic
02-03-2014, 02:30 PM
Jim Rossignol's This Gaming Life (http://www.amazon.com/This-Gaming-Life-Travels-Cities-ebook/dp/B003IKN1XW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1391466486&sr=8-1&keywords=This+gaming+life) is a strange mix of biography and travelogue, except the lens through which life is examined and the land travelled are the same: video games.

I've heard good and bad things about this book and I'm looking forward to reading it and finding out for myself what exactly it is.

Also looking forward to everyone else's thoughts on the book.

Violentvixen
02-03-2014, 09:34 PM
Darn, library doesn't have it.

Falselogic
02-19-2014, 04:30 PM
I guess Im the only person reading this so far...

I'm about a third in and while its been interesting reading so far, the author seems really intent on portraying video games in only a positive light. This sometimes makes the narrative seem awkward and strained...

Hoping the cheerleading gets checked or he attempts a more balanced approach to the subject. If we want to take video games seriously lets do them the favor of treating them as the complex things they are.

Evil Dead Junkie
02-19-2014, 08:48 PM
I was planning on reading it, but I came down with a severe case of being broke as fuck. This will hopefully be alleviated at the end of the month.

Falselogic
02-20-2014, 04:29 PM
The Reykjavik section has been the best by far and is doing a lot to redeem the book after the Seoul section (which for me was really depressing)

Tefari
02-24-2014, 08:51 AM
The Reykjavik section has been the best by far and is doing a lot to redeem the book after the Seoul section (which for me was really depressing)

So it does display more emotional breadth than "YAY VIDEOJAMES!" ? This sounds fascinating but I too am not interested in what you said, a cheerleading spiel.

Falselogic
02-24-2014, 09:05 AM
So it does display more emotional breadth than "YAY VIDEOJAMES!" ? This sounds fascinating but I too am not interested in what you said, a cheerleading spiel.

That is certainly the subtext of the entire book but there is some interesting stuff that rises above that.

I guess I'm disappointed mostly due to high expectations. People have been pointing this book out as one that helps to make games journalism and writing about video games legitimate and I believed them.

But, so much of this book seems to be centered on a trying to justify a habit, that the author loves, but deep down seems to find wrong in some sense.

Between this book and Ready Player One (another book that was supposed to be "serious" literature) I'm kind of done with this kind of stuff. At least until someone can do it much, much better.

Wish others had read this so that maybe someone could point out something I missed or highlight a different view.