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madhair60
06-09-2015, 01:47 AM
Has anyone ever had foie gras?

As a Poor Person, I have never had it. I long for it. Tell me about foie gras.

Olli T
06-09-2015, 04:19 AM
Once. It was like super greasy liver pat. I didn't particularly like it, but I'm not sophisticated like that.

Bge
06-09-2015, 07:00 AM
MORE LIKE FOIE GROSS

boyonion
06-09-2015, 07:03 AM
MORE LIKE FOIE GROSS

MCBanjoMike
06-09-2015, 07:06 AM
I've had it a bunch of times. It is kind of gross and very cruel to make, but French people don't think about that too hard.

upupdowndown
06-09-2015, 07:22 AM
It is exquisite and decadent and dammit, now I want some seared with a grilled peach slice and thyme

Nodal
06-09-2015, 07:23 AM
It is exquisite and decadent and dammit, now I want some seared with a grilled peach slice and thyme

The ol' Greasy Peach eh.

upupdowndown
06-09-2015, 07:26 AM
The ol' Greasy Peach eh.

:smirk:

tbh I eat chicken liver mousse and pates way more often than foie gras

Wolfgang
06-09-2015, 08:06 AM
It's good if you always wanted to try cat food but were too ashamed

MCBanjoMike
06-09-2015, 08:29 AM
It's good if you always wanted to try cat food but were too ashamed

MCBanjoMike likes this

Falselogic
06-09-2015, 08:49 AM
And hopefully illegal again in California soon!

Bge
06-09-2015, 09:27 AM
Yeah, in addition to being disgusting, it's also needlessly cruel to geese.

I mean, geese are assholes, but no one deserves to be force-fed corn mush until their liver swells up like a greasy balloon.

SpoonyBardOL
06-09-2015, 09:30 AM
Even during a boss fight, FOIE!

Red Hedgehog
06-09-2015, 10:03 AM
It is delicious. I mean, if you're into liver pats and the like. But then, what civilized human being isn't?


I can't believe stupid California tried to make it illegal.

Daikaiju
06-09-2015, 10:35 AM
It's like hummus made with duck livers instead of beans?

Parish
06-09-2015, 10:43 AM
It tastes like pure cholesterol. Nice in tiny, tiny amounts, as an accent to something less intense. I don't really care for it, but my wife's family loves it (being Vietnamese, they acquired a taste for it through French colonialism, I assume).

Hito
06-09-2015, 10:54 AM
Can we all take a step back and also grow up a little bit? Maybe look in to how foie is actually produced and not repeat the cruel history ad nauseum? Foie production, particularly in the US and now spreading to France and other countries, is one of the most humanely produced animal products in the world. The ducks and geese are no longer stapled to the floor of cramped, dark cages and made to live sedentary lives. It is increasingly common that the animals are free range, and by most accounts, quite happy animals. One producer assigns specific handlers to specific ducks and the animals develop a friendly relationship with the handler.

On the subject of force feeding, the process does not differ in a significant manner from the animals swallowing whole fish in the wild. The tube is inserted for only a few seconds multiple times a day. The ducks are not choking because they don't breath this way. In most cases, the feed is massaged down the neck of the duck but is a pleasurable experience for the ducks from humane producers. As well, after slaughter, all of the meat is used for other products. These animals are raised for their livers (and please keep in mind that the liver would become naturally engorged as the ducks prepare for migration in the wild and that this is, in fact, how foie was discovered), but producers are able to sell the breasts, wings, carcass, thighs, and legs.

Foie was formerly a cruelly produced rich people's food. It is still a rich person's food because of the costs associated in producing it, and I think on many cases the objection to foie is based on this rather than perceived animal cruelty. The precedent for cruelty changed in large part to bans in other parts of the world, most notably the ban led by Chicago's Rick Tramonto, which was quickly overturned. This is such a small industry in comparison to poultry farms that it can change and adapt more readily in light of criticism. The increased humanity in the production has led to a far better product, too. The animals are allowed to eat a more interesting variety of food which in turn changes the flavor of the liver.

On the subject of its culinary uses, it is most commonly served seared from raw (although most "raw" foie is still dry cured to remove bitterness), and this preparation does give a greasy, palate-coating mouthfeel. Because foie is mostly fat, it melts at a very low temperature and will do so readily with each bite. The other most common method is as a torchon, which is a way of enhancing the presentation and offers a different texture. A torchon is essentially a cured foie terrine which is cooked via poaching, typically in water but historically in white wines. This leaves the foie fully cooked, but spreadable. Foie in any preparation is usually served with something crunchy, something sweet, and something acidic. The cat food-like pt referred to in this thread is disappearing from menus in part because of that perception. But, foie is almost never meant to be eaten sans accoutrement.

It's fine to dislike it, but rejecting because it's a rich person's food or because you've heard stories of how it used to be made is misguided. Every year, I cook at an event and include foie on the menu to show its versatility as an ingredient and to give people the chance to experience it who otherwise probably never would.

Wolfgang
06-09-2015, 11:06 AM
It's fine to dislike it

very good

mopinks
06-09-2015, 11:08 AM
my one experience with foie gras was nice, but left me wishing I had ordered actual food instead

it's INSUBSTANTIAL

Red Hedgehog
06-09-2015, 11:09 AM
Can we all take a step back and also grow up a little bit? Maybe look in to how foie is actually produced and not repeat the cruel history ad naseum? Foue production, particularly in the US and now spreading to France and other countries, is one of the most humanely produced animal products in the world. The ducks and geese are no longer stapled to the floor of cramped, dark cages and made to live sedentary lives. It is increasingly common that the animals are free range, and by most accounts, quite happy animals. One producer assigns specific handlers to specific ducks and the animals develop a friendly relationship with the handler.

On the subject of force feeding, the process does not differ in a significant manner from the animals swallowing whole fish in the wild. The tube is inserted for only a few seconds multiple times a day. The ducks are not choking because they don't breath this way. In most cases, the feed is massaged down the neck of the duck but is a pleasurable experience for the ducks from humane producers. As well, after slaughter, all of the meat is used for other products. These animals are raised for their livers (and please keep in mind that the liver would become naturally engorged as the ducks prepare for migration in the wild and that this is, in fact, how foie was discovered), but producers are able to sell the breasts, wings, carcass, thighs, and legs.

Foie was formerly a cruelly produced rich people's food. It is still a rich person's food because of the costs associated in producing it, and I think on many cases the objection to foie is based on this rather than perceived animal cruelty. The precedent for cruelty changed in large part to bans in other parts of the world, most notably the ban led by Chicago's Rick Tramonto, which was quickly overturned. This is such a small industry in comparison to poultry farms that it can change and adapt more readily in light of criticism. The increased humanity in the production has led to a far better product, too. The animals are allowed to eat a more interesting variety of food which in turn changes the flavor of the liver.

On the subject of its culinary uses, it is most commonly served seared from raw (although most "raw" foie is still dry cured to remove bitterness), and this preparation does give a greasy, palate-coating mouthfeel. Because foie is mostly fat, it melts at a very low temperature and will do so readily with each bite. The other most common method is as a torchon, which is a way of enhancing the presentation and offers a different texture. A torchon is essentially a cured foie terrine which is cooked via poaching, typically in water but historically in white wines. This leaves the foie fully cooked, but spreadable. Foie in any preparation is usually served with something crunchy, something sweet, and something acidic. The cat food-like pt referred to in this thread is disappearing from menus in part because of that perception. But, foie is almost never meant to be eaten sans accoutrement.

It's fine to dislike it, but rejecting because it's a rich person's food or because you've heard stories of how it used to be made is misguided. Every year, I cook at an event and include foie on the menu to show its versatility as an ingredient and to give people the chance to experience it who otherwise probably never would.

:: orson welles applause::

though I'm not sure if I agree with the whole "It's fine to dislike it" idea

Hito
06-09-2015, 11:11 AM
It's not meant to be a meal on its own. At most, it's an appetizer. It's too rich to eat in entree portions and is mostly used to add richness to a course when the foie isn't the thing the plate is about.

mopinks
06-09-2015, 11:13 AM
sure, but when an appetizer costs $12 it officially becomes my meal

them's the rules

upupdowndown
06-09-2015, 11:15 AM
so so many words

damn, I didn't know all of that. Now I feel even less guilty about enjoying this delicious foodstuff. thanks Hito!

e: I hear you on the price, mopinks, but for me, eating out at a nice restaurant every month or so is a hobby we spend money on instead of cable or nice cars. It's a price I'm totally willing to pay.

Excitemike
06-09-2015, 12:25 PM
but rejecting because it's a rich person's food

I reserve the right to hate rich people's anything, but thank you for the informative post!

Vaeran
06-09-2015, 12:27 PM
Anyone who dislikes foie gras will be confined to a tiny, dirty crate and force-fed it until they recant their traitorous position.

Kylie
06-09-2015, 12:31 PM
Anyone who dislikes foie gras will be confined to a tiny, dirty crate and force-fed it until they recant their traitorous position.

At which point their livers will be harvested.

Wolfgang
06-09-2015, 12:34 PM
i mean if any of yall wanna eat grody ol cats food thats great but you know

its not pizza

Excitemike
06-09-2015, 12:36 PM
i mean if any of yall wanna eat grody ol cats food thats great but you know

its not pizza

What if it's pizza with foie gras?

Wolfgang
06-09-2015, 12:37 PM
What if it's pizza with foie gras?

NOW YOU're Talking! turns out all foie gras needed was tomato sauce and melted cheese

E: although the above was intended as a joke I'm convinced you could probably make cat food palatable on a pizza if you tried

Nodal
06-09-2015, 12:37 PM
What if it's pizza with foie gras?

The cat equivalent of those dog biscuit cupcakes.

mopinks
06-09-2015, 12:47 PM
frankly if I'm in the market to eat a slab of pure fat I'll probably stick with pork belly

Falselogic
06-09-2015, 12:49 PM
frankly if I'm in the market to eat a slab of pure fat I'll probably stick with pork belly

Listen to this guy!

upupdowndown
06-09-2015, 12:52 PM
frankly if I'm in the market to eat a slab of pure fat I'll probably stick with pork belly

pork belly is amazing! but it's not the same as foie. (for one thing I'd actually cook with it.)

Hito
06-09-2015, 01:00 PM
I reserve the right to hate rich people's anything, but thank you for the informative post!

As long as you extend this sentiment to lobster, caviar, truffles, saffron, gold leaf, fine dining in general, Rolls-Royce, and Club Med, I accept it.

Nodal
06-09-2015, 01:03 PM
As long as you extend this sentiment to lobster, caviar, truffles, saffron, gold leaf, fine dining in general, Rols Royce, and Club Med, I accept it.

i got a gold leaf pokemon card from mcdonalds when I was a kid you can take that off the list.

mopinks
06-09-2015, 01:04 PM
there's nothing dumber on this planet than eating gold

Falselogic
06-09-2015, 01:05 PM
As long as you extend this sentiment to lobster, caviar, truffles, saffron, gold leaf, fine dining in general, Rols Royce, and Club Med, I accept it.

Done and done!

*lock thread*

MCBanjoMike
06-09-2015, 01:14 PM
I mean, I'm glad the stuff is less cruel than we all thought, but it's still kinda gross and expensive.

Hito
06-09-2015, 01:26 PM
I don't see it as any more gross than eating other animal organs. I think this one tastes better than most with less effort. The price will likely never come down in a significant way.

Excitemike
06-09-2015, 01:38 PM
As long as you extend this sentiment to lobster, caviar, truffles, saffron, gold leaf, fine dining in general, Rols Royce, and Club Med, I accept it.

I actually don't like a lot of those things! But I was mostly thinking of stuff like parking your Jaguar across two lanes in a crowded parking lot, humblebragging about paying extra to find a gold iPhone 6 while stuffing it in a case that hides the fact that it is gold, insisting on being helped immediately then stopping mid-conversation to take a long phone call about the dog grooming, general self-entitlement, etc. These people would eat cat food if it was $150 an ounce.

Bge
06-09-2015, 01:54 PM
Can we all take a step back and also grow up a little bit? Maybe look in to how foie is actually produced and not repeat the cruel history ad naseum? Foue production, particularly in the US and now spreading to France and other countries, is one of the most humanely produced animal products in the world. The ducks and geese are no longer stapled to the floor of cramped, dark cages and made to live sedentary lives. It is increasingly common that the animals are free range, and by most accounts, quite happy animals. One producer assigns specific handlers to specific ducks and the animals develop a friendly relationship with the handler.

On the subject of force feeding, the process does not differ in a significant manner from the animals swallowing whole fish in the wild. The tube is inserted for only a few seconds multiple times a day. The ducks are not choking because they don't breath this way. In most cases, the feed is massaged down the neck of the duck but is a pleasurable experience for the ducks from humane producers. As well, after slaughter, all of the meat is used for other products. These animals are raised for their livers (and please keep in mind that the liver would become naturally engorged as the ducks prepare for migration in the wild and that this is, in fact, how foie was discovered), but producers are able to sell the breasts, wings, carcass, thighs, and legs.

Foie was formerly a cruelly produced rich people's food. It is still a rich person's food because of the costs associated in producing it, and I think on many cases the objection to foie is based on this rather than perceived animal cruelty. The precedent for cruelty changed in large part to bans in other parts of the world, most notably the ban led by Chicago's Rick Tramonto, which was quickly overturned. This is such a small industry in comparison to poultry farms that it can change and adapt more readily in light of criticism. The increased humanity in the production has led to a far better product, too. The animals are allowed to eat a more interesting variety of food which in turn changes the flavor of the liver.

On the subject of its culinary uses, it is most commonly served seared from raw (although most "raw" foie is still dry cured to remove bitterness), and this preparation does give a greasy, palate-coating mouthfeel. Because foie is mostly fat, it melts at a very low temperature and will do so readily with each bite. The other most common method is as a torchon, which is a way of enhancing the presentation and offers a different texture. A torchon is essentially a cured foie terrine which is cooked via poaching, typically in water but historically in white wines. This leaves the foie fully cooked, but spreadable. Foie in any preparation is usually served with something crunchy, something sweet, and something acidic. The cat food-like pt referred to in this thread is disappearing from menus in part because of that perception. But, foie is almost never meant to be eaten sans accoutrement.

It's fine to dislike it, but rejecting because it's a rich person's food or because you've heard stories of how it used to be made is misguided. Every year, I cook at an event and include foie on the menu to show its versatility as an ingredient and to give people the chance to experience it who otherwise probably never would.

So, one of those Foie Gras Council creeps got to you too, huh?

madhair60
06-09-2015, 01:59 PM
real talk, i do not give SHIT ONE about geese. madhair is a lover, not a fighter, and loves animals, all animals, but mother fuck a goose.

Excitemike
06-09-2015, 02:02 PM
Is there some way to torture a swan that makes it super delicious?
Could we just a torture a couple anyway and see what happens?

upupdowndown
06-09-2015, 02:09 PM
Imma just leave this here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ortolan_bunting#Gastronomy)

Wolfgang
06-09-2015, 02:11 PM
Is there some way to torture a swan that makes it super delicious?
Could we just a torture a couple anyway and see what happens?

Experiment 1: Swan is poked with knitting needles for 20 minutes. No change.

Experiment 2: Swan is mocked for being ugly as a child. No change.

Experiment 3: Swan is forced to do own small business taxes on April 3rd. No change.

Ans so on, in that fashion.

Red Hedgehog
06-09-2015, 02:13 PM
but mother fuck a goose.

Right on. No punishment is too much for geese. Goddamit.


And normally for everyone saying Foie Gras is gross, I'd just say you all are babies but it ain't no skin off my lip because more for me, but then it's still damn expensive. When's my wife getting her next gift certificate to Dean & Deluca?

Hito
06-09-2015, 02:20 PM
So, one of those Foie Gras Council creeps got to you too, huh?

Not quite. PETA's gross dismissal of foie got me curious. Being in the restaurant industry for 11 years led me to research the issue from an insider's angle. In fine dining, we tend to do a lot of one-on-one work with producers and purveyors. Cost is important, but at this level quality of product matters more. We would have duck farmers and foie representatives give us their spiel, but more importantly, our chefs would take the time to visit the production locations before making a choice about the product. Cheaper foie will be produced in less encouraging ways, as it is with large poultry or beef producers. And there is definitely a discernible quality difference even before the product is cooked.

Nodal
06-09-2015, 02:20 PM
Right on. No punishment is too much for geese. Goddamit.


And normally for everyone saying Foie Gras is gross, I'd just say you all are babies

Foie Gras is the Dark Souls of foods.

krelbel
06-09-2015, 02:22 PM
Imma just leave this here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ortolan_bunting#Gastronomy)

also this (https://twitter.com/drewtoothpaste/status/162902857232814081)

krelbel
06-09-2015, 02:25 PM
It's good if you always wanted to try cat food but were too ashamed

i mean if any of yall wanna eat grody ol cats food thats great but you know

its not pizza

NOW YOU're Talking! turns out all foie gras needed was tomato sauce and melted cheese

E: although the above was intended as a joke I'm convinced you could probably make cat food palatable on a pizza if you tried

what the hell are you feeding your cat

upupdowndown
06-09-2015, 02:40 PM
Foie Gras is the Dark Souls of foods.

pfft, balut is the Dark Souls of foods.

Excitemike
06-09-2015, 02:41 PM
Wow, never playing Dark Souls.

Wolfgang
06-09-2015, 02:46 PM
what the hell are you feeding your cat

It is, admittedly, high quality cat food.

Kylie
06-09-2015, 03:00 PM
pfft, balut is the Dark Souls of foods.

Dark Souls is satisfying when you learn how to consume it, though. Familiarity brings triumph.

Familiarity with balut only brings pain.

Balut is the Neptunia of food.

Sanagi
06-09-2015, 03:10 PM
I only know foie gras as the subject of one of Douglas Adams's wisest aphorisms: "Fuck it. You can't care about every damn thing."

Bge
06-09-2015, 04:14 PM
fuck a mother goose.

I've read that doujin.

Daikaiju
06-09-2015, 05:46 PM
My dad enjoys Liverwurst and I like it on occasion. I assume I'd enjoy foie gras.

Adam
06-10-2015, 08:51 AM
Foie gras is absolutely fantastic. I also recommend monkfish liver. It's nowhere near as buttery and luxurious, but it's something I love to treat myself to a couple times a year.

Hito
06-10-2015, 10:22 AM
Monkfish liver is excellent. Probably a bit more of an acquired taste than foie, but if you like seafood and melty textures, you can't go wrong.

R^2
06-10-2015, 11:08 AM
I am told that foie gras cooked sous vide is particularly good, since the melting fat has nowhere to go. It hits the plate even richer.

Lacking the budget for goose liver or a sous-vide machine, I pass this on as secondhand knowledge.

upupdowndown
06-10-2015, 11:12 AM
I am told that foie gras cooked sous vide is particularly good, since the melting fat has nowhere to go. It hits the plate even richer.

Lacking the budget for goose liver or a sous-vide machine, I pass this on as secondhand knowledge.

totally OT, but: the sous vide circulator (http://www.amazon.com/Anova-Culinary-Precision-Immersion-Circulator/dp/B00UKPBXM4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1433959878&sr=8-2&keywords=anova+sous+vide) I got for Xmas costs $180 and I use it pretty much at least once a week at this point. I wouldn't call that a cheap price point but it's pretty reasonable as far as high-end kitchen gadgets go.

mopinks
06-10-2015, 12:09 PM
$180 is a steal for a gadget that gives you the ability to make a perfect poached egg

MooMoo
06-10-2015, 03:56 PM
So is it posh(er) pat or whut?

Hito
06-10-2015, 06:33 PM
Depends on how it's prepared. A foie pate is one preparation and separate from torchon, mousse, roasted, or seared. The texture will always be soft, but is modified slightly by these different cooking methods.

shivam
06-10-2015, 06:36 PM
At the french laundry, the gentleman at the next table had a whole lobe of foie gras that was wrapped in fresh truffles. That's all i have to add to the conversation.

Kylie
06-11-2015, 09:22 AM
At the french laundry, the gentleman at the next table had a whole lobe of foie gras that was wrapped in fresh truffles. That's all i have to add to the conversation.

Holy shit I love both of those things but HOLY shit.

Also to supplement UUDD's post: The Anova immersion circulator he linked goes on sale fairly regularly these-a-days; I managed to get one for $99 on Amazon so if you're interested, watch for it.

CaliScrub
06-11-2015, 01:00 PM
Familiarity with balut only brings pain.

Balut is the Neptunia of food.

you crazy

Kylie
06-11-2015, 01:08 PM
you crazy

brb commissioning a drawing of a lady-style Chicken Fetus-tan for you.

Please look forward to it!

Lady
06-11-2015, 08:50 PM
Also to supplement UUDD's post: The Anova immersion circulator he linked goes on sale fairly regularly these-a-days; I managed to get one for $99 on Amazon so if you're interested, watch for it.

http://camelcamelcamel.com/Anova-Culinary-Precision-Immersion-Circulator/product/B00UKPBXM4/ might help with that

madhair60
06-12-2015, 02:12 AM
I've never had truffles either because I am a layman

madhair60
06-12-2015, 02:13 AM
I'm gonna go to the grave bereft of these things and that has suddenly made me really sad

mopinks
06-12-2015, 03:25 AM
I think I've only had truffles in truffle oil form, which is much more affordable than (and I assume NOT NEARLY THE SAME AS) the real deal

it's stanky and pretty nice

upupdowndown
06-12-2015, 06:10 AM
I've never had truffles either because I am a layman

I'm gonna go to the grave bereft of these things and that has suddenly made me really sad

Dude, what? You can taste these things at some point in your life, I assure you. If you're able to spend money on games, you can eventually spend a little money on a fancy food or two. A foie gras appetizer in my neck of the woods costs like $10-14 American and the corn-risotto agnolotti with brown butter and truffle shavings I had as an appetizer at a work dinner Monday cost $12. You're telling me that you'll never be able to spend 6.5 to 9 pounds to try something?

also on truffle oil, it's not made with actual truffles, just a synthetic compound. It can definitely be a nice flavor when used correctly but I got really tired of it because for a while it was en vogue and on everything, plus it's a fairly powerful flavor and it can lead to your dish being a little one-note or flat in its flavor. PROTIP: try a tiny bit of it in scrambled eggs with a good parmigiano reggiano.

madhair60
06-12-2015, 06:36 AM
man i can't walk into a place serving that stuff in good conscience, i'd lower property values just by being nearby

madhair60
06-12-2015, 06:40 AM
it just wouldn't feel right, to be doing fancy things like a person.

upupdowndown
06-12-2015, 06:56 AM
man i can't walk into a place serving that stuff in good conscience, i'd lower property values just by being nearby

it just wouldn't feel right, to be doing fancy things like a person.

Roast Beef Kazenzakis you stop this self-hating talk right now

krelbel
06-12-2015, 10:47 AM
I've never had truffles either because I am a layman

I'm gonna go to the grave bereft of these things and that has suddenly made me really sad

forever denying yourself delicious food because you've convinced yourself that it's "only for rich people" is dumb

Paul le Fou
06-12-2015, 11:31 AM
I say this as an adventurous foodie at heart who loves trying different foods and has food as probably his #1 target for discretionary spending:

I'll be the voice of dissent and say that while truffles and foie gras and caviar are tasty and all you're really not missing out on any life-changing experiences by saving your money for other stuff, and if you go to the grave having only tasted regular old plebeian mushrooms instead of fancy pig-farmed mushrooms, you will be not a smidge less rich of experience for it

Issun
06-13-2015, 12:07 PM
I've never had truffles either because I am a layman

Truffles are horrible anyway. You're not missing anything there.

Hito
06-14-2015, 05:01 PM
Except they're not and he is.

shivam
06-14-2015, 08:21 PM
truffles are good if used very carefully by a good chef with a deft hand. otherwise they overpower the fuck out of food.

I really really enjoy them, sometimes.

Issun
06-14-2015, 09:52 PM
truffles are good if used very carefully by a good chef with a deft hand. otherwise they overpower the fuck out of food.

That might be the problem.

Red Hedgehog
06-15-2015, 11:23 AM
I'll be the voice of dissent and say that while truffles and foie gras and caviar are tasty and all you're really not missing out on any life-changing experiences by saving your money for other stuff, and if you go to the grave having only tasted regular old plebeian mushrooms instead of fancy pig-farmed mushrooms, you will be not a smidge less rich of experience for it

On the other hand, if trying fancy foods is something you really want to do, it isn't that hard to make it happen. It isn't like wanting to climb Mt. Everest or go into space.

Sven
06-15-2015, 12:46 PM
I'm not a huge fan of foie, but I totally get the appeal. Eaten straight, it's not really a flavour / texture combination that works for me, even if it comes out of the kitchen at my go-to restaurant (http://www.trevorkitchenandbar.com/menus/main_menu.pdf). Doubly so because chefs tend to pair it with sugary accompaniments, which of course fuck with my blood sugar.

(The "foie bites" are new, actually; they used to do a foie gras poutine that I liked, albeit not as much as as the fucking amazing beef cheek or duck confit versions from a couple head chefs ago.)

I like it when it's in other forms, and ideally chilled - foie ice cream is great, for instance. I think I had it at a molecular gastronomy place where it got the snow treatment and that was pretty good.

I wish that higher-end asian places would use it more here, since old Iron Chef episodes taught me that it paired surprisingly well with Asian cooking. I also haven't found the time to go to Au Pied de Cochon (http://aupieddecochon.ca/menu/), AKA the Montreal restaurant that damned near killed Bourdain.

Red Hedgehog
12-23-2015, 11:30 AM
A friend brought some foie gras to our housewarming party and only about half was eaten during the party.

So I've been dining on foie gras for breakfast (and lunch) the past few days.

Yummmmmm.