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VsRobot
07-05-2007, 10:51 AM
Where do you rank The Departed among his films? For me, it's below his classics (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Goodfellas, Casino) but better than Cape Fear, Aviator, Gangs of New York, et al.

Suffice to say, I like it a lot.

Sheana
07-05-2007, 11:54 AM
I'm embarrased to say that the only Scorsese film I've seen to date is Gangs Of New York. I've been meaning to rectify this for a while.

I dunno when and if I'll get around to seeing The Departed, though. I'm a pretty squeamish person, and during the Oscar clips of the movie when they showed a guy fall off a building in front of one of the characters, complete with meaty impact sound and spray of blood, I went "oh god he splashed" and suddenly lost all urge in seeing it.

Evil Dead Junkie
07-05-2007, 01:02 PM
For me The Departed is a great film.

Though I must say as someone whose background are East Coast Irish, it was more or less tailor made for me.

I agree its not on Scorsese's first tier, say your Taxi Drivers, your Gangs Of New York, your Goodfellas, or your Mean Streets.

But It fits quite snuggly on his second tier among his Casino's, his Bring Out The Deads, etc.

I should mention that I'm a Scorsese super freak. I own every movie he's ever made (including shorts) and look at him less as a filmmaker as a favorite uncle I've never met.

It's a very Gasteau and Remy relationship. lol

VsRobot
07-05-2007, 01:20 PM
I didn't think I liked the Dropkick Murphys until that song, that fucking genius song was on the soundtrack. It's still the only song from them I've ever heard, but even if it's their only good one, they would still rank as an all-time great band.

I'm Shipping Up To Boston (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKyLgRzOTsY)

Evil Dead Junkie
07-05-2007, 01:24 PM
I've been a huge Dropkick fan for along time.

Its well worth it to pick up an album VS. Warrior's Code is a good starter.

That's what I love about Scorsese, people bag on him for using Gimme Shelter for the umpteenth time, but then he goes and gives a relitavly unknown band a pretty fucking big break.

He is the man.

Deadguy2322
07-05-2007, 02:17 PM
Scorcese is just as much of a master artist as Michaelangelo, Beethoven or Picasso. No other filmmaker comes close to presenting his vision without compromise. The fact that he's a genuinely nice guy is just icing on the cake.

JohnB
07-05-2007, 02:47 PM
...but then he goes and gives a relitavly unknown band a pretty fucking big break.

Dropkick Murphies is a relatively unknown band? Pshaw. Pshaw indeed.

Dizzy
07-05-2007, 03:05 PM
Scorcese is just as much of a master artist as Michaelangelo, Beethoven or Picasso. No other filmmaker comes close to presenting his vision without compromise. The fact that he's a genuinely nice guy is just icing on the cake.

O RLY? (http://www.sensesofcinema.com/)

I agree with your ranking VsRobot. However, for me, The Departed is only watchable because of Mark Wahlberg's character. Everything else is mindless cops and robbers.

Evil Dead Junkie
07-05-2007, 03:18 PM
Dropkick Murphies is a relatively unknown band? Pshaw. Pshaw indeed.

Note the word relatively, I'm not saying they're indie. But they're never on the radio, and while they have a big following with the large Irish East coast population (Boston, Cleveland, etc.) They where unheard on the west coast outside of true punk fans.

I stand by my statement.

Oh and Dizzy was that link meant to be too someone? I more or less agree with Deadguy, and at the moment I have Bresson, Mizoguchi, and Man Bites Dog in my back pack. Bring it.

VsRobot
07-05-2007, 03:29 PM
"Unknown" doesn't mean what it used to. Who only gets exposed to music via the radio and MTV?

(Old man talking) I remember when I was coming up, I discovered bands reading grainy zines and sending $4 in singles through the mail to get a seven inch that got a good write-up in Maximum Rock'n'Roll. There was no iTunes or eMusic, there was get off your fucking ass, go to a show at Gilman st, and rifle through the bins of vinyl buying as many seven inches as you could afford. Knowing a lot about a niche in music took fucking effort - but some kid with Limewire probably hears more new music in a week than I discovered in a year back then.

I wrote a fuckton of fan mail, too, and I always asked for tapes and I sent stamps. "Do you have any good demo tapes from bands in your area?" You'd be surprised how many I got. Now you just go to a bands Myspace and troll through their friend list to find other bands in a similar vein.

I wouldn't trade my musical youth for anything, but fucking kids today have it made. Everyone is a fucking expert. Everyone can get a entire band's discography in minutes -- it took me forever to track down certain songs I needed. On the one hand, the elitist in me is annoyed at that anyone can get any song and a large musical vocabulary isn't special anymore. On the other, it's awesome that I can acquire a large collection of a niche UK rap subculture with just a little googling, stuff that isn't licensed in America and that I would have never heard otherwise.

Dizzy
07-05-2007, 03:29 PM
Oh and Dizzy was that link meant to be too someone? I more or less agree with Deadguy, and at the moment I have Bresson, Mizoguchi, and Man Bites Dog in my back pack. Bring it.

I like how Bresson is viewed as the limit of "seriousness" in movies. I'd choose Scorsese over him, and some fogy dramatist, and some grainy exploitation flick.

Evil Dead Junkie
07-05-2007, 03:33 PM
Man your taste just keeps getting better and better.

Why not state your preferences so I can start mocking those?

Deadguy2322
07-06-2007, 10:34 AM
Man your taste just keeps getting better and better.

Why not state your preferences so I can start mocking those?

He's probably WAY into Spielberg's post-1982 output.

estragon
07-06-2007, 10:39 AM
]They where unheard on the west coast outside of true punk fans.

This amuses me, because they seem to be pretty well known in the midwest among non-commercial radio listening folk. The 3 or so shows I saw of theirs in Kansas and Minnesota were packed with crazy fans who knew the words to all of their songs.

thomp538
07-06-2007, 10:41 AM
He's probably WAY into Spielberg's post-1982 output.
Hook was a beautiful movie, it touched me ... in a strange place

Evil Dead Junkie
07-06-2007, 01:15 PM
Did you go up Robin Williams Wishing Tree?

Yeah 1983-1997 not so much with the Spielberg. (with of course some noted exceptions Schindler's List, Last Crusade).

Still I think his post 1997 work has been nicely esoteric with him actually making a movie about a blue collar people again (Saving Private Ryan, Catch Me If You Can), using the brand name to make a hardcore film (Munich), or just plain going batshit crazy (AI, Minority Report)

Like I said I'm not saying all these movies worked, far from it, I'm just saying they where all intresting. Even War Of The Worlds had what was probably the most misanthropic scene in Spielberg's career (Even though the movie didn't quite work the scene where the Mob turns on Cruise's family for the car is some ugly ugly shit)

Deadguy2322
07-07-2007, 07:58 AM
I find once Spielberg began believing his own hype, that was it for him. He lost touch with the humanity that informed his earliest work. I love Duel and Jaws, Close Encounters and ET are excellent studies of how common people would react to the unknown, but he has fallen into a trap of putting his politics into his movies, and trying to sell tickets above storytelling. His trite happy endings are a cop-out, and his need to have kids save the day are just insulting to the audience. He should have been euthanized for Jurassic Park.

Evil Dead Junkie
07-07-2007, 01:54 PM
Yeah but even in that he had the TRex scene, which tapped into something primal and powerful. If only for 15 minutes.

But to get the topic back on topic, Ebert has made about as good an arguement as I've heard for the The Departed's greatness.

Watched it this morning again I agree Uncle Jackie IS excellent.

http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070705/REVIEWS/70705002

thomp538
07-07-2007, 08:11 PM
Did you go up Robin Williams Wishing Tree?

Yeah 1983-1997 not so much with the Spielberg. (with of course some noted exceptions Schindler's List, Last Crusade).

Still I think his post 1997 work has been nicely esoteric with him actually making a movie about a blue collar people again (Saving Private Ryan, Catch Me If You Can), using the brand name to make a hardcore film (Munich), or just plain going batshit crazy (AI, Minority Report)

Like I said I'm not saying all these movies worked, far from it, I'm just saying they where all intresting. Even War Of The Worlds had what was probably the most misanthropic scene in Spielberg's career (Even though the movie didn't quite work the scene where the Mob turns on Cruise's family for the car is some ugly ugly shit)
Sort of liked the one with Tom Hanks in the airport.

And speaking of Scorsese, I mostly liked The Aviator.