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Mightyblue
08-14-2007, 11:18 PM
Thread title's self explanatory, I assume (and hope :P).

I'm currently winding my way through the Bourne Identity. I'm about halfway done, and it's striking how much of the book got cut out or changed in order to fit into the movie plot and the change in time (from late 70's, early 80's to 00's). It makes you realize just how good a job the people in charge of the screenplay were. I'm still on the fence on whether I actually like the book or not. Have to finish it and see.

Next up: Parasite Eve (once I track down a copy, anyway)

Maggie
08-14-2007, 11:26 PM
I'm rereading the second book in Clive Barker's Abarat series. I hope he hurries up with the third one. This is taking forever.

Eusis
08-14-2007, 11:27 PM
I was almost considering bumping the old topic. This is fine though.

I have the Gunslinger and 1984 checked out, and also decided to get The Hero with a Thousand Faces after the mention in the HG101 Vagrant Story feature. Read through a part of the Gunslinger and like it, but I just really haven't felt like going through more of it. I already renewed it twice, I may have to just return it in the end unfinished.

shivam
08-14-2007, 11:42 PM
just finished Heat by bill buford (a former editor of the new yorker goes and works for mario batali, and all sorts of other awesome food porn), and am working through diamond age by stephenson.

also, obligatory DL book of the month--The Rebellion (stonetellers 1) by Jean Rabe.

Mazian
08-15-2007, 12:04 AM
Maximum City, by Suketu Mehta. A big, sprawling, hyperkinetic look at the similarly-characterized city of Bombay*. It's completely fascinating.

* He's a native, from before it got renamed/re-Anglicized to Mumbai.

shivam
08-15-2007, 12:05 AM
dude, i LOVE Maximum City! Its such a damned awesome book in so many ways. makes me yearn for my home back in india.

Sheana
08-15-2007, 12:41 AM
I sadly don't have much time to read anymore. But when I get back to it, I'm still in the midst of George R.R. Martin's A Clash Of Kings.

Makkara
08-15-2007, 01:11 AM
I just finished the first volume of the Man-Kzin Wars (http://www.amazon.com/Man-Kzin-Wars-Book/dp/0671720767/). It was quite good, (especially the story by Poul Anderson) which makes me all the more annoyed that the second volume doesn't seem to be available (unused) anywhere.

Reading now: The Last Unicorn (http://www.amazon.com/Last-Unicorn-Peter-S-Beagle/dp/0451450523/). Too early to give any verdict.

openedsource
08-15-2007, 03:25 AM
Just finished William Gibson's Spook Country over the weekend. I might pick up the Warren Ellis novel just to see what all the fuss is about.

nadia
08-15-2007, 03:41 AM
Oh snap, I really need to get back to "Dragons of the Dwarven Depths." I was enjoying it until Harry Potter usurped it.

Jakanden
08-15-2007, 03:55 AM
I am waiting for The Lost Chronicles Trilogy to be completed before I start reading the first one myself.

As far as what I am reading, currently it is "The Best of HP Lovecraft", Gibson's "Virtual Light" and later this week I will be starting "The Hunter's Blades Trilogy"

nadia
08-15-2007, 04:09 AM
I am waiting for The Lost Chronicles Trilogy to be completed before I start reading the first one myself.

That's not a bad idea. Just be careful where you buy the books. I got mine at a major Canadian chain.

CASHIER: "Oh, the second book is out, too."

ME: "Yeah, I might wait 'til it hits paperback."

CASHIER: "(Spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler.)"

ME: "Thanks, bye!"

sraymonds
08-15-2007, 05:12 AM
I'm thinking about starting either "Soon I will be Invincible" or "Stardust". I want to track down Mike Carey's "The Devil You Know" though. In audio, I started listening to "The Terror", but I don't know if I'm going to stick with that one.

marcalan
08-15-2007, 05:32 AM
Currently reading "My Tank is Fight!" It's a pretty good read, even if you don't know anything about WW2.

After this is up in the air. I need to finish Gene Wolfe's "The Wizard," but I also want to reread American Gods or Fragile Things. I'm also tracking down a copy of John M. Ford's "Dragon Awaiting." It shall be mine some day!

jeditanuki
08-15-2007, 05:45 AM
My reading list is frighteningly close to sraymond's, as I just finished "Soon I Will Be Invincible" and I'm in the middle of "Stardust".

The-Bavis
08-15-2007, 05:51 AM
Reading Phillip Roth's "The Plot Against America". Nearing the end and it has been pretty wonderful.

Jakanden
08-15-2007, 06:19 AM
That's not a bad idea. Just be careful where you buy the books. I got mine at a major Canadian chain.

CASHIER: "Oh, the second book is out, too."

ME: "Yeah, I might wait 'til it hits paperback."

CASHIER: "(Spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler, spoiler.)"

ME: "Thanks, bye!"

Luckily, I order most of my books online so I don't have to deal with that as I would have been pissed.

reibeatall
08-15-2007, 06:31 AM
I just started reading "Scattered Suns" by Kevin J. Anderson (waiting for the flames), and I'm about to start reading Harry Potter. The first one.

Manna
08-15-2007, 06:36 AM
If the footnotes in Gungrave Design Works don't count, then Stupid White Men. It's rather quaint!

VsRobot
08-15-2007, 07:45 AM
I just finished the two most recent books in the current Star Wars EU storyline.

Not enough Boba Fett.

ScrambledGregs
08-15-2007, 07:54 AM
I was re-reading one of my college textbooks about Ancient Chinese Philosophy, but then the Penny Arcade collections I ordered off Amazon arrived...

cortbassist89
08-15-2007, 08:12 AM
I'm very casually reading The Zombie Survival Guide.

Next, perhaps The Godfather or Ulysses.

Stephen
08-15-2007, 08:17 AM
I'm about halfway through Russell Hoban's "Ridley Walker". It's good, but I know I'm missing a lot of refrences. For instance, a lot of the people's names seem to be the names of companies or products, but I don't recognize any of them. I really want to finish it, that way I can look up all the shit I missed.

I also picked up "Mainspring" by Jay Lake at the library. I don't know anything about it, but it had an airship on the cover and the word automaton on the jacket, so I figured I'd give it a shot. Clockwork robots are cool.

Loki
08-15-2007, 08:18 AM
Just finished Deathly Hallows so now I can get back to Perdido Street Station and Shriek: An Afterword.

Then I think I might read The Book of the New Sun again.

Also, my bathroom time is currently used to peruse The Cartoon History of the Universe (Volume II).

Excitemike
08-15-2007, 08:43 AM
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d25/eye_robot/miscellaneous/fouthworldomni.jpg

Expect a gushing review within the next week.

Jeanie
08-15-2007, 09:32 AM
I just finished the two most recent books in the current Star Wars EU storyline.

Not enough Boba Fett.

I agree. It seems like he's only in the Karen Traviss (http://www.karentraviss.com/) written books. Also that part at the end just smaked of stupid bullshit to me.

*spoilers*

If when Mara died she didn't become a Force Ghost to leave behind a message, why not become one, come back to Luke and say "Jacen killed me". It's not like her murderer is a complete stranger to both of them. Plus that seems more in character for Mara, to not be all cryptic and just get to the point of the matter.

*end Spoilers*

Parish
08-15-2007, 10:10 AM
I finished up The Amber Spyglass last week (blurgh) and am currently betwixt book endeavors so as to better appreciate MGS3 and BioShock et al. However, next on my list is A Confederacy of Dunces, which I've been wanting to tackle for years. I actually picked it up on the way to TGS last year... maybe I should save it for this year's trip.

bobservo
08-15-2007, 10:25 AM
It took me forever to get through a monstrosity of a Wilkie Collins book (NOT WORTH IT), so now I'm reading a trashy Stephen King book by the name of The Regulators.

Crazy Larry
08-15-2007, 10:58 AM
Just finished a few of Pratchett's discworld novels, Going Postal and Moving Pictures. The former was great, and the latter was good, but not as amazing as some of his stuff. Now I'm starting on Dune, because I need to start reading some more (actually, any) sci-fi, and it seems like it'll get me in a decent political bent of mind that I need for the story I'm trying to write now.

I also keep going through A Feast For Crows because Martin won't quit writing fan-fiction long enough to finish A Dance With Dragons.

cortbassist89
08-15-2007, 12:26 PM
I think I'm gonna hit Watership Down by Richard Adams next, mostly thanks to Donnie Darko.

Once school hits, I'll have no time for reading what I want, as I'll be stuck reading assigned books like Alice in Wonderland. Why an Advanced Placement senior english class is reading a children's book, I'll never understand.

nathan
08-15-2007, 12:36 PM
I've been reading the Nixon tapes off and on because you can only take so much in one sitting.

I'm almost done with Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years by David Talbot. It's basically an outline of all the events and policy changes that made people hate the Kennedys. It also gives in-depth profiles of the Band of Brothers that does nothing more than make me a bit sad when I slowly realize that we may never see a US government that pure and optimistic ever again. Plus learning about all the bat shit generals in the Joint Chiefs is scary as hell. It's amazing how close this country was to a bloody coup after the Bay of Pigs.

The big surprise though is how not evil Fidel Castro is and was. Oh silly US media and your anti-communist propaganda.

The-Bavis
08-15-2007, 01:03 PM
It took me forever to get through a monstrosity of a Wilkie Collins book (NOT WORTH IT...

I have read one Wilkie Collins book and it created the same sentiment in me.

Figure Four
08-15-2007, 01:13 PM
I've just started reading the second volume of The Demon Princes by Jack Vance. This is actually the first of his series that I've read and I quite liked the first volume. Also, Michael Swanwick totally stole the idea of the Institute for Stations of the Tide.

Next I think I'll read the fourth Halo book, Ghosts of Onyx, probably followed by Pale Fire by Nabokov.

bobservo
08-15-2007, 05:15 PM
I have read one Wilkie Collins book and it created the same sentiment in me.

Which one? I read The Woman in White and was honestly surprised that it sucked so much because I really dug one of his short stories.

Sanagi
08-15-2007, 06:39 PM
Alternating between two books...

"A Short History of Nearly Everything" by Bill Bryson which is quite interesting and as a bonus contains many reasons to fear imminent apocalypse.

"Thud" by Terry Pratchett. I'm not sure if I'll finish this. Please understand, I'm about as big a Pratchett fan as anyone around here, but after twenty-odd books I think I'm kinda done with Discworld.

My favorite book that I read recently was "The Man Who Folded Himself," which pretty much takes the time-travel story to its logical extreme.

Maggie
08-15-2007, 06:51 PM
"A Short History of Nearly Everything" by Bill Bryson which is quite interesting and as a bonus contains many reasons to fear imminent apocalypse.



Ooh, that sounds pretty interesting. What kind of reasons?

Sanagi
08-17-2007, 02:22 AM
Ooh, that sounds pretty interesting. What kind of reasons?
Well, there's the usual reason of "An asteroid could be on its way to hit us right now and there's a good chance we'd miss it, and by the way you'll have about a second to see it coming before you're dead."

There's also apparently a ginormous pressure bubble under Yellowstone that explodes the hell out of the Earth's crust every few hundred thousand years.

Merus
08-17-2007, 03:22 AM
"Thud" by Terry Pratchett. I'm not sure if I'll finish this. Please understand, I'm about as big a Pratchett fan as anyone around here, but after twenty-odd books I think I'm kinda done with Discworld.

Man, I'm the same. I liked Going Postal, but other than that the last few books have just left me cold. The Tiffany Aching ones have been alright, though.

I am reading the Count of Monte Cristo right now.

jeditanuki
08-17-2007, 06:05 AM
Alternating between two books...

"Thud" by Terry Pratchett. I'm not sure if I'll finish this. Please understand, I'm about as big a Pratchett fan as anyone around here, but after twenty-odd books I think I'm kinda done with Discworld.



Good! Now I don't feel quite so bad that this happened to me at "Monstrous Regiment".

nadia
08-17-2007, 07:34 AM
I have to admit, I'm not a Prachett fan. I appreciate his writing, but I just never got into it. I was never a fan of Douglas Adams, either.

Hey avid readers who hold jobs that include noontime feedings in office / retail lunchrooms, have you given up reading during lunch hour? I know I did when I worked retail. People would either constantly ask "WHATCHYA READING??? IS IT GOOD? THE MOVIE WAS GOOD!!!" or they'd make fun of you for being a bookworm.

In one instance, I worked with people who got angry with me because I read through lunch hour and was obviously "trying to be smarter than them." WTF.

Kolbe
08-17-2007, 07:54 AM
I'm reading Rayuela (Hopscotch), from Julio Cortazar. He would be happy doing videogames, I think.

sraymonds
08-17-2007, 08:16 AM
Hey avid readers who hold jobs that include noontime feedings in office / retail lunchrooms, have you given up reading during lunch hour? I know I did when I worked retail. People would either constantly ask "WHATCHYA READING??? IS IT GOOD? THE MOVIE WAS GOOD!!!" or they'd make fun of you for being a bookworm.

In one instance, I worked with people who got angry with me because I read through lunch hour and was obviously "trying to be smarter than them." WTF.

I read during my lunch hours, but I work at a library, so no one really bothers me. The co-workers are all fairly understanding.

And it seems you don't have to "try" to be smarter than them, because you already are.

doc_marten_abortion
08-17-2007, 08:36 AM
I've been reading a lot lately. The machines that are necessary for me to accomplish my work goals are down which leaves me eight hours of free time to spend it as I see fit; that is to say, as I see fit as long as my chain of command doesn't think it's spent frivolously. Therefore, I've been given the A-OK to push through a few books. I just finished "IV" by Chuck Klosterman; not his best work to date, but I've never been much for editorial compilations of published stories and essays. I really enjoyed "Sex, Drugs & Cocoa Puffs" but this just left me a little underwhelmed.

I'm currently wrapped up in "The Curse of Chalion". I decided that because I've read many of the so-called classics of literature, that I'd delve into another area of fiction that receive or are nominated for Hugo Awards. I had previously read "Jonathon Strange & Mr. Norrell" as well as "American Gods," both Hugo recipients, and I quite enjoyed them both. Since Ms. Bujold is held in great esteem with that organization, I decided her book would make a great notch to my fantasy bed post. So far, a little dry. "American Gods" it is not. But, then, little is.

openedsource
08-17-2007, 08:49 AM
In one instance, I worked with people who got angry with me because I read through lunch hour and was obviously "trying to be smarter than them." WTF.

To echo sraymonds, the perfect response to that statement is "apparently, I don't have to try very hard."

The-Bavis
08-17-2007, 09:10 AM
Which one? I read The Woman in White and was honestly surprised that it sucked so much because I really dug one of his short stories.

Same here. It's the only one of his I've read. It was decent at the start, but then became obvious that he didn't know where the story was headed and he was just trying to get more "episodes" in the serial. I remember thinking that "The Secret" that was talked up from the beginning was very weak.

Mightyblue
08-17-2007, 10:55 AM
I'm currently wrapped up in "The Curse of Chalion". I decided that because I've read many of the so-called classics of literature, that I'd delve into another area of fiction that receive or are nominated for Hugo Awards. I had previously read "Jonathon Strange & Mr. Norrell" as well as "American Gods," both Hugo recipients, and I quite enjoyed them both. Since Ms. Bujold is held in great esteem with that organization, I decided her book would make a great notch to my fantasy bed post. So far, a little dry. "American Gods" it is not. But, then, little is.Her two other books set in the Chalion universe are a bit livelier I suppose, but Cazaril's always had a soft spot in my heart. Not often you get mains who are washed-up middle-aged noblemen.

doc_marten_abortion
08-17-2007, 10:58 AM
Sometimes I need some reinforcement with books: It took one Shawn Elliot to get me to pull "The Road" off of the shelf after I originally dismissed it for it's peculiar style. Turned out to be one of my favorite books last year, despite the little Oprah seal of approval. Thanks.

Maggie
08-17-2007, 12:00 PM
I read during my lunch hours, but I work at a library, so no one really bothers me. The co-workers are all fairly understanding.

And it seems you don't have to "try" to be smarter than them, because you already are.

I used to read during lunch break my entire senior year of high school, which led passerby to say nice things about how I was apparently retarded.

It was very strange. And it wasn't as though I was reading something like "Hey, I'm a Retard: For Dummies" or anything. So who knows.

doc_marten_abortion
08-17-2007, 12:46 PM
Are you sure it wasn't the fat tongue or the Pete Rose hairdo that tipped them off?

bjoe
08-17-2007, 01:21 PM
Currently i'm wading my way throught "Blackwater: The Rise of the World's Most Powerfyl Mercenary Army" beacuse I saw it on the Colbert Report and, well it seemed interesting. I'm stuck in the beginning and haven't touched it in weeks.

Maggie
08-17-2007, 01:35 PM
Are you sure it wasn't the fat tongue or the Pete Rose hairdo that tipped them off?

That was cool back in my day! Was a sign of status, I tell ya.

sraymonds
08-17-2007, 04:38 PM
I used to read during lunch break my entire senior year of high school, which led passerby to say nice things about how I was apparently retarded.

It was very strange. And it wasn't as though I was reading something like "Hey, I'm a Retard: For Dummies" or anything. So who knows.

Well, if it helps, most teens are dicks.

doc_marten_abortion
08-17-2007, 05:03 PM
That was cool back in my day! Was a sign of status, I tell ya.

:)

Crazy Larry
08-23-2007, 11:59 AM
I'm kicking myself for not having picked up the Dune series earlier now. I just flew through the first two books, and the ending of Dune Messiah made it one of the few books that has moved me to tears. Granted, I'm a sucker for that type of resolution, but still, two beautifully crafted books. I'm starting on Erickson's Malazan series and another Discworld book before I dig deeper into Dune.

shivam
08-23-2007, 12:24 PM
no, dont do it! the first two books are masterworks of literature. the rest are not.

VsRobot
08-23-2007, 03:12 PM
As poor as the latter Dune books are, they are masterworks of literature compared to the Kevin J Anderson-penned tie-ins.

Trumpy
08-23-2007, 06:57 PM
Catching up on 100 Bullets in TPB, starting Drifting Classroom after all those mentions by Parish, and The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon.

Indalecio
08-23-2007, 07:23 PM
BSCI (http://www.amazon.com/CCNP-BSCI-Official-Certification-Guide/dp/158720147X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-7656325-2186444?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1187921776&sr=8-1)

/kills thread with heavy textbook

Excitemike
08-23-2007, 07:43 PM
Catching up on 100 Bullets in TPB, starting Drifting Classroom after all those mentions by Parish, and The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon.

Trumpy!? Would... would you care for a winged potato?

Trumpy
08-23-2007, 08:13 PM
Trumpy!? Would... would you care for a winged potato?

That potato would be even better with Smucker's raspberry preserves.

Mazian
08-23-2007, 08:48 PM
Once I've started a book, I find it very hard to abandon it. In some cases, even after reading the first book of a trilogy and finding it bad, I've gone and read the next two just to finish the (tired, hackneyed, cliched) plot. It's a tough grip to break.

The fifth Dune book was so bad that I abandoned it quite early on, never looked back, and couldn't bring myself to look at any other book in the series. If you must read more, stop after the third. You'll be happier for it.

As poor as the latter Dune books are, they are masterworks of literature compared to the Kevin J Anderson-penned tie-ins.
Others have expressed similar (http://www.penny-arcade.com/2003/10/15) sentiments (http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2003/10/15).

Alex Scott
08-23-2007, 09:05 PM
I just finished A Storm of Swords an hour or so ago. The plot twists (especially the one on the very last page) were pretty overwhelming. On the other hand, it took me all month to finish it. I have A Feast For Crows on my to-read fiction shelf, but I think I may bump it back a bit. I already have Ulysses, The Tale of Genji, and The Brothers Karamozov ahead of it, so I decided it should come later, after Animal Farm and Childhood's End.

Last week, I finished Paul Tillich's The Shaking of the Foundations. Tillich is totally my theological hero. He certainly makes, say, Tim LaHaye look like a chump.

And tomorrow, I'm going to get going on Thomas Merton's The Seven Storey Mountain.

keele864
08-25-2007, 03:44 PM
Figure Four wrote:
I've just started reading the second volume of The Demon Princes by Jack Vance. This is actually the first of his series that I've read and I quite liked the first volume. Also, Michael Swanwick totally stole the idea of the Institute for Stations of the Tide.

I've read The Star King and The Killing Machine and I hope to get through The Palace of Love before the end of summer. I too am finding The Demon Princes very enjoyable.

At the moment, I'm reading John le Carre's The Honourable Schoolboy, Thomas Pynchon's Against the Day, and Umberto Eco's The Island of the Day Before. I like all three novels, though Pynchon's book is unbelievably long and quite difficult, and the Eco isn't as good as his first novel, The Name of the Rose, which is one of my favorite books.

Daikaiju
08-26-2007, 09:09 AM
I'm trying to get the nerve up to finish A Game Of Thrones. I really hate watching folks paint themselves into a corner.

Jeanie
08-29-2007, 06:56 PM
So I picked up the new Star Wars: Legacy of the Force book, Inferno, today.

Spoilers:I was pleasently surprised by how they handled Jacen, excuse me, Darth Cadeus' turn to the Dark Side. This chapter showed everyone turning on him while not quite knowing how far he's gone. At the end when Tenel Ka even turns on him, it one, reminded me of how Padme turned from Anakin, and two, just seemed to give this feeling of "oh hell, he's gonna snap". Honestly, I wish this chapter wasn't so short (289pgs), because I really want to see where this going next. Also SO not surprised by the Sith enclave on Korriban.

Figure Four
08-29-2007, 07:25 PM
I've read The Star King and The Killing Machine and I hope to get through The Palace of Love before the end of summer. I too am finding The Demon Princes very enjoyable.


I'm actually kind of shocked that another person on these boards is reading that series. Small world. I finished up The Book of Dreams (the final, and best, book in the series) and I am really looking forward to reading more Vance. It took me a little while to get into the series but once I realized that it was less sci-fi than it was, "James Bond...In Space!" it kind of clicked.

When I start up Mass Effect come November I'm so naming my character Kirth.

Currently reading: Halo: The Ghost of Onyx. Like the other Nylund penned Halo novels it's a lot of fun. Just makes me that much more excited for September 25th.

tungwene
08-29-2007, 07:26 PM
I am reading C. J. Cherryh Foreigner and once I'm finished with with ~10 novel series I'm going to be reading Zelazny's Great Book of Amber, another 10 novels. I've got my reading schedule booked.

Evil Dead Junkie
08-29-2007, 07:34 PM
Just finished Carl Hiassen's Sick Puppy.

Chock full of Hiassen's trademark mix of surrealty, lunacy, hilarity, and plain old hardcore noir.

Alex Scott
08-29-2007, 07:39 PM
Hooray for Carl Hiaasen! And hooray for him co-writing songs with Warren Zevon (actually how I discovered Hiaasen in the first place).

estragon
08-29-2007, 08:00 PM
Reading now: The Last Unicorn (http://www.amazon.com/Last-Unicorn-Peter-S-Beagle/dp/0451450523/). Too early to give any verdict.

This is a criminally underrated book. It tells a beautiful story while also parodying common elments in fantasy stories. If you don't like it, I will loose all respect for you.

Has anyone else ever read this? I've only met one other person who has, and she was the one who loaned it to me in the first place. If you haven't, please do.

Figure Four
08-29-2007, 08:21 PM
I read it a couple years ago and I really and truly loved it. I've always been interested in the idea of immortality and its consequences (in fact one of my favorite characters/stories that I've come up with deals quite extensively with this topic). Of all the stuff I've read that has dealt with immortality The Last Unicorn is by far my favorite. A must read for fantasy fans.

Sheana
08-29-2007, 09:04 PM
Man, I've been wanting to read The Last Unicorn for ages. It's one of several Never Read The Book But Grew Up On The Rankin & Bass Animated Movie incidents in my life.

chud_666
08-29-2007, 09:23 PM
Im read this book Cloud Atlas. Very weird. It has a strage structure that jumps around various plots and timelines every 50 pages, but yet is all interconnected. Not finished yet, but highly recommended. SO far....

estragon
08-29-2007, 09:26 PM
Man, I've been wanting to read The Last Unicorn for ages. It's one of several Never Read The Book But Grew Up On The Rankin & Bass Animated Movie incidents in my life.

Oh, man. There's just no comparing the book and the movie. The cartoon is definitely a decent children's fantasy cartoon, but the book manages to both be a cool fantasy story that kids could enjoy and be hilarious and experimental with fantasy conventions.

(Side note: The Princess Bride is also like this. The movie is a fairly conventional fantasy story, but the book is both a conventional story and plays with fantasy conventions. If you've only seen the movie, YOU MUST READ THE BOOK.)

poetfox
08-29-2007, 09:55 PM
I dunno if it really counts, perse, as it's certainly not a full novel, but I just read the first volume of Kino No Tabi (http://www.tokyopop.com/product/1625/KinonoTabi/1) and it was charming and made me smile.

Jeanie
08-29-2007, 10:08 PM
(Side note: The Princess Bride is also like this. The movie is a fairly conventional fantasy story, but the book is both a conventional story and plays with fantasy conventions. If you've only seen the movie, YOU MUST READ THE BOOK.)

Hear, hear! I own a copy of the book and it is just as good as the movie. I hear all the actors in my head as I read all dialogue.

Evil Dead Junkie
08-29-2007, 11:12 PM
Im read this book Cloud Atlas. Very weird. It has a strage structure that jumps around various plots and timelines every 50 pages, but yet is all interconnected. Not finished yet, but highly recommended. SO far....


Oh GOOOODDDD I envy you.

I love David Mitchell, in the words of Aberforth "Sunshine bursts from his every orifice" Read All his books everyone of them savor every page and then grouse that you have to wait three years for his next one, as he releases them on schedule with his damnable British efficency.

Picture Chuck Palinuik with hope, and about ten thousand times better.

I LURVE DAVID MITCHELL

Makkara
08-30-2007, 01:20 AM
This is a criminally underrated book. It tells a beautiful story while also parodying common elments in fantasy stories. If you don't like it, I will loose all respect for you.

Good thing I do like it, then. Actually, I haven't been getting a lot of actual book reading done lately, (Yotsuba&! has been taking up most of that time) so I'm only on chapter... four, I think. It's pretty great so far, though. You have to love Beagle's use of similes. For instance, when he describes a voice as being "like a snake crawling through mud". It makes little sense, especially when taken out of context, but it's brilliantly evocative.

Red Hedgehog
08-30-2007, 03:53 PM
Just finished up Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke which was pretty awesome. Next up, I believe, will by Roth's The Plot Against America or something to that effect.

Evil Dead Junkie
08-30-2007, 08:31 PM
The Plot Against America is overrated.

The bulk of it is great yes. But the ending, well not to give anything away, but did The Sopranoes conclusin piss you off.

Cause if it did you might start straight up killing motherfuckers during the last hundred pages or so of TPAA

Merus
08-30-2007, 08:48 PM
The Sopranos had a conclusion? I thought it just ended.

Evil Dead Junkie
08-30-2007, 08:55 PM
Exactly.

And I LIKE The Sopranoes Ending.

I literally through my copy across the room in frustration when Roth did what he did. 400 pages of masterpiece all undone by a giant steaming turd of awful.

ChelseaQ
09-05-2007, 06:52 PM
I'm rereading the second book in Clive Barker's Abarat series. I hope he hurries up with the third one. This is taking forever.

I seriously second this! I thought maybe he had given up with this!
Anyway, I am working my through Charlaine Harris's Lilly Bard mystery series. I enjoy her Southern Vampire series which is going to become an HBO series directed by the guy that did Six Feet Under, I'm excited.
I am also in the fourth book of the Otori trilogy. It is not nearly as good as the first three so I am having a hard time getting through it.

Anonymooo
09-05-2007, 07:47 PM
I'm currently on Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child's Book of the Dead, having recently re-read all the Pendergast books lately. After that I'll finally get to my friend's copy of Legacy of the Drow that's been sitting in my bookshelf.

sraymonds
09-05-2007, 09:40 PM
I'm currently on Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child's Book of the Dead, having recently re-read all the Pendergast books lately. After that I'll finally get to my friend's copy of Legacy of the Drow that's been sitting in my bookshelf.

The new Pendergast novel, Wheel of Darkness, came out recently. I've picked it up, but I'm not really in the mood to read anything right now.

shivam
09-05-2007, 10:47 PM
currently reading the excellent biography of John Adams by David McCullough.

NoKidding
09-06-2007, 06:13 AM
Just finished up Bone of the Moon by Jonathan Carroll. Man, that guy has the best book titles ever. My favorite is probably "Kissing the Beehive", or maybe "The Wooden Sea", but they are all really great (the books too, not just their names). I think I'll read Everything Is Illuminated next. I hear it's pretty good, and it's been sitting on my shelf for over a year. I got it as an impulse buy on the airport on my way to E3 2006.

Alex Scott
09-06-2007, 08:57 AM
I finished Seven Storey Mountain the other night. It's not often I find a book that so deeply shakes the way I think, but this one did it.

Now I'm working on Andrew Greeley's The Mary Myth, which analyzes the Virgin Mary's function as a symbol. I found it after flipping through a book on goddess traditions that cited Greeley.

Once I'm done with that, I'm starting on To Kill a Mockingbird.

doc_marten_abortion
09-06-2007, 09:39 AM
Stiff. It's an interesting, sometimes funny look at what happens to cadavers after they've been donated to science.

philliam
09-06-2007, 09:41 AM
im reading don dildo's (delillo) Libra

Ophite
09-06-2007, 10:39 AM
George Alec Effinger's When Gravity Fails. Cyberpunk, but set in an interesting Middle Eastern culture instead of the masturbating-over-Japan that the genre tends to inspire.

I like it a lot; it's well-written, I'm a sucker for cyberpunk, and it has a noir/detective aspect that's as much fun as the unusual and well-realized setting. But for some reason I can't fathom, the vast majority of the women are in fact male to female transsexuals. This wouldn't be worth noticing ordinarily, but it happens so much that one wonders where the born-as-women women are, and whether the author has some sort of fetish.

Mightyblue
09-06-2007, 02:20 PM
Just finished up Chris Bunch's The Last Battle. Am now starting Stardust.

Anonymooo
09-06-2007, 03:12 PM
The new Pendergast novel, Wheel of Darkness, came out recently. I've picked it up, but I'm not really in the mood to read anything right now.I'll buy that when it comes out in paperback--Pendergast is the man (Renaissance FBI Ninja!) but he's not a cool-enough character to make me buy a hardback that's not on sale. And I know that feeling--I'll probably stop reading for a little while after I'm done with Book of the Dead. XD

Calorie Mate
09-06-2007, 03:38 PM
I'm going to finish Snow Crash if it kills me. (Seriously, I don't know why it's taking this long to read, I'm genuinely enjoying it.)

Eusis
09-06-2007, 04:13 PM
Sounds like me and half the books I have. I enjoy them, but... Don't feel like reading them for whatever reason.

I got the Fifth Head of Cerberus, I'll at least be reading through the first novella. And I've been meaning to read a Game of Thrones fully since I promised someone I would if he read a book I suggested.

Issun
09-07-2007, 06:48 PM
Bel Canto, by Ann Patchett. I'm about halfway through, but I'm still not sure what I think of it.
Next up: the Mabignogion (a.k.a. the source material for most of Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles).

Healy
09-09-2007, 10:30 AM
The Doctor and the Detective by Martin Booth. It's a biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Pretty interesting stuff.

Evil Dead Junkie
09-09-2007, 10:52 AM
All The Pretty Horses.

Cormac McCarthy is one of my favorite authors, a throw away line for him would be the greatest phrase in another authors career.

shivam
09-09-2007, 01:01 PM
currently working Diamond Age by Stephenson. Its a bit slow to start, but i'm getting into it.

Loki
09-09-2007, 03:31 PM
I enjoyed that one the most out of his "early books."

But be warned it has his useal ending where the story just stops. As long as you know it's coming, it's not so bad.

Radical Ans
09-09-2007, 04:11 PM
I just finished up "The Prestige" by Christopher Priest. I think I liked it more than the movie, which itself was pretty good. Before that I read the Mass Effect novel which was alright. I didn't expect much so I wasn't disappointed. Currently I'm reading through "Coyote Blue" by Christopher Moore. I loved his other books, "Lamb" and "Practical Demon Keeping," so I figured I'd try another.

Crazy Larry
09-16-2007, 11:40 AM
I've started reading through the Malazan: Book Of The Fallen series by Steven Erikson because of all the praise I've heard for it. I've just started the third book, Memories Of Ice, and I'm of two minds concerning it, and the series. When I'm actually reading it it's a compelling read that I find hard to put down. Once I do put it down and think about it though I find myself wondering what is so engrossing about it. The characters are good, but not especially amazing nor all that deep, and one of them is quickly approaching Deus Ex Machina status. The story is coming really close to crossing the line from complex to being a needlessly convoluted, overwrought mess. Finally, the layers upon layers of history and backstory are starting to smell of worldbuilding wankery, and I'm someone who likes the stuff. That said, it'll probably take me all of two days to read through the third book.

cortbassist89
09-16-2007, 11:51 AM
I'm reading Alice in Quantumland: An Allegory of Quantum Physics by Robert Gilmore.

Because I am, as philliam would say, a virgin.

shivam
09-16-2007, 02:26 PM
finished diamond age. what a great story, with a bit of an abrupt ending. It's easily on par with snow crash.

now up, a biography of Mao.

Mightyblue
09-16-2007, 03:09 PM
Just finished Parasite Eve, and I have to say it's much different than the games. The basis is the same, it's just the plot, characters, and setting are very, very different from the games. It's a pretty good, if weird in spots, read in the vein of the more horrific Robin Cook novels.

marcalan
09-16-2007, 07:06 PM
Currently reading Elantris by Brandon Sanderson. Seems that he wrote it to prove that a story could be told in one book.

After this is a toss up: I've got Woad to Wuin by Peter David and Bonehunters, the next Malazan book and a verse translation of Beowulf to go through.

Alex Scott
09-16-2007, 08:04 PM
Just finished To Kill a Mockingbird, and now I'm working on Fast Food Nation and the much shorter Quarks, Chaos, and Christianity.

Daydreamer
09-17-2007, 12:09 AM
On a short story kick - which I highly recommend, because most of them are exactly Lunch-break or post-dinner-drink sized affairs.

True Names and the opening of the cyberspace frontier - Vernor Vinge
Stories of your life and others - Ted Chiang
Heat of Fusion and other stories - John M. Ford

Ben1842
09-17-2007, 01:19 AM
I've been enjoying these. They're not literary mastepieces but they are fun to read.
Written by the author of over 100 Simpsons episodes.

http://www.amazon.com/Time-Machine-Did-John-Swartzwelder/dp/0975579908/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-0497919-0337240?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1190016977&sr=8-1
http://www.amazon.com/How-I-Conquered-Your-Planet/dp/0975579940/ref=pd_bbs_2/105-0497919-0337240?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1190016977&sr=8-2
http://www.amazon.com/Exploding-Detective-John-Swartzwelder/dp/0975579967/ref=pd_bbs_3/105-0497919-0337240?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1190016977&sr=8-3
http://www.amazon.com/Double-Wonderful-John-Swartzwelder/dp/0975579924/ref=pd_bbs_4/105-0497919-0337240?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1190016977&sr=8-4

Hope you all like them. I've only read 2 so far but they where fast and fun reads.

Paul le Fou
09-18-2007, 06:54 PM
I'm currently in the middle of American Psycho. I haven't seen the movie, but the book was a dollar at the thrift store and so far it's been pretty interesting, if not a little heavy-handed.

I also just read Lost at Sea, which as a comic was a one-sitting thing so it's sort of hard to be "currently" reading it, but you know.

Next up, I don't know - between AP and Beasts of No Nation which I just finished, I'm sort of looking for a relatively easy read. No Country for Old Men will probably have to wait... maybe Watership Down or Dress Your Family in Denim and Corduroy.

Figure Four
09-18-2007, 07:23 PM
I just finished Assassination Vacation, which was brilliant. Definitely my favorite Sarah Vowell book. Like most of Vowell's work it's equal parts comedy, history, and emotion. The bit at the end of the first chapter where she visits Lincoln's grave is my favorite thing she's ever wrote.

I tried reading A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, expecting something along the lines of Carl Sagan style science writing, but it pretty much just read like a textbook with way too many exclamation points. I put it away after two chapters and have decided to read The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana by Umberto Eco instead.

Maggie
09-18-2007, 07:29 PM
I've just started reading what looks to be a Silent Hill-y, Shadow Over Innsmouth-y book called The Town that Forgot How to Breathe by.. ah, I don't even remember. I'm too lazy to look it up.

Found it at a bookstore the other day when I had nothing better to do. I find most of my books by virtue of, well, judging books by their cover.

Stiv
09-18-2007, 11:25 PM
Oh god, this is so moderately embarassing. Anyway I'm plowing through three books at once, alternating among them depending on whether or not I want to read something awful and how well my book repairs have gone:

Russian Fairy Tales
The Jungle Books
FURRY! The Best of Anthropmorphic Fiction

Yes, that last one is real. Yes, it's from a real publisher and yes, I found it on a shelf in a store (I found several copies, actually, which freaked me out). Yes, it's as awful as you think it is. I guess I have this disease where I intentionally pay money for things I know are going to be awful (see also: My purchase of Rush's 'Caress of Steel'.)

Balrog
09-20-2007, 08:45 AM
I'm reading Pimp: The Story of My Life by Iceberg Slim. Its been sitting in my bookcase for a while I never got around to reading until now. I'm also 'reading' a book about Tsukioka Yoshitoshi which is more pictures than words but you won't hear me complaining.

Alex Scott
09-20-2007, 11:12 AM
Just finished Fast Food Nation last night, and am thoroughly disgusted with a lot of things now. Starting South of the Border, West of the Sun by Murakami today.

tungwene
09-20-2007, 11:15 AM
I am currently reading Maskerade by Terry Prachett.

Mr. Sensible
09-20-2007, 01:42 PM
Just finished Fast Food Nation last night, and am thoroughly disgusted with a lot of things now.

I love how that book illustrates how the fast food industry is like a little microcosm of everything wrong with capitalism; it just wasn't meant to work on this scale.

Eusis
09-28-2007, 02:23 PM
I'm horrendous at actually sticking to a book. Decided to follow my impulse again, and started reading the Litany of the Long Sun, I'm at page 73.

sraymonds
09-28-2007, 02:27 PM
I'm very slowly reading The Devil You Know by Mike Carey.

shivam
09-28-2007, 02:31 PM
Just finished Elven Exiles 3- Destiny, which is my token dragonlance book of the month, and surprisingly good.

Just started The United States of Arugula, which is a really well told history of the american food revolution in high cuisine starting back in the late 1800s.

liquid
09-28-2007, 05:13 PM
Rereading Cerebus. I'll probably skip Chasing YHWH this time around, and possibly the text bits of Reads.

I've also got a copy of The Torture Garden I've been meaning to read.

Little Sampson
09-28-2007, 06:39 PM
I'm reading The Count of Monte Cristo at the moment which is pure awesome. 1000 pages to go. And then I plan on stealing some of my brother's Vonnegut and Murakami books.

Alex Scott
09-28-2007, 09:21 PM
Finished South of the Border, West of the Sun by Murakami, started on The Sacred Journey by Frederick Buechner yesterday, and Lolita about two hours ago.

Also going through the Psalms in my Book of Common Prayer as kind of a personal devotion.

BEAT
09-28-2007, 09:23 PM
I'm re-reading the man who was thursday.

This guy had the completely insane ending down pat about 60 years before anime was even invented.

Issun
09-29-2007, 08:53 PM
This guy had the completely insane ending down pat about 60 years before anime was even invented.

Are you implying, sir, that:

"TETSUOOOOO!!!!"
"KANAEDAAAAA!!"

Is insane?

locit
09-30-2007, 02:03 PM
Re-reading the Phantom Tollbooth. Currently in the Number Mines.

JohnB
09-30-2007, 02:18 PM
House of God, by Samuel Shem. Classic description of what residency is still (basically) like.

Mightyblue
09-30-2007, 02:24 PM
Shaman's Crossing, by Robin Hobb. First part of a trilogy, and it's set in a kind of Victorian England-era world with the England like country running into trouble as it tries to expand and take over a frontier filled with magic using tribes. It's pretty awesome, just based on atmosphere alone.

Calorie Mate
09-30-2007, 05:12 PM
Hey guys, I finally finished Snow Crash! It was pretty good; I enjoyed it all the way through.

I've now started High Fidelity, and so far it's great.

Sheana
09-30-2007, 09:51 PM
Speaking of finally, I finally finished A Clash Of Kings. I'm now about a 1/3 of the way into A Storm Of Swords.

Paul le Fou
09-30-2007, 09:54 PM
Speaking of finally, I finally finished A Clash Of Kings. I'm now about a 1/3 of the way into A Storm Of Swords.

BETTER HURRY BOOK 5 WILL BE OUT ANY DAY NOW

oh

wait

Red Hedgehog
09-30-2007, 10:16 PM
I've now started High Fidelity, and so far it's great.

Yeah, Nick Hornby is generally great. About A Boy also really good.

shivam
10-02-2007, 10:25 AM
just beat United States of Arugula, and picked up Scott Pilgrim 2, Spook Country, and The mysterious flame of queen loana.

jeditanuki
10-02-2007, 11:45 AM
Reading "Budayeen Nights" which is a bunch of short stories by George Alec Effinger set in his cyberpunk-muslim noir world (which works better than sounds. The first novel, "When Gravity Fails" was Hugo and Nebula-nominated).

Edit: I went back and read some posts and see that Ophite is reading the same stuff. Neato!

Crazy Larry
10-03-2007, 11:50 AM
I'm on book two of Guy Gavriel Kay's Sarantine Mosaic series, and it's quite an refreshing change of pace. It's fantasy, though I hesitate to use that term, as it's extremely light on any fantasy elements, and its setting is basically the Byzantine Empire after the fall of the Roman Empire, but with different names and some minor alterations. Oh, and the hero is a mosaicist, as the title suggests.

Parish
10-03-2007, 11:55 AM
Hey guys, I finally finished Snow Crash! It was pretty good; I enjoyed it all the way through.
I'm on a much-belated cyberpunk catch-up spree. I just finished Neuromancer and am reading Snow Crash. I had a little trouble getting into it, because the present-tense narrative style and "LOL CORPORATIZED AMERICA" felt a bit too precious for their own good, but I've decided that it's actually really good... and alarmingly prescient for a book written in the early '90s.

shivam
10-03-2007, 01:32 PM
Read the Diamond Age when you finish, and you'll be awed at just how much Stephenson understood about where things were heading.

tungwene
10-03-2007, 02:58 PM
I'm currently reading more Discworld; this time Witches Abroad.

I'm on book two of Guy Gavriel Kay's Sarantine Mosaic series, and it's quite an refreshing change of pace. It's fantasy, though I hesitate to use that term, as it's extremely light on any fantasy elements, and its setting is basically the Byzantine Empire after the fall of the Roman Empire, but with different names and some minor alterations. Oh, and the hero is a mosaicist, as the title suggests.You'd probably like most of all of Guy Gavriel Kay's book. Aside from his Fionavar books they're light on magic and heavy on the political intrigue and campaigning. He's got two other unrelated books set in this same AU as Sarantine. The Lions of Al-Rassan is my favorite of the two. It's set in an AU Spain under the control of the AU Moors and my other favorite book of his is Tigana set in a different world based off of Italy and the premise reminds me a lot of Suikoden.

Calorie Mate
10-03-2007, 10:22 PM
I'm on a much-belated cyberpunk catch-up spree. I just finished Neuromancer and am reading Snow Crash. I had a little trouble getting into it, because the present-tense narrative style and "LOL CORPORATIZED AMERICA" felt a bit too precious for their own good, but I've decided that it's actually really good... and alarmingly prescient for a book written in the early '90s.

I had trouble getting into it too, but I'd heard so much good stuff I pushed past that, and I'm glad I did.


That reminds me: when you get to the chapter later in the book describing what it's like forking for the US Government, know that I had to read that whole chapter twice because of how frighteningly accurate it was. Parts were exaggerated, sure, but on the whole it hit a little too close to home.

Figure Four
10-04-2007, 12:52 AM
I finished The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana and it was fantastic. I don't know if I liked it quite as much as The Name of the Rose or Foucault's Pendulum but that was probably because I found this book's area of interest (a history of Italian fascism circa World War 2) mildly less interesting than that of the previous books.

I'm about 25 pages into The Difference Engine by Bruce Sterling and William Gibson. After that I plan to read Vacuum Flowers by Michael Swanwick and then I'll finally get around to reading the Chrestomanci books by Diana Wynne Jones.

Crazy Larry
10-04-2007, 02:22 PM
Le double post

Crazy Larry
10-04-2007, 02:23 PM
You'd probably like most of all of Guy Gavriel Kay's book. Aside from his Fionavar books they're light on magic and heavy on the political intrigue and campaigning. He's got two other unrelated books set in this same AU as Sarantine. The Lions of Al-Rassan is my favorite of the two. It's set in an AU Spain under the control of the AU Moors and my other favorite book of his is Tigana set in a different world based off of Italy and the premise reminds me a lot of Suikoden.

I'll keep that in mind. Unfortunately my library doesn't have any of his other books, and my next book purchase will probably be a few more of the Malazan books.

So instead I've moved on to starting Glen Cook's Instrumentalities of the Night series. I think it might be interesting, but I'm having trouble seeing any plot underneath all of the goofy names.

Radical Ans
10-04-2007, 02:25 PM
I finished The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana and it was fantastic. I don't know if I liked it quite as much as The Name of the Rose or Foucault's Pendulum but that was probably because I found this book's area of interest (a history of Italian fascism circa World War 2) mildly less interesting than that of the previous books.

I'm about 25 pages into The Difference Engine by Bruce Sterling and William Gibson. After that I plan to read Vacuum Flowers by Michael Swanwick and then I'll finally get around to reading the Chrestomanci books by Diana Wynne Jones.

I found The Difference Engine to be rather boring. It didn't really seem to go anywhere.

Issun
10-04-2007, 10:57 PM
Reading some African American/African authors. Currently reading "Fledgling" by Octavia E. Butler (R.I.P.). Loved "Parable of the Sower", and this book is just as wonderfully weird. Next is "Invisible Man" by Ralph Ellison, then "Things Fall Apart". After that, back on my medieval (on yo' ass) kick with some Charlemagne (Roland, et. al).

omgjulianna
10-04-2007, 11:18 PM
Things Fall Apart, I thought, was very enjoyable. I read it my sophomore year of high school, and I think I was the only person in my class who liked it. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

Currently I'm reading The Chamber by John Grisham, simply because I think it's his only novel that I haven't read yet. After that I think I'm going to read Les Miserables by Victor Hugo. Again. I love that novel so much.

Red Hedgehog
10-05-2007, 12:06 AM
Next is "Invisible Man" by Ralph Ellison, then "Things Fall Apart".

Ooh, Invisible Man is great. I really enjoyed that book and the way the author made his point. Things Fall Apart was good, too, though it didn't affect me in the same way.

Paul le Fou
10-05-2007, 11:43 AM
I'm reading Quicksilver, also by Neal "Snow Crash" Stephenson. It's part one of a purportedly 8-part series called the Baroque Cycle - I'm about halfway through and still don't know how to describe it. Best I can describe it is as "historical science fiction" - the science in question is like, Isaac Newton, Gottfried Liebniz, Ben Franklin (all characters in the book so far, though Ben Franklin as a young boy), Natural Philosopher-type stuff. It's... unique. I think it's pretty interesting in the way that Snow Crash was interesting, the way it focused on xenoglossia and ancient linguistics and the like. Though there aren't any computer swordsmen with stupid names in this one.

Yet.

Falselogic
10-05-2007, 01:31 PM
I just finished Larry Niven's RingWorld (http://www.amazon.com/Ringworld-S-F-Masterworks-S-Larry-Niven/dp/0575077026/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-8100056-4446439?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191615897&sr=8-1) this is the first book of Niven's I read. It wasn't bad I just felt like I wasn't in on half the stuff Niven mentions, and then the story never really ends. Otherwise, good fun. I'm now reading The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy (http://www.amazon.com/Israel-Lobby-U-S-Foreign-Policy/dp/0374177724/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-8100056-4446439?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191615995&sr=1-1) by some people. Why? I'm applying for graduate schools, one of the dept. is Poli Sci, figured I need to catch up on things.

I'm always reading Grimm's fairy tales and other folklore things so that I can mock them on my blog. Next on the list is The Humble Little Condom (http://www.amazon.com/Humble-Little-Condom-History/dp/1591025567/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/002-8100056-4446439?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191616102&sr=1-2) by Collier, the history of this prophylactic should be quite interesting. I plan on doing some light reading after this probably The Final Empire (http://www.amazon.com/Final-Empire-Mistborn-Book/dp/0765350386/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/002-8100056-4446439?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191616227&sr=1-2) by Sanderson. Just so you know! :)

Nicholai
10-06-2007, 08:29 PM
Currently I'm reading The Lies of Locke Lamorra by Scott Lynch, but am also working on The Complete Sherlock Holmes and The Three Imposters by Arthur Machen. Everything has been going quite well so far though I haven't been able to put the time in that I would like.

Jeanie
10-19-2007, 01:48 PM
Just finished I Am America (And So Can You!) by Steven Colbert. Pretty funny book, it's like his show but in book form, complete with The Word in the margins and footnotes.

Also the trade version of The Question: Zen and Violence by Denny O'Neal and Denys Cowan. Pretty good stuff, even if it is from '87. Also The Question is just bad ass.

Evil Dead Junkie
10-19-2007, 01:55 PM
Reading Warren Zevon's Oral Biography.

It's a fun book and all, but it's always disheartening to learn that one of your heroes was a wife beating, child ignoring, smack shooting, coke nose.

Lord knows I love me a bit of baccahnalia but this man definitely crossed a few lines.

shivam
10-21-2007, 11:14 PM
I picked up When Gravity Fails based on some of the recs in this thread, and i'm pleasantly surprised at how cool it is. Of course, i'm barely at the beginning, but i like the feel a lot. Those of you who've read it would very likely enjoy Ian McDonald's River of Gods, a cyberpunk novel of sorts set in future india. very very cool book.

Sheana
10-21-2007, 11:20 PM
Going through an A to Z fact book on Victorian London. Partly for research, partly out of general interest.

It's fun to learn about little tidbits. Like how everybody was all about smoking pipes and you were a godless heathen if you smoked cigarettes. 'Cos only the lower classes "smoke paper".

tungwene
10-22-2007, 07:18 AM
I am currently reading 1634: The Baltic War by Eric Flint and somebody else. It's part of AU history revolving around an accident where a modern day West Virginian mining town is transported through time and space to Germany in the midst of the Thirty Years War.

Eusis
10-26-2007, 09:54 PM
Finished the Litany of the Long Sun, I'll be started Epiphany of the Long Sun soon.

keele864
10-28-2007, 04:45 PM
I'm reading Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint. I'm not surprised it was so controversial upon release; it's still really shocking today. Roth is remarkably funny though, and a fantastic writer. I think I'll finish it up tonight as I simply cannot stop reading it. After that, back to At Swim-Two-Birds and The Name of the Wind, which are great as well.

Finished the Litany of the Long Sun, I'll be started Epiphany of the Long Sun soon.

I must say, I really like the end of Litany. I'll be really curious to hear what you think of the Long Sun as a whole.

Alex Scott
10-29-2007, 06:46 PM
I just finished Welcome to the NHK a few minutes ago. I don't believe I have ever read such a dark, nasty, cynical, or depressing novel in my life.* I loved it.

* bear in mind, though, that I have yet to read Left Behind.

Paul le Fou
10-29-2007, 06:59 PM
I gave up on Quicksilver because it was boring as shit. Neal Stephenson, shame on you (for sucking).

I ate up David Sedaris's Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, which started off rather slow, but the later stories were golden.

On to Watership Down.

cortbassist89
10-29-2007, 07:07 PM
I just finished Welcome to the NHK a few minutes ago. I don't believe I have ever read such a dark, nasty, cynical, or depressing novel in my life.* I loved it.

* bear in mind, though, that I have yet to read Left Behind.
Is it evil to be turned on by a Christian book (read: adultery scenes)?

Survey says yes.

Also, I'm reading Dragon Ball vol 1. And screw you guys, I like it.

sraymonds
10-29-2007, 07:13 PM
I just finished Gone, Baby, Gone by Dennis Lehane (because of the new movie directed by Ben Affleck) and it's pretty good, but it puts you in a bummer of a mood. I might read the beginning of that series, or I might read Point of Impact (which inspired the movie Shooter starring Mark Wahlberg).

Octopus Prime
10-29-2007, 07:14 PM
I just finished The Hogfather and am now reading American Gods.

Going from Terry Pratchett to Neil Gaiman is rather jarring...

Gredlen
10-29-2007, 07:23 PM
I'm reading Eiji Yoshikawa's Musashi. I was looking for something to do during my 1.5 hour break between classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays, saw it sitting there in the library, and decided to pick it up. It's a fictionalized account of Miyamoto Musashi's life, and the basis for Vagabond (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vagabond_%28manga%29).

I was initially thinking about picking up Romance of the Three Kingdoms, but I've read a lot of Vagabond recently, so I was curious to see how it stacked up to the book.
Naturally, the book is better. However, the manga is still great and it takes enough liberties with the story to make it almost as different from the book as the book probably is from history.

sraymonds
10-29-2007, 07:24 PM
I was initially thinking about picking up Romance of the Three Kingdoms

Just play the Dynasty Warriors games. They're historically accurate.

Gredlen
10-29-2007, 07:30 PM
Just play the Dynasty Warriors games. They're historically accurate.

Every time the battle at Sekigahara and Sanada Yukimura are mentioned in Musashi, I can't help but think of Samurai Warriors.

Mazian
10-29-2007, 07:37 PM
Going from Terry Pratchett to Neil Gaiman is rather jarring...
Try doing it by way of Good Omens.

Alex Scott
10-29-2007, 08:02 PM
Is it evil to be turned on by a Christian book (read: adultery scenes)?

Survey says yes.
I dunno, Father Andrew Greeley's made a good living for himself writing erotic scenes into his novels. Odd that others I've met know him for his mysteries, while I know him better through his theology.

shivam
10-29-2007, 08:02 PM
Yoshikawa's Taiko is one of my all time favorite books.
It's the story of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and is damned good.

Gredlen
10-29-2007, 08:08 PM
Yoshikawa's Taiko is one of my all time favorite books.
It's the story of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and is damned good.

Heh, maybe I should have started with that and gone chronologically.

Merus
10-29-2007, 09:15 PM
I just finished The Hogfather and am now reading American Gods.

Going from Terry Pratchett to Neil Gaiman is rather jarring...
Those two particular books will do it to you, as they come at the same idea in different ways.

Crazy Larry
10-30-2007, 09:17 AM
Just got done Haruki Murakami's latest, After Dark. Only work of his that I've read that didn't really impress me. Rather disappointing actually.

Paul le Fou
10-30-2007, 09:59 AM
Just got done Haruki Murakami's latest, After Dark. Only work of his that I've read that didn't really impress me. Rather disappointing actually.

Seriously. I love Murakami, but After Dark sucked. Pretty hard, actually.

It's like he was doing a novelization - not of a movie, but of a screenplay. I guess I can't fault him for experimenting, but... man.

Octopus Prime
10-30-2007, 10:01 AM
Those two particular books will do it to you, as they come at the same idea in different ways.

So I managed to get two books with a similar theme by accident?

Merus
10-30-2007, 07:07 PM
Apparently so.

sraymonds
10-30-2007, 07:10 PM
I decided to read Bloodline, the latest novel in the Repairman Jack series.

Jakanden
10-31-2007, 04:28 AM
I just finished up Promise of the Witch King (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/redirect?tag=gp04-20&path=http%3A//www.amazon.com/Promise-Witch-King-Forgotten-Realms/dp/0786938234) and all three volumes of Scott Pilgrim. I am now reading the Battle Royale Ultimate Edition (http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Royale-Ultimate/dp/1427807531/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/002-7219305-0056057?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1193829994&sr=1-2) which is pretty good so far.

Balrog
10-31-2007, 06:15 AM
I'm reading Eiji Yoshikawa's Musashi. I was looking for something to do during my 1.5 hour break between classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays, saw it sitting there in the library, and decided to pick it up. It's a fictionalized account of Miyamoto Musashi's life, and the basis for Vagabond (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vagabond_%28manga%29).


Speaking of Musashi, we were just talking about The Book of Five Rings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Five_Rings) when we were playing Halo 3. How I wish, how I wish you were here...

Gredlen
10-31-2007, 12:06 PM
Speaking of Musashi, we were just talking about The Book of Five Rings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Five_Rings) when we were playing Halo 3. How I wish, how I wish you were here...

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z317/Gredlen/Humorous/11811770030291ke0.jpg

Red Hedgehog
10-31-2007, 05:12 PM
On my cross-country drive, I listened to the audio books of I am America (And so can you!) by Stephen Colbert and World War Z by Max Brooks.

Colbert's book was okay. I laughed, occasionally out loud, but my opinions of the book are the same as that of the show. It's decently entertaining and sometimes funny but not worth going out of your way to see (read).

Brook's book, on the other hand was great. I got it expecting it to be fluff, but it was very well written and gave a realistic portrayal of people going through a zombie apocalypse. Also, the fact that it was individual people giving their oral histories meant each section was read by a different person which added a lot, especially because the voice acting was so good. I really liked it.

ringworm
10-31-2007, 06:50 PM
I'm also a huge fan of World War Z. Another forum I post at chose it as the book club selection, otherwise I never would have bothered.

Stephen
10-31-2007, 09:23 PM
I'm reading Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint. I'm not surprised it was so controversial upon release; it's still really shocking today. Roth is remarkably funny though, and a fantastic writer. I think I'll finish it up tonight as I simply cannot stop reading it.

I'm reading the Zuckerman Bound trilogy right now and I love it. Strangely, I hated Portnoy's Complaint when I read it a few months ago. All that complaining was just too much. I know that complaining (and complaining about complaining and understanding the basis for the complaining) was the point, but it just drove me crazy. It's a book that achieved its goal, only I hated the goal.

Anyway, if you haven't read Zuckerman Bound yet, you've got a lot to look forward to. The second part Zuckerman Unbound is basically a fictional parallel of all the BS that Roth endured after the publication of Portnoy's Complaint. I'm finding it a much more enjoyable read.

jeditanuki
11-01-2007, 06:11 AM
Brook's book, on the other hand was great. I got it expecting it to be fluff, but it was very well written and gave a realistic portrayal of people going through a zombie apocalypse. Also, the fact that it was individual people giving their oral histories meant each section was read by a different person which added a lot, especially because the voice acting was so good. I really liked it.

Unfortunately the audiobook, while well made, is abridged. You don't miss any real plot, per se. However, you miss a lot of 'flavor'.

Merus
11-01-2007, 07:09 AM
I am just about to start the new Matthew Reilly book. He is a very silly author.

Crazy Larry
11-01-2007, 05:36 PM
On my cross-country drive, I listened to the audio books of I am America (And so can you!) by Stephen Colbert and World War Z by Max Brooks.

Colbert's book was okay. I laughed, occasionally out loud, but my opinions of the book are the same as that of the show. It's decently entertaining and sometimes funny but not worth going out of your way to see (read).

I found I Am America (And So Can You! to be pretty funny, but the whole way the book was set up just seems like they took segments they were going to use for the show and transplanted them into a book.

Maggie
11-03-2007, 12:48 AM
I'm reading Mister B. Gone by Clive Barker. It's sort of stream-of-conciousness and has no chapters, so it's a really quick read.

There seems to be one fundamental problem with its main, ah, gimmick, but Clive's pretty clever, so I don't know if he'll adress it or not.

Violentvixen
11-03-2007, 07:08 PM
I ate up David Sedaris's Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, which started off rather slow, but the later stories were golden.

On to Watership Down.

Have you read Me Talk Pretty One Day? I think that's the better Sedaris book.

Watership Down is really good. I read a lot of the Redwall series before this, but Watership is much better.

I found Colbert's book for $15 at Costco today so I picked it up.

Is anyone here on goodreads.com? I like it a lot.

estragon
11-03-2007, 07:51 PM
a realistic portrayal of people going through a zombie apocalypse

Riiiiiight.

(I know what you mean, but this was not a phrase I ever expected to read. Thank you.)

Paul le Fou
11-03-2007, 10:11 PM
Is anyone here on goodreads.com? I like it a lot.

I am! http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/95517

Eusis
11-03-2007, 10:17 PM
I decided to peek on goodreads.com myself, here's my account. (http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/598803)

Violentvixen
11-04-2007, 10:33 AM
Here's mine. (http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/176377)

Red Hedgehog
11-04-2007, 06:22 PM
Riiiiiight.

(I know what you mean, but this was not a phrase I ever expected to read. Thank you.)

Yeah, I realized immediately after writing it that I could have worded that sentence better.

Mightyblue
11-04-2007, 06:37 PM
I've been on a bit of a L.E. Modesitt Jr. binge lately. I've read his newest couple books recently, and I've been going back and reading some more of his back catalog, especially the Recluce books. For some reason, I just like his writing style, and the way he weaves personal development and plot development.

That, and considering a major facet of his books is ethics, especially concerning the usage of power, they tend to make you think. Generally whenever I'm facing a particularly sticky personal or work problem I'll leaf through a couple of his books and use the questions prompted within the books to get me to resolve my own conflicts.

jeditanuki
11-05-2007, 06:14 AM
Finished the first volume of Maus last night. Starting on the second tonight. Over the weekend I read the collected Infinite Crisis and the first two volumes of the new Blue Beetle. I also started the Colbert book.

Stephen
11-05-2007, 06:31 AM
Breezed through the new Terry Pratchett book Making Money this weekend. There isn't much to say about it, other than it was a solid Discworld novel. Next up is Douglas Coupland's new one The Gum Thief. I've never read anything by Coupland before, but I've heard lots of nice stuff about him. The book jacket makes the plot sound a little creepy though (a middle-aged guy writes a mock diary about Bethany, his office supply store coworker).

Evil Dead Junkie
11-06-2007, 02:37 PM
Read Slam, Hornby's best novel in years, which unfortunately means its tolerable rather then aggressively painful.

Starting No Country, I want to reread it before I see the movie. I remember it being pretty great if not top tier McCarthy (Keeping in mind that in my mind Top Tier McCarthy is among the best stuff in literature period. Equaling if not surpassing Faulkner)

Evil Dead Junkie
11-06-2007, 02:49 PM
Set up a good reads account for myself.

http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/605328

Jakanden
11-06-2007, 03:44 PM
Just finished Samurai: The code of the warrior (http://www.amazon.com/Samurai-Code-Warrior-Thomas-Louis/dp/0760784027) and I am waiting for my Amazon order of the His Dark Materials (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/His_Dark_Materials) trilogy to come in. I am also picking up Scott Pilgrim Vol 4 this weekend.

philliam
11-07-2007, 07:56 AM
I just finished Don Delillo's Libra and am now starting East of Eden by John Steinbeck.

I am enjoying this book.

MoltenBoron
11-07-2007, 08:03 AM
I'm mid-way through Volume II of Persepolis, which is a lot of fun and makes for light reading before bedtime.

Evil Dead Junkie
11-07-2007, 08:52 AM
I just finished Don Delillo's Libra and am now starting East of Eden by John Steinbeck.

I am enjoying this book.


Don Delillo indimidates me, any recomendation for a good starter book?

Paul le Fou
11-07-2007, 09:38 AM
I'm mid-way through Volume II of Persepolis, which is a lot of fun and makes for light reading before bedtime.

Oof. Nothing lulls one to sleep like getting slammed with injustice and oppression.

Did you know they made a Persepolis animated movie? It should be coming out this winter. I can't wait, personally.

Red Hedgehog
11-07-2007, 09:40 AM
I just finished The Plot Against America by Philip Roth. I enjoyed it and thought he did a great job of showing how America could have descended into fascism and antisemitism in the late 30s/early 40s. I found the ending abrupt - not in how the fascism was overcome because that made sense to me, but in resolution for the characters (i.e. there wasn't much).

MoltenBoron
11-07-2007, 09:47 AM
I just finished The Plot Against America by Philip Roth. I enjoyed it and thought he did a great job of showing how America could have descended into fascism and antisemitism in the late 30s/early 40s. I found the ending abrupt - not in how the fascism was overcome because that made sense to me, but in resolution for the characters (i.e. there wasn't much).

Oh, I just got The Plot Against America and was planning to start it next. Have you read It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis? It's a work in a similar vein about creeping fascism in America during the Great Depression, although it was written in the 1930s so it had a bit more immediacy and was more directly political. It's also not a fantastic literary work, but it's a fun pot-boiler if dystopia is your thing.

Evil Dead Junkie
11-07-2007, 09:50 AM
I just finished The Plot Against America by Philip Roth. I enjoyed it and thought he did a great job of showing how America could have descended into fascism and antisemitism in the late 30s/early 40s. I found the ending abrupt - not in how the fascism was overcome because that made sense to me, but in resolution for the characters (i.e. there wasn't much).

I literally threw my copy of The Plot Against America across the room when I got to the end. That's the dumbest fucking Deus Ex Machina I've ever read. Ruined the book for me, flat out retarded. And for a book about Intolerance it sure had a nasty Anti Catholic streak.

MoltenBoron
11-07-2007, 09:50 AM
Oof. Nothing lulls one to sleep like getting slammed with injustice and oppression.

Did you know they made a Persepolis animated movie? It should be coming out this winter. I can't wait, personally.

Well, you know. Not light in terms of theme, but light in terms of nice pictures and quick reading.

Persepolis the movie sounds intriguing. Is it getting a theatrical release?

Paul le Fou
11-07-2007, 12:45 PM
Well, you know. Not light in terms of theme, but light in terms of nice pictures and quick reading.

Persepolis the movie sounds intriguing. Is it getting a theatrical release?

Yeah. Theatrical release on Christmas Day this year. It'll probably be limited so I hope you've got an arthouse nearby. Looks like it won the Jury Prize at Cannes this year, too, which is pretty awesome.

I guess the government of Iran is none too happy about it (wonder why) but they don't seem to be doing much about it. I, uh, sort of doubt it will play in Iran though, or probably many other places with Islamic governments.

For those of you just tuning in, Persepolis is an autobiographical graphic novel about a girl growing up in Iran through the Islamic revolution, the war with Iraq and more. In America it comes in two volumes and I high recommend it.

jeditanuki
11-07-2007, 12:55 PM
Has anyone read any of Satrapi's other works? I liked Persepolis 1 and 2 well enough, and was wondering about the others.

Evil Dead Junkie
11-07-2007, 01:02 PM
Yeah. Theatrical release on Christmas Day this year. It'll probably be limited so I hope you've got an arthouse nearby. Looks like it won the Jury Prize at Cannes this year, too, which is pretty awesome.

I guess the government of Iran is none too happy about it (wonder why) but they don't seem to be doing much about it. I, uh, sort of doubt it will play in Iran though, or probably many other places with Islamic governments.

For those of you just tuning in, Persepolis is an autobiographical graphic novel about a girl growing up in Iran through the Islamic revolution, the war with Iraq and more. In America it comes in two volumes and I high recommend it.

I loved Persepolis but was quite disappointed with volume 2. I suppose you have to give her credit for not filtering her narrative. But she did some pretty unexcusable things in the book, like you know sentence a stranger to torture.

Red Hedgehog
11-07-2007, 01:39 PM
Have you read It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis? It's a work in a similar vein about creeping fascism in America during the Great Depression, although it was written in the 1930s so it had a bit more immediacy and was more directly political. It's also not a fantastic literary work, but it's a fun pot-boiler if dystopia is your thing.

My dad gave that to me some time when I was in high school, but I never got around to reading it. I do enjoy dystopia, so perhaps I'll brink the copy still in my parents' place back with me when I head back.

I literally threw my copy of The Plot Against America across the room when I got to the end. That's the dumbest fucking Deus Ex Machina I've ever read. Ruined the book for me, flat out retarded. And for a book about Intolerance it sure had a nasty Anti Catholic streak.

I find it odd to consider it a Deus Ex Machina since the characters never really had any control over what was happening to them. Still, the way the writing style changed and then he basically just said "THE END" in large letters without actually ending the book was annoying.

And what was the Anti Catholic streak? I missed that.

Evil Dead Junkie
11-07-2007, 01:51 PM
Alot of the stuff about the Nun's in the neighborhood, and a few jabs at some influential priests.

I do consider it to be a Deus Ex Machina though because the event in question happens, and more or less solves everything but the resentment.

Dizzy
11-07-2007, 04:24 PM
Don Delillo indimidates me, any recomendation for a good starter book?

Stay away from Cosmopolis. I gave it three tries and even had my Special Ed. teacher read the book to me during nap time at school.

Cosmopolis was my mistake and I am now psychologically crippled from reading any of his books or even taking him seriously. If I could turn the wheels of time, I'd start out with what philliam read, Libra. Others:

- Underworld
- White Noise

Though Mao II and The Names are crushing bores like Cosmopolis, or so I've heard.

I am currently reading nothing. Though I hope to find time to read Thomas Bernhard's Old Masters, or maybe even Tim Allen Laid Bare: Unauthorized.

Red Hedgehog
11-07-2007, 04:42 PM
Alot of the stuff about the Nun's in the neighborhood, and a few jabs at some influential priests.

Huh, I chalked the nun stuff up to typical childhood fears about others/the unknown. And was there more about priests other than mentioning the Detroit guy who had the antisemitic radio show? The only other priest I remember mentioned was Flanagan who was presented in a very positive way. But then, being Jewish I probably have a different perspective on reading it than you do.

Paul le Fou
11-07-2007, 05:37 PM
White Noise is the only Don DeLillo book I've read and it really did nothing for me. But my roommate loved it, anyway, so take that as you will.

MoltenBoron
11-07-2007, 05:41 PM
Huh, I chalked the nun stuff up to typical childhood fears about others/the unknown. And was there more about priests other than mentioning the Detroit guy who had the antisemitic radio show? The only other priest I remember mentioned was Flanagan who was presented in a very positive way. But then, being Jewish I probably have a different perspective on reading it than you do.

As mentioned above, I haven't read the book, so I'm just shooting in the dark on this, but is the Detroit priest with a radio show Father Coughlin? Because he was a real guy who had a radio show, and who was overtly antisemitic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Coughlin).

Red Hedgehog
11-07-2007, 07:05 PM
As mentioned above, I haven't read the book, so I'm just shooting in the dark on this, but is the Detroit priest with a radio show Father Coughlin? Because he was a real guy who had a radio show, and who was overtly antisemitic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Coughlin).

Yeah, and Flanagan is Father Flanagan who ran a center for homeless boys. The book is historical fiction, or rather alternate history fiction, so most of the non-main characters existed in the real world (like FDR and Charles Lindbergh).

shivam
11-07-2007, 07:08 PM
White Noise is the only Don DeLillo book I've read and it really did nothing for me. But my roommate loved it, anyway, so take that as you will.

i love white noise. but its a book written more or less explicitly for literature critics and college professors.

Excalibrate
11-07-2007, 11:05 PM
I'm reading The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. I'm a bit of a philosophy buff.

I'm also in the middle of The Wastelands: Dark Tower 3, Myst: The Book of D'ni, and Light in August. I'm not trying to one-up anybody, I just get distracted too easily. I haven't touched Light in August in weeks. They're all really good books, though, in their own ways. Maybe I'll finish one of them someday soon. :D

Evil Dead Junkie
11-07-2007, 11:42 PM
I'm reading The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. I'm a bit of a philosophy buff.



Anytime someone I know reads an Ayn Rand novel I just cross them out of my Address book for six months. Because that's the exact amount of time that the book will turn them into an asshole. They come to in a black turtleneck with a pack of clove cigarettes in there pocket and grogily ask me where they've been.

Figure Four
11-07-2007, 11:52 PM
I just finished up the first four Chrestomanci books and I quite enjoyed them. Good, funny, and clever some of the best children's fantasy that I've ever read. I did kind of have a bit of an, "Oh shit!" moment today when I realized there were no cats in the fourth book.

Now I'm reading The Hobbit for the first time since sixth grade. It's kind of an odd book to go back to after reading Lord of the Rings multiple times.

After that it's kind of up in the air. I've got a copy of Homicide by David Simon (I've been making my way through The Wire, but that's another thread) on hold at work but I'm not going to pick it up until we get our employee appreciation day at the end of the month. I'll swing by the used bookstore on Friday and see if I can find anything that strikes my interest.

MoltenBoron
11-08-2007, 09:14 AM
My dad gave [It Can't Happen Here to me some time when I was in high school, but I never got around to reading it. I do enjoy dystopia, so perhaps I'll brink the copy still in my parents' place back with me when I head back.

Speaking of dystopia, I realized something as I started reading The Plot Against America last night. I received five books for my birthday a few weeks ago: The Plot Against America, Persepolis 2, The Handmaid's Tale, Ha'Penny, and The Man in the High Castle. All books about oppressive totalitarian regimes, 4 of them dystopias, 3 of them alternate futures built around World War II. I don't remember thinking about this specifically when I asked for the books, so either it's a coincidence or something was running through my subconscious at the time.

philliam
11-08-2007, 10:53 AM
i love white noise. but its a book written more or less explicitly for literature critics and college professors.

I'm not a literature critic nor a college professor, but I really enjoyed that book.

Also, I am going to read Underworld but hoo boy, that book might take awhile.

Also, I would recommend reading Libra as a starter for Don since I think that's his most accessible book.

My first Don Delillo book was in fact his first book, Americana, and it took me awhile to get into him.

shivam
11-08-2007, 10:59 AM
Delillo is the essence of post modernist literature, and he's always been hit or miss with me. White Noise, though, man, what a fun book.

philliam
11-08-2007, 11:18 AM
Delillo is the essence of post modernist literature, and he's always been hit or miss with me. White Noise, though, man, what a fun book.

Delillo is so post modern it hurts. As in a lot of people get really angry when they try to read his books

Dizzy
11-08-2007, 03:05 PM
What the cliches of "postmodern" again?

Falselogic
11-11-2007, 06:40 PM
Norman Mailer died yesterday.The man won two Pulitzers and was the voice of American Literature for a generation. Certainly not my generation, but you know...

Jeanie
11-11-2007, 07:47 PM
Been a busy two weeks for me, reading-wise. In the Graphic Novel area, I read The Immortal Iron Fist by Ed Brubaker and David Aja. Pretty awesome fight scenes and Orson Randall, the previous Iron Fist, was pure coolness.

In the Novel area, I read the first two parts of the Codex Alera series by Jim Butcher, author of The Dresdan Files. It's an interesting fantasy with some minor twists on the Monomyth Clishe's that make work well and the Roman inspired setting is somewhat unique. Finally I read Karen Traviss' latest Republic Commando Series entry.

Falselogic
11-11-2007, 07:56 PM
As to what I'm actually reading... I'm on volume 7 of Bill Willington's comic series Fables, which is a great series. I'm not in to super heroes and what not but Willington's ability to take fairy tale figures and make them compelling characters in the modern world keeps me turning pages... The first comics I've read since Sandman

I'm reading Unruly Americans as well, a history of how the constitution got written and why the confederation failed.

Excalibrate
11-11-2007, 11:06 PM
Anytime someone I know reads an Ayn Rand novel I just cross them out of my Address book for six months. Because that's the exact amount of time that the book will turn them into an asshole. They come to in a black turtleneck with a pack of clove cigarettes in there pocket and grogily ask me where they've been.

XD Smart move. I think I acted a bit stuck-up for a day or two, but then I thought, "What the hell am I doing?" It's convincing for a while, until you realize that what you really want is to not lose all of your friends. I think Ayn Rand missed that loophole in her philosophy; if we should live according to our selfish desires, then what do we do if we want to be sociable and considerate to others? It's an interesting story, but I think I'll leave it at that.
Thankfully, I didn't have a chance to start the black turtleneck phase. God help me if I ever do. :D

I didn't mean to take so long to respond, but undiagnosed ADD takes up a lot of my time.

Daydreamer
11-12-2007, 12:25 AM
Less Ayn Rand, more Andrew Ryan

Excalibrate
11-12-2007, 01:08 PM
Less Ayn Rand, more Andrew Ryan

Dude, you have made my day. I never made that connection until you brought it up. Thank you. XD Bioshock is nothing short of brilliant...
But yeah, back to books...by other authors...

Maybe I'll make an Andrew Ryan/Ayn Rand thread later.

Jakanden
11-12-2007, 01:17 PM
Dude, you have made my day. I never made that connection until you brought it up. Thank you. XD Bioshock is nothing short of brilliant...

It is surprising how many people have no idea about the connection, even those familar with the source material.

When you take into account characters such as Andrew Ryan and Atlas, the Objectivist society and the concepts of iIndividualism vs Collectivism, you cannot help but see the influence.

That being said, I still cannot stand Ayn Rand, but I did love what Bioshock did with her ideas.

Five0two
11-13-2007, 01:20 AM
Been a busy two weeks for me, reading-wise. In the Graphic Novel area, I read The Immortal Iron Fist by Ed Brubaker and David Aja. Pretty awesome fight scenes and Orson Randall, the previous Iron Fist, was pure coolness.

In the Novel area, I read the first two parts of the Codex Alera series by Jim Butcher, author of The Dresdan Files. It's an interesting fantasy with some minor twists on the Monomyth Clishe's that make work well and the Roman inspired setting is somewhat unique. Finally I read Karen Traviss' latest Republic Commando Series entry.
I'm still waiting for volume three of Codex Alera - it's a good series. I destroyed
the Dresden books as they came out, always casting about for more. Very entertaining.
Recently I finished Glen Cook's "Black Company" series - 9 novels anthologized into four volumes. Really good military fantasy.
Also read several of the George R.R. Martin-edited "Wild Cards" books, as well as his "Tuf Voyaging" collection.
I read for entertainment, and am most drawn to sci-fi, science fiction (they are different), some fantasy, and a smattering of mystery and horror.

So what's this goodreads place? A place for book-nerds?!? Might have to have a look.

Crazy Larry
11-13-2007, 11:34 AM
I'm reading The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. I'm a bit of a philosophy buff.

That's the funniest thing I've read in a while.

Evil Dead Junkie
11-14-2007, 08:34 AM
Just finished Lunar Park. A devastingly funny, genuinely scary, and unexpectedly moving book from Bret Easton Ellis.

Shame it doesn't stick the landing.

Jakanden
11-14-2007, 08:53 AM
Started reading The Golden Compass and I am loving it. I have all three books in the series so I plan to go through all of them in a row.

Alex Scott
11-14-2007, 12:25 PM
Currently: Crime and Punishment, by Dostoevsky.

Next up on the Queue: Skipping Towards Armageddon: The Politics and Propaganda of the Left Behind Novels and the LaHaye Empire, by Michael Standaert.

Bathroom Breaks: A Wing and a Prayer, by Katharine Jefferts Schori, the current Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church.

MoltenBoron
11-18-2007, 08:40 AM
Finished The Plot Against America, I'm starting on The Handmaid's Tale, but it isn't quite taking yet. I've been pretty busy though, without a lot of free time for reading, so that's a factor. I was able to get through The Plot Against America pretty quickly because I had a couple of long train and bus trips to read it on last week.

I'm ambivalent about The Plot Against America. I found the ending unsatisfying and was constantly disabused of my willing suspension of disbelief by the implausible alternate history, yet at the same time I found it compelling and readable. I can think of all kinds of specific complaints about the book, but I still have a generally positive feeling about it.

As alternate histories go, my favorite is still Farthing by Jo Walton. It presents an alternate history of England continuing to appease Hitler during World War II, but does it without painfully obvious exposition. It starts out as an English country house mystery with implications of an alternate timeline in the background, and fluidly transitions by the book's end to mostly an alternate history with small amounts of mystery remaining.

Why is it that alternate histories seem to gravitate towards World War II? Granted, the example of Nazi Germany presents a fine jumping-off point for fables of democracies gone to the dark side, but still. What about World War I? The Russian Revolution? The Berlin Airlift? The Cuban Missile Crisis? The Kennedy Assassination? And those are just in the 20th Century.

Figure Four
11-18-2007, 10:05 AM
I am bit more than halfway through Right as Rain by George Pelecanos. I picked it up because he was a staff writer on The Wire and I've quickly become obsessed with that show. It's pretty good so far, the plot isn't setting my world on fire but I really like the main characters. (In my mind Strange is played by Clarke Peters (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0676370/) and Quinn is played by Lee Tergesen (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0855564/).)

Next: War of the Flowers by Tad Williams.

Also, I'm thinking about reading Robin Hobb. Does anyone have a suggestion as to which of her trilogies I should start with?

Mightyblue
11-18-2007, 10:21 AM
The latest one she's working on (Soldier's Son) isn't done yet, but the first book is pretty good.

LancerDragoon
11-18-2007, 11:33 AM
Going through this thread, it seems like my reading list matches up with some of you guys. I just finished High Fidelity, after reading American Gods and am trying to make my way through Don Delilo's Underworld, while also attempting to read Fiona Campbell's Death of a Salaryman. Man, that book moves at such a glacial pace I'm tempted to just throw in the towel. Has anyone even heard of it? No one else on goodreads seem to have read it.

Oh, here's my account, if anyone's interested. Link (http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/615377).

shivam
11-18-2007, 11:59 AM
Robin Hobb's Assassin Trilogy and Fool's trilogy are fantastic, and her liveship traders trilogy not so much.

And tad williams is a great choice, as long as you're willing to wait for the pay off, as his books universally start very slowly.

Gredlen
11-18-2007, 03:19 PM
I have finished Musashi. I liked it a lot. The last handful of chapters particularly pleased me with the way certain characters turned out. I'm really interested to see how Vagabond will turn out, though, given the differences between the two.

I checked the school library and they don't seem to have Taiko. I did see it at Borders for $35, but that's a little bit more than I'm willing to spend at the moment. I read the first couple of chapters, though, and I'll definitely pick it up sometime.

Mightyblue
11-18-2007, 05:14 PM
To the Lighthouse ATM, but I'm getting sort of tired of Victorian era novels. We're supposed to be reading On The Road next though, so yay hippies! For my own edification I want to track down some Sun Tzu and The Book of the Five Rings. I know the U bookstore has Art of War, but no Five Rings, so that means a hunting trip.

reibeatall
11-18-2007, 05:19 PM
I just got Fables Vol 1 and 2. I hope it's good.

marcalan
11-19-2007, 12:16 PM
Depends Reibeatall, how attached are you to Snow White, Cinderella, and the rest?

I recently read the latest and so far, the series has yet to disappoint me.

Currently, I'm reading Vampire Hunter D: Journey to the North Sea.

Jakanden
11-19-2007, 12:21 PM
I have finished Musashi. I liked it a lot. The last handful of chapters particularly pleased me with the way certain characters turned out. I'm really interested to see how Vagabond will turn out, though, given the differences between the two.

That is good to hear as this is on my shelf right now to be read right after I finish the His Dark Materials trilogy.

valhalladeath
11-19-2007, 12:23 PM
I know a lot of people on these boards don't care for Terry Goodkind, but the Sword of Truth series is one of my favorites. I just got my copy of Confessor today in the mail; It's the final book in the series. I can't wait to read it!

reibeatall
11-19-2007, 12:26 PM
I know a lot of people on these boards don't care for Terry Goodkind, but the Sword of Truth series is one of my favorites. I just got my copy of Confessor today in the mail; It's the final book in the series. I can't wait to read it!

I really loved the Sword of Truth books, until Pillars of Creation. Faith of the Fallen was an incredible story, and then to get into Pillars, I just couldn't handle it. I think I got a hundred pages into it, put it down, and haven't tried to get into the series again.

valhalladeath
11-19-2007, 12:30 PM
Yes, Pillars of Creation was a turd. Faith of the Fallen and Stone of Tears were by far my favorite books in the series. Goodkind had a bit of a lull there in the series where he got way too philosophical with Richard's character and not enough action. The last two books have gotten quite a bit better and it looks like this book is going to be a good finale to the series--or at least I am hoping it is.

shivam
11-19-2007, 12:46 PM
goodkind was good for the first three or four, but man, his hardcore randian capitalist american S&M rape fantasy knock off of robert jordan's wheel of time got real old real fast. Its like he can't tell a story without rape and mysoginy and hating commies.

Paul le Fou
11-19-2007, 01:02 PM
Its like he can't tell a story without rape and mysoginy and hating commies.

I thought we weren't talking about Ayn Rand anymore.