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Ethan
12-22-2009, 07:36 PM
I am a single malt Scotch man. I lean toward the smokier varieties that are made in the islands. I am a man alone in my circle of Bourbon-drinker friends, but may become initiated into that universe as well. Despite being twentysomethings making twentysomething type money, we talk about $50+ bottles of spirits shockingly often.

So I wondered to myself, "does anyone else on Talking Time like any of these old man drinks?"

benjibot
12-22-2009, 08:24 PM
I respect your position, but I am a bourbon man myself. Something about a liquor from Kentucky entices me. That said, I know much less about liquor than I'd like.

Alixsar
12-22-2009, 09:06 PM
Whiskey is the best thing ever. A customer came into work today to return a bottle of whiskey (I forget the brand) because it had one of those bottles where only a few drops came out at a time. I told him that was how it was supposed to be, because you're only supposed to drink a glass at a time and savor the flavor, and he looked at me funny. "But I can't get drunk easily that way." Yes, well...that's true, I suppose.

Anyway, J&B Scotch Blended Whiskey is my drink of choice since it strikes the right balance of affordability and awesomeness. I'd love to drink Macallan or Blue Label or some other expensive crap all the time, but I can't always afford that, you know? Jameson's is pretty good too and in the same price range.

Stiv
12-22-2009, 09:13 PM
Scotch, man. Nothing beats a fine bottle of Laphroig or Oban, which I realize are kind of on the exact opposite ends of the flavor spectrum, although I do prefer smokier scotches. Once I had some 21-year Jura that blew my mind which is kind of amazing considering that their younger scotches are all extremely terrible.

You want to talk old man drinks, though? My favorite mixed drink is a gin gimlet. No bartender under the age of 40 (in my experience) knows how to make one.

StriderDL
12-22-2009, 09:50 PM
Macallan 18-year is the finest scotch I have ever quaffed. Smooth, with fruity notes and a hint of smoke, though it'll give your wallet a decimating crotch kick.

So far as bourbon goes, I just tried some Knob Creek Kentucky bourbon yesterday, and it was damn smooth. A sight better than Maker's, in my opinion. I've never tried any of that Canadian stuff, so I can't give any opinions there.

Old man drinks? Nothing finer than a whiskey old-fashioned, says I!

ArugulaZ
12-22-2009, 10:07 PM
I've had both, and wasn't fond of either. There's an unpleasant woody flavor to the beverage and I just can't seem to acquire a taste for it. Having said that, I would rather drink whiskey than scotch, which tastes like a mouthful of dirt and moss. I prefer gin to either scotch or whiskey, which is odd because gin tastes like pine sap, which is something you'd never want to drink under normal circumstances.

You know what's a really kick-ass hard liquor? Rum. I swear by it. So sweet, so spicy, so buttery smooth! My former favorite was Captain Morgan, but after trying a rum and coke with Bacardi I'll probably buy that brand instead from this point forward.

nadia
12-22-2009, 10:29 PM
I'm not huge into hard whisky, but I do enjoy a good scotch with a beer chaser. I had some 18-year-old Chivas at my grandfather-in-law's house last Christmas...hoo-whee. As he said, "Just like drinkin' Pepsi Cola."

Paul le Fou
12-22-2009, 11:26 PM
You want to talk old man drinks, though? My favorite mixed drink is a gin gimlet. No bartender under the age of 40 (in my experience) knows how to make one.

I am (well, was) a bartender under the age of 40 and I know how to make one. I know how to drink them, too (i.e. frequently.)


Also, I like scotch but I have to be in a good mood for it. And I don't like the cheap stuff, but I am cheap, so I ultimately don't drink it all that much. Something like Johnnie Walker Red strikes a good balance of price/quality I think.

But less expensive (i.e. non-scotch) whiskey is my go-to drink in the winter as a simple mixer.

Matchstick
12-23-2009, 12:22 AM
I don't really drink, but when we were in Ireland, we stopped at the Bushmills Distillery and took a tour. As part of it, we got to sample some things and we ended up bringing home a bottle of original stuff. I can't say that I like it, but I've knocked back a couple on various special occasions. *shudders*

Pombar
12-23-2009, 03:25 AM
My brother's a big whiskey man, but I'm even more of an old man who prefers a flask of brandy on a chill night.
Whiskey's a close second, though.

Gwrrrk
12-23-2009, 04:18 AM
I drink a lot of rye whiskey, since there is so much if it around here to choose from. A lot of people like crown royal, but I couldn't really care much for it. I'd probably prefer forty creek or wisers whiskey more.

Can't say I've tried that much scotch, just some cheaper brands that I can't remember the name of. Same with bourbon.

I also wish that the maple syrup and whiskey blends were sold outside of Quebec. That stuff is delicious :(

Ethan
12-23-2009, 04:59 AM
Best Scotch I've ever had was either the quarter-casked Laphroaig that I bought in the duty free shop on the way home from Korea, or Talisker 10, which I have only had a glass of in a bar once. Yesterday I was at a big wine & spirit warehouse store in Chicago that does their own handpicked bottlings sometimes, and I came dangerously close to spending way too much money on an exclusive 18-year Laphroaig. Then I remembered that I am 26.

It's odd... I don't get drunk, and will usually stop drinking as soon as I feel the earliest effects of alcohol, and this is just how it's always been for me, so I really have zero experience with "everyday" stuff like Jack Daniels, Jim Beam, Chivas Regal, Johnnie Walker, etc. I was introduced to this stuff strictly through special social events/celebrations where people saw fit to bring really good bottles and I forced myself to partake in order to not seem like a dick, so I really only developed a taste for... uh... second-to-top-shelf and up. I should probably try some of the widely available blended Scotches just so I can understand the difference.

Dadgum Roi
12-23-2009, 05:31 AM
You know what's a really kick-ass hard liquor? Rum. I swear by it. So sweet, so spicy, so buttery smooth! My former favorite was Captain Morgan, but after trying a rum and coke with Bacardi I'll probably buy that brand instead from this point forward.

I used to like rum, but having Cuban rum spoiled it for me. That bottle of 20 year old Havana Club was the best liquor that I've ever drank neat.

I've never gotten scotch. It's alright, but I prefer bourbon by a mile, or moonshine if I can get it.

Pombar
12-23-2009, 05:36 AM
I like rum mixed, but don't really find it all that appealing straight. Brandy is the opposite! Nothing should be allowed to dilute it. Even spiced, I'm not really a straight-rum drinker. I guess I only really like the light stuff.

Ethan
12-23-2009, 05:42 AM
My only experience with rum is the high end Guatemalan rum that my neighbor sometimes brings out when we're hanging out on our shared back deck. Delicious, but I have no perspective to really describe it.

Dadgum Roi
12-23-2009, 05:46 AM
Nothing should be allowed to dilute it. Even spiced, I'm not really a straight-rum drinker. I guess I only really like the light stuff.

Most rum is shit if you drink it neat. You should be able to get Havana Club in the UK- the 7 year old is reasonably priced, or was reasonably priced, 10 years ago, in South America. The oldest one is either 15 or 20 years old IIRC and is very smooth and easy to drink. Very much unlike any other rum you've had before, I guarantee.

Marfy
12-23-2009, 06:36 AM
Most rum is shit if you drink it neat. You should be able to get Havana Club in the UK- the 7 year old is reasonably priced, or was reasonably priced, 10 years ago, in South America. The oldest one is either 15 or 20 years old IIRC and is very smooth and easy to drink. Very much unlike any other rum you've had before, I guarantee.

Huh. I'll keep my eye out for it.

Sadly, most of my whiskey experience in Scotland has been bargain priced Jack & Cokes. I had some Highland Park single malt awhile back though, and it was amazing.

If you don't know anything about whiskey and are ever in Edinburgh, go to the Scotch Whisky Experience. It's super touristy and a little expensive but informative, and you can figure out what kind of scotch is right for you without buying your weight in mini-bottles (like me!). And you get a super classy scotch tasting glass out of it!

benjibot
12-23-2009, 07:42 AM
I've never gotten scotch. It's alright, but I prefer bourbon by a mile, or moonshine if I can get it.

I like you. Let's be friends.

Moonshine was available at three weddings I attended in quick succession. It was supposed to be at mine too, but apparently my friend's source was dry.

Gwrrrk
12-23-2009, 07:48 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/Spencish/jameson-whiskey.jpg


This stuff is deee-licious.

Dadgum Roi
12-23-2009, 07:50 AM
Moonshine was available at three weddings I attended in quick succession. It was supposed to be at mine too, but apparently my friend's source was dry.

We used to always get some around the holidays. There was a group of hunters that would come down from the mountains to hunt on our farm, and they'd pay us in homemade hams and moonshine. I miss that a lot.

Ethan
12-23-2009, 08:03 AM
What does moonshine actually refer to? I always thought it was just a slang term for liquor that's made in a bathtub and makes you go blind.

Dadgum Roi
12-23-2009, 08:06 AM
What does moonshine actually refer to? I always thought it was just a slang term for liquor that's made in a bathtub and makes you go blind.

It's an unaged corn whiskey.

benjibot
12-23-2009, 08:09 AM
It's made of corn. The taste can vary wildly between batches and creator, but it's usually pretty damned potent. Typically it's made out in the country away from police attention. It's made the same way as other liquors in a still but as far as I know it isn't aged at all.

It's why them Duke boys needed that fancy car. Also NASCAR was born out of its production and distribution.

ajr82
12-23-2009, 08:20 AM
I drink a lot of rye whiskey, since there is so much if it around here to choose from. A lot of people like crown royal, but I couldn't really care much for it. I'd probably prefer forty creek or wisers whiskey more.

Can't say I've tried that much scotch, just some cheaper brands that I can't remember the name of. Same with bourbon.

I also wish that the maple syrup and whiskey blends were sold outside of Quebec. That stuff is delicious :(

Fun fact: Canadian whiskey does not have any requirements for what's used to make it other than that it must "possess the aroma, taste and character generally attributed to Canadian whisky". Canadians call almost all this stuff "rye", even though there's almost always less than 10% rye grain in the mash.

Except for Alberta Springs and Alberta Premium, which use 100% rye and only cost about $20. They're both pretty good: sweeter and a lot bolder than stuff like CC.

Knight
12-23-2009, 08:21 AM
I don't get a chance to drink very often, but I usually drink Wild Turkey for bourbon, and Powers for whiskey.
I'd love to drink Macallan or Blue Label or some other expensive crap all the time, but I can't always afford that, you know? Jameson's is pretty good too and in the same price range.
Oh my god, one of my old roommates drank Macallan all the fucking time. He let me try a sip once, and it was really damn tasty, but like $25-$50 a glass (depending on the age) was just ridiculous.

StriderDL
12-23-2009, 08:22 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/Spencish/jameson-whiskey.jpg


This stuff is deee-licious.

I actually find Jameson to be harsher than Bushmills or Powers.

benjibot
12-23-2009, 08:45 AM
Another fun fact: The oak barrels used to age bourbon are used once and then exported to be reused to age scotch.

NevznachaY
12-23-2009, 08:46 AM
I am (well, was) a bartender under the age of 40 and I know how to make one.

I'd love to read about this experience. Why did you quit?

Ethan
12-23-2009, 08:48 AM
Benjibot and I probably need to stage a Chicago-based TT meetup and spirit tasting event.

benjibot
12-23-2009, 08:51 AM
Benjibot and I probably need to stage a Chicago-based TT meetup and spirit tasting event.

Hell yeah. I'll bring the Malört (http://www.avclub.com/articles/taste-test-jeppsons-malort,2529/).

Ethan
12-23-2009, 09:17 AM
I was just drinking Malört last night.

The key with Malört is the power of suggestion. Most people think it tastes like fermented earwax juice, until you suggest to them that it tastes like grapefruit zest, which transforms it into one of the tastiest drinks there is – an explosion of grapefruit freshness.

Posaune
12-23-2009, 09:22 AM
Hell yeah. I'll bring the Malört (http://www.avclub.com/articles/taste-test-jeppsons-malort,2529/).

I got a bottle last time I was in Chicago and finally tried it a few weeks ago.

Also, the key is to present it as a feat of strength. "Why isn't the aftertaste going away!?"

benjibot
12-23-2009, 09:32 AM
I haven't actually tried it yet. I bought a bottle as a gift but that was mailed off to my friend a few days ago. I shall buy some next time I'm at Binny's.

First though, I need some apple cider and some rum. Because that's what the holidays are all about.

Reinforcements
12-23-2009, 09:41 AM
I like me a good single-malt scotch, though I don't get it that often. Now that I think of it, though, now that it's winter I need to make some hot toddies one of these days.

Anyway.

I don't care for bourbon, though speaking of winter drinks it is my preferred additive to eggnog. Rye whisky is rare around here, so I've never had it except mixed into the Cape Fear Punch I made for this year's Halloween party. Brandy I can't speak to because I've never had good brandy, and the vast majority of all the brandy I've ever bought has been sprayed onto fruitcake.

My most usual cocktail is a gin and tonic, because gin is great. Rum and diet is my second go-to cheap cocktail for happy hours, if I want something sweeter. Rum, especially good dark rum, is delicious but if I was ordering something neat or on the rocks it would be scotch.

Ethan
12-23-2009, 09:43 AM
Another classic Chicago favorite: Żubrówka and unfiltered apple juice. Tastes uncannily like apple pie.

Adrenaline
12-23-2009, 09:45 AM
The only whiskey I've ever drank was a swig of some fairly cheap stuff from a bottle. Puts hair on your chest!

nadia
12-23-2009, 10:06 AM
I've always wanted to try moonshine, but for all the times I've been down in NC, nobody's offered it! Come on southern US, you're slacking on your stereotype responsibilities!

I'd especially love to try it because the low alcohol content in most American beers makes me feel like I'm chasing a dangling carrot. I drink and drink and get nowhere. Eventually it dawns on me that I'm consuming a lot of calories for nothing, and I give up.

Most potent stuff I drank was home made Itallian wine. I'm pretty good at holding my liquor, but I was at a company party with a lot of old Itallian guys in attendance, and they had a friendly competition going on. I seriously had no idea the stuff would be so strong. I don't think I've ever been so wasted.

Actually, most of the staff was wasted, and we had to work directly after the party. Oh boy. One woman asked me for directions to The Gap; I think I sent her to the moon.

Stiv
12-23-2009, 10:09 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/Spencish/jameson-whiskey.jpg

This is grade-school, entry-level whiskey. There's nothing wrong with it, but it's definitely an average kinda drink, especially for the price. I can't recommend a good Irish to you, because I hate Irish whiskey, but try out a couple of mid-end scotches and see what you think. Laphroaig isn't everybody's bag but it's usually fairly cheap.

Irish drinkers, help this man out!

Ethan
12-23-2009, 10:18 AM
The only reason to want Irish whiskey is lack of experience with Scotch.

For someone coming over from Irish to Scotch, I would probably recommend a lighter, more approachable style than Laphroaig. Balvenie would be a good starting point, and is quite inexpensive as far as single malts go.

Gwrrrk
12-23-2009, 11:42 AM
Checking for prices at the local Taxes R' Us (http://www.lcbo.ca). I wish I could afford spending money on this good stuff.

Not that I don't appreciate the recommendations, though! Thanks!

Phantoon
12-23-2009, 01:51 PM
If you want whiskey, then Bushmills (www.bushmills.com) is rather pleasant.

If you're going for whisky and want to challenge yourself then Ardbeg (http://www.ardbeg.com/members/public/index/checkage) or Talisker (www.taliskerwhisky.com) are amazing. They're very peaty, but once you "get" them you'll probably never go back.

Blended wise J and B (http://www.startapartyhere.com/) is good, but blends are almost never as good as a proper single malt. If anyone tries to give you Bells however then slap them in their ignorant face. I wouldn't use that shit as a toilet cleaner, let alone drink it.

Paul le Fou
12-23-2009, 03:45 PM
Brandy is the opposite! Nothing should be allowed to dilute it.

Egg nog.

EGG NOG.

I'd love to read about this experience. Why did you quit?

Got a real job. :P


As for whiskey, you can like Irish and Scotch for different things. Scotch I like for events, like having a glass with family or friends or something, and Irish is better for drinkin'. And the flavors are distinct enough that you don't have to feel ashamed or uncultured if you simply like one or the other, or perhaps both.

teekun
12-23-2009, 04:01 PM
This is grade-school, entry-level whiskey. There's nothing wrong with it, but it's definitely an average kinda drink, especially for the price. I can't recommend a good Irish to you, because I hate Irish whiskey, but try out a couple of mid-end scotches and see what you think. Laphroaig isn't everybody's bag but it's usually fairly cheap.

Irish drinkers, help this man out!

He should be drinking a 12 Year Tullamore Dew.

That is all.

Pombar
12-23-2009, 04:18 PM
Egg nog.

EGG NOG.I'll not object too strongly, since I've never tried it, but from what I know, it's basically puke, right? Puke in texture and taste? This does not sound a worthy substance to mix with Brandy.

Adrenaline
12-23-2009, 06:40 PM
Purity Egg Nog, unlike other Egg Nog, is not only drinkable, but totally awesome. Haven't mixed it with alcohol, though. Seems like an expensive, easily failed experiment.

ArugulaZ
12-23-2009, 07:18 PM
DON'T DISS THE NOG, MAN! It's not like puke... good egg nog is smooth and creamy, with just a touch of nutmeg as a garnish. If yours is extra chunky, it's time to throw it out and buy a new pint.

Patrick
12-23-2009, 07:47 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/Spencish/jameson-whiskey.jpg


This stuff is deee-licious.

That's what I usually order, but only because I don't drink much hard stuff. I do spend a lot of money on good beer, though.

Another fun fact: The oak barrels used to age bourbon are used once and then exported to be reused to age scotch.

Also, whiskky and wine barrels are often used to age beer. A few months ago I went to a barrel aged-beer festival, and they had some really interesting flavors.

Benjibot and I probably need to stage a Chicago-based TT meetup and spirit tasting event.

I'm in!

Hell yeah. I'll bring the Malört (http://www.avclub.com/articles/taste-test-jeppsons-malort,2529/).

Nevermind! Seriously, Malort is awful. A "friend" gave me some as a "gift" once.

I would be up for a meetup if you guys are interested in educating me in the ways of hard liquor. I'm semi-knowledgeable about wines and I know a ton about beers, so it would be nice to add Whisky to my drinking toolbox.

Matchstick
12-23-2009, 08:14 PM
I actually find Jameson to be harsher than Bushmills or Powers.

Protestant.

keele864
12-23-2009, 09:55 PM
I don't really drink, but when we were in Ireland, we stopped at the Bushmills Distillery and took a tour. As part of it, we got to sample some things and we ended up bringing home a bottle of original stuff. I can't say that I like it, but I've knocked back a couple on various special occasions. *shudders*

I never did get around to the Bushmills tour. And I lived in Dublin for a year. On the other hand, I located the best street in Dublin. It has pubs, of course, but also 1) three good bookstores, 2) a good lunch place, and 3) a store devoted entirely to whiskey (http://www.celticwhiskeyshop.com/).

I like Jameson a lot, though I haven't sampled whiskey as widely as I would have liked. I don't spend much money on alcohol and most of my friends aren't the type to enjoy whiskey at all.

I've heard very good things about the slightly-more-expensive-than-regular Jameson Redbreast brand. I haven't had any since 2007 and I didn't have any normal Jameson to compare it to, but quite a few People of Taste seem to think it much better than the basic Jameson.

Alixsar
12-24-2009, 12:20 AM
So this is something I've known for a long time but tonight just confirmed it: I fucking hate bars. WHAT DO YOU MEAN YOU DON'T HAVE WHISKEY THIS IS A FUCKING BAR And no Jack Daniels doesn't count. The sad thing is that this is just the beginning of how much I hate bars, and I am so angry right now I want to murder someone. Having some whore spill her drink on me and then have her douchebag boyfriend threaten me is not how alcohol is meant to be enjoyed.

I don't know why I let my friend drag me into that God forsaken hell hole. The patrons all had that stare; the one that went past the horizon. You could look at them, and see them, and know that there was truly nothing there. They are merely shells, empty vessels careening hopelessly towards oblivion.

And loudly singing along with shitty hip-hop.

StriderDL
12-24-2009, 03:58 AM
Protestant.

I thought Powers was a whiskey of the South. You know, catlick.

Gwrrrk
12-24-2009, 06:08 AM
Anyone here ever try any Japanese whiskeys?

StriderDL
12-24-2009, 06:49 AM
I had snake whiskey from Laos. It tasted of soy sauce. Unpleasant.

Paul le Fou
12-24-2009, 07:01 AM
Yeah, I've had a Japanese whiskey or two. I don't like them very much. They're kind of light and the flavor... my liquor vocabulary fails me, but the flavor is a little flatter and plainer than, say, scotch, bourbon, or Irish. It reminds me a little of Canadian whiskey (which I also don't like).

Ethan
12-24-2009, 07:17 AM
I've never had Japanese whiskey, but it has the reputation for having more of a pure malt taste, without a lot of the wood or peat influence of Scotch or bourbon.

Matchstick
12-24-2009, 11:30 AM
I thought Powers was a whiskey of the South. You know, catlick.

I don't know about Powers. I was channelling Jimmy McNulty.

Calorie Mate
12-24-2009, 01:59 PM
I enjoy a whiskey. Unfortunately, I only started drinking a few years ago (I'm a late bloomer) and all of what's probably considered the "good" stuff is expensive and I'm reluctant to take a chance on it. My grandpa had a couple Canadian whiskies that had a smoother taste but weren't as strong, which was neat, but otherwise I just sort of drink whatever. I should probably take notes in this thread.

Also, whiskey and coke (specifically, Diet Coke) is my favorite mixed drink, too. Something about the whiskey taste mixed with the coke's taste does it for me.

So this is something I've known for a long time but tonight just confirmed it: I fucking hate bars. WHAT DO YOU MEAN YOU DON'T HAVE WHISKEY THIS IS A FUCKING BAR And no Jack Daniels doesn't count. The sad thing is that this is just the beginning of how much I hate bars, and I am so angry right now I want to murder someone. Having some whore spill her drink on me and then have her douchebag boyfriend threaten me is not how alcohol is meant to be enjoyed.

I don't know why I let my friend drag me into that God forsaken hell hole. The patrons all had that stare; the one that went past the horizon. You could look at them, and see them, and know that there was truly nothing there. They are merely shells, empty vessels careening hopelessly towards oblivion.

And loudly singing along with shitty hip-hop.

You and I should drink more. Low key bars are fun once in a great while, but basically you're totally right.

Stiv
12-24-2009, 07:03 PM
If you're going for whisky and want to challenge yourself then Ardbeg (http://www.ardbeg.com/members/public/index/checkage) or Talisker (www.taliskerwhisky.com) are amazing. They're very peaty, but once you "get" them you'll probably never go back.

I've always found to be Talisker on the milder, sweeter side of scotches, but you're right - it's an excellent entry-level scotch for when you've got some tens of dollars to blow on a bottle.

As for the bar experience? Find a bar that serves rye. Seriously - rye whiskey is delicious, and I'd recommend any bourbon aficionado try it at least once in their life. Bars with rye are also usually the low-key, Pro Drunk bars, which means mostly Led Zeppelin and not terrible people in backwards baseball caps calling each other "bro" and saying that the last game of foosball they played was "tight".

Failing that, find a pub that has a wide selection of scotches - in my town there are actually two (but they're both overpriced)!

dangerhelvetica
12-24-2009, 07:53 PM
Anyone here ever try any Japanese whiskeys?

I know one guy that has.

http://www.nerve.com/CS/blogs/screengrab/2008/05/01-07/suntory.jpg

Alixsar
12-25-2009, 01:00 AM
Also, whiskey and coke (specifically, Diet Coke) is my favorite mixed drink, too. Something about the whiskey taste mixed with the coke's taste does it for me.

You and I should drink more. Low key bars are fun once in a great while, but basically you're totally right.

Given that whiskey and some kind of soda is my favorite mixed drink (I'm partial to Seagrams [since it's cheap but still almost good] and 7UP but I've experimented with many a whiskey and soda combination), yeah definitely. You've got my number, bro.

Also, remember that guy I mentioned who returned the whiskey in my first post? Yeah, so I ended up buying it since it was "faulty" and I figured what the hell, why not? It was a bottle of Buchanan's Scotch Whiskey (http://www.carmelsfinest.com/index.cfm/Buchanans_Scotch_12_Yr_102.htm). It's a 30-some-odd dollar bottle that I got for 10 (since it was "damaged" when I took it back). The guy returning it was right; the pourer is seriously fucked up. But if you shake the bottle a bit as you pour, then it's perfectly okay. And it's not half bad! The best I've ever had? No, certainly not...but I like it all the same. I wish I had a flask so I could just fill this thing up and go to town.

Paul le Fou
12-25-2009, 01:36 AM
Seagram's 7 is great for mixing. I wouldn't touch it straight, but if you have a coke onhand...

reibeatall
12-25-2009, 11:01 AM
My experience with whiskey is as follows:
Jack Daniels
Maker's Mark


Now, this is not necessarily right for this topic title, but this is a fantastic goddamn drink

http://www.corkonthefork.com/Pictures/rumple.jpg

Sven
12-25-2009, 12:16 PM
As a person of subcontinental extraction, it is in my genetics to be a fan of Johnnie Walker Black Label

I like it with a half-shot of soda to cut it a bit.

Alixsar
12-25-2009, 02:03 PM
Seagram's 7 is great for mixing. I wouldn't touch it straight, but if you have a coke onhand...

Yeah exactly. I wouldn't dare touch it straight, but if I have 7UP handy? Fuggedabout it.

keele864
12-25-2009, 06:49 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/Spencish/jameson-whiskey.jpg


This stuff is deee-licious.

I got a bottle for Christmas!

MCBanjoMike
12-25-2009, 08:59 PM
I personally can't stand whik(e)y, but a lot of my friends are really into the single malts. My girlfriend went a little crazy and bought a friend of ours a $100 bottle of Lagavulin 16-year for Christmas (and to thank him for finding her an apartment in Quebec City). It feels classy just giving the stuff away, although it would be totally wasted on me.

Calorie Mate
12-25-2009, 09:13 PM
So now I'm more interested. I think I need to, you know, make drinking whiskey a serious thing, so: where to start? How does one find something they like without breaking the bank, and learn what they personally don't like?

Phantoon
12-26-2009, 04:08 AM
So now I'm more interested. I think I need to, you know, make drinking whiskey a serious thing, so: where to start? How does one find something they like without breaking the bank, and learn what they personally don't like?

I'd try to find a bar with a good selection and go there with some friends. Make a night of it. Whatever you do, don't go out and buy an expensive single malt on someone's recommendation until you know that you like the taste. If it's a decent bar they may be able to recommend stuff to try.

I'd personally steer clear of blends other than J and B as they're usually cheap dregs. Whisk(e)y shouldn't attack the back of your throat - that's a sign that the drink is nasty if it does. Generally the good stuff has a kick but is pretty smooth. Also try not to write off any whisky on first taste - I hated Ardbeg on my first sip and now it's easily my favourite.

Ethan
12-26-2009, 08:14 AM
I actually don't think it's bad to buy first. In Scotch terms, it could be smart to buy yourself one good low-end single malt Scotch – a bottle that costs around $30 and is very common, such as Glenlivet 12 – so you can familiarize yourself with some kind of baseline level of quality beyond the mass market blended stuff, decide what elements of the flavor you like or don't like, and give yourself a point of reference for when you try other stuff at bars. Common single malts like Glenlivet and Glenfiddich have pretty reserved and balanced flavors because they're supposed to have a very wide appeal, so you could set yourself up for a mind-splitting-open moment if you "got used to" one of those basic drinks, and then bought yourself a glass of Laphroaig or Talisker.

I'm sure the same is true of Bourbon, but I don't know where the starting point would be. Knob Creek? Bulleit?

I agree with Phantoon that doing this with friends is best. Half the fun of fancy whisky, or maybe more than half, is talking about it.

Alixsar
12-26-2009, 03:11 PM
I'm sure the same is true of Bourbon, but I don't know where the starting point would be. Knob Creek? Bulleit?

Bulleit Bourbon is pretty great, so I'd recommend that.

Calorie Mate
12-26-2009, 03:17 PM
I agree with Phantoon that doing this with friends is best. Half the fun of fancy whisky, or maybe more than half, is talking about it.

My only problem is that the only good friend I have that liked whiskey stopped drinking period years ago. Hm.

Alixsar
12-26-2009, 03:22 PM
My only problem is that the only good friend I have that liked whiskey stopped drinking period years ago. Hm.

You and I should drink more.

You've got my number, bro.

Just sayin', is all.

benjibot
12-26-2009, 03:56 PM
I wish I had a flask so I could just fill this thing up and go to town.

Speak of the devil. This was in my stocking:

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4012/4216686463_bcdb6e732a.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/benjibot/4216686463/)

I need to make certain I have something manly enough to fill it with.

Calorie Mate
12-27-2009, 07:17 PM
Just sayin', is all.

Oh, this is happening.

Sven
12-27-2009, 08:12 PM
So now I'm more interested. I think I need to, you know, make drinking whiskey a serious thing, so: where to start? How does one find something they like without breaking the bank, and learn what they personally don't like?

Check out restaurants, especially steakhouses, in your area - odds are they do whiskey tastings a couple times a year.

Hy's in Toronto is famous for theirs, although it costs a pretty penny to get in. My only visit was when I got comped.

Odin
12-27-2009, 08:43 PM
I am a twentysomething with twentysomething wages, so blended is all I can afford except on very special occasions. I would like to become cultured, but budgetary concerns keep me on the $20-$25/750mL shelf.

That said Crown (Royal) and Coke is damn tasty, as is Buffalo Trace (alone or with Coke). Once you find one that you like you can usually get the 1.75L for less than 2 750mL bottles if you're budget conscious but can't stand drinking cheap shit. It's like free booze! Jameson is good stuff. Bulleit is a good bourbon, but since my bourbon drinking started with Wild Turkey and moved to Bulleit, my opinion carries little weight.

The basic Glenlivet 12 year is delicious and what I get when I have a little more to spend. A few years ago I went in with my brother-in-law and we got a Glenlivet 12 year French Oak and it was an experience. You could almost pick the splinters from between your teeth on the oak taste, and we liked it that way.

taidan
12-28-2009, 06:54 AM
Most of the posters in this thread have read my mind. Just wanted to add that Red Stag (http://www.theredstag.com/) is rather tasty.

Red Hedgehog
12-29-2009, 09:40 PM
I agree with Phantoon that doing this with friends is best. Half the fun of fancy whisky, or maybe more than half, is talking about it.

Yes. I know nothing of Scotch (or Whisky), but I love drinking it with friends.

Red Hedgehog
02-15-2011, 09:35 PM
I couldn't decide which of the half dozen alcohol-related threads to post this in, but figured this one had a nice symmetry since I drank scotch and had the last post in this thread.

After a long work day, I stopped in the local bar for one of the best burgers in town (and a Pork Slap beer to wash it down) and then followed it with a relaxing Macallan on the rocks. Paradise.

Kirin
02-16-2011, 09:06 AM
So, now that this has been revived, it should probably be moved to the food forum, yeah?

Ethan
02-27-2011, 07:08 AM
Since both booze threads are in hibernation, I guess I'll give this one the push-off to be the one true whisky thread of this new two-booze-thread world.

I picked up a bottle of Laphroaig 10 from the Singapore duty-free shop this morning. This is cause for minor celebration because Laphroaig (and heavily peated Scotch in general) is nearly impossible to find in Vietnam, and also because I got a full liter for 45 bones, whereas a 750mL bottle would have cost me about 50 after tax in the States.

Anyone in this thread who hasn't ever had a Laphroaig 10 neat should rectify that as soon as possible. It's the quintessential first step beyond the "Glens", and I dare say one of the quintessential works of mankind.

fugu13
02-27-2011, 12:40 PM
Yeah, I'm a fan of Laphroaig's offerings. Quarter Cask might be my favorite whisky.

I'm a bit strange: I prefer both the peatiest whisky and some very sweet whisky (though never without nuance).

Ethan
02-27-2011, 06:33 PM
Quarter Cask was actually the first Laphroaig I ever tried, and it was also a duty-free purchase, from the Seoul airport 2 years ago. Amazing Scotch. I think I actually liked it more than the 18-year single-cask Laphroaig specialty bottling I had.

Kirin
02-28-2011, 09:29 AM
...and some very sweet whisky.

So, which ones are these? Since I frequently enjoy drinks that other drinkers say are way too sweet, I feel like I should probably try them.

foxflyer5
02-28-2011, 12:27 PM
Anyone here ever try any Japanese whiskeys?

i have the Yamazaki single malt at home. its pretty good.

but really im a bourbon man. the Willett Pot Still and Rock Hill Farms are probably my favorites. of course the Pappy Van Winkle line is excellent, they are pricey so i try to only have those with guests. Fighting Cock and Old Grandad BiB are good every day bourbons. ill also get into some ryes as well.

fugu13
02-28-2011, 12:47 PM
Coincidentally, the Yamazaki 12 is an excellent example of a sweet whisky. I think there are some other really nice japanese ones, but I haven't had a chance to try them yet :( .

B&B (Bourbon and Benedictine; technically a cocktail, but it suffers not at all from being premixed) is a great sweet drink with a whisky base. I drink it with ice, while I always drink my scotch-style whisky with a splash of water in the glass and a glass of cold water on the side. I find varying how recently I've had the cold water can really let me explore all the different flavors of the whisky. For instance, if you have some of the Bunnahabhain right after cold water, and roll it around on top of your tongue, it tastes of butterscotch. Actually, the Bunnahabhain is pretty sweet, despite being an Islay scotch. I hear the 25 is especially sweet, though I've never had it. *tries to remember others he's tried*

Oh! Caol Ila, which is really good, and one of the more unique scotches I've tasted. And of course, the Glenlivet and Glenmorangie are sweet, and they're pretty widely available. The Lagavulin is a sort of odd compromise between sweet and not sweet.

And if you want to try something that's pretty peaty without the intensity of the Laphroaig, I can recommend Bowmore Darkest.

MCBanjoMike
03-02-2011, 09:45 AM
I saw a friend of mine on Saturday, and we toasted my impending dadness with some Glenrothes at his place. I'm still new to this whole whisky business, but this stuff was quite pleasing and didn't feel like battery acid going down. It also comes in this nifty bottle:

http://s6.thisnext.com/media/largest_dimension/2E8A79D0.jpg

I'm not actually sure how old the bottle we drank from was, but he said it was around $100 or so. Good thing I exercise extreme moderation when drinking fine whisky!

foxflyer5
03-07-2011, 12:42 PM
currently drink the Old Forrester. nice little bourbon with just the right about of bite.

SDMX
03-07-2011, 12:51 PM
You and I should drink more. Low key bars are fun once in a great while, but basically you're totally right.

I don't think any of us smoke, but Cigar Bar in SF is about the best place I've ever had a drink that doesn't have a dress code.

Addendum: For Bourbon drinkers, what the fuck is wrong with Bookers, seriously? 5 minutes of burn is not synonymous with 'lost-lasting flavor'. 60 buck a bottle, you people should die horribly.

Olli T
03-07-2011, 11:43 PM
http://static02.mediaite.com/geekosystem/uploads/2010/03/HE-MAN-XXX-Whisky2.jpg (http://www.geekosystem.com/he-man-whiskey-gin-rum/)
that is all.

ajr82
03-09-2011, 08:37 AM
My nearby liquor store actually had the Forty Creek Confederation Oak Reserve ($70 per bottle, limited edition) as one of their free samples a few weeks ago. I tried it, and it is the smoothest Canadian whiskey I have ever tried.

http://www.fortycreekwhisky.com/images/40Crk_ConfedOak_RGB.jpg

It's called Confederation Oak because it's aged in barrels made from oak trees near the distillery that were planted around the time of Canadian Confederation in 1867.

ajr82
03-21-2011, 09:35 PM
So I'm planning on finally picking up a good bottle of single malt scotch, and I'm hoping I can get a good recommendation. I don't have much scotch experience, but I'm a fan of actual rye whiskey, Maker's Mark and some of the sharper Canadian whiskys.

Ethan
03-22-2011, 12:33 AM
Get a bottle of Talisker 10 if you can afford a $50-60 bottle. It's a spectacular Scotch that has a big spiciness that you'll appreciate if you're coming over from rye and bourbon. It's got a nice peat/smoke presence, so you'll definitely know it's Scotch, but it's not so far toward that flavor extreme as to gross out newcomers.

If it has to be priced closer to entry-level, get Highland Park 12.

ajr82
03-22-2011, 07:40 AM
Get a bottle of Talisker 10 if you can afford a $50-60 bottle. It's a spectacular Scotch that has a big spiciness that you'll appreciate if you're coming over from rye and bourbon. It's got a nice peat/smoke presence, so you'll definitely know it's Scotch, but it's not so far toward that flavor extreme as to gross out newcomers.

If it has to be priced closer to entry-level, get Highland Park 12.

The Talisker is $75 per bottle here, while the Highland Park 12 is $60. If I'm spending that much, I think I can afford the extra 15.

Ethan
03-22-2011, 08:16 AM
Yeah, but those are in Canadian dollars, so the US equivalent is, like...

Oh.

Oh dear me.

ajr82
03-22-2011, 09:07 AM
You can only get liquor at government liquor stores in Manitoba, so the prices tend to be pretty high as a form of vice tax.

Ethan
03-22-2011, 09:39 AM
Out of curiosity, how much is Glenlivet 12 there?

Nodal
03-22-2011, 09:41 AM
You can only get liquor at government liquor stores in Manitoba, so the prices tend to be pretty high as a form of vice tax.

Good god!

ajr82
03-22-2011, 11:06 AM
Out of curiosity, how much is Glenlivet 12 there?

$42 for 750 mL, or $60 for 1.14L.

Also, all these prices are also subject to 12% sales tax.

Sir Sly Ry
03-25-2011, 08:38 PM
$42 for 750 mL
Sounds about right. Maybe even cheaper than I can get it here in good ol' Pennsylvania. But that 12% sales tax is brutal. Ouch.
Wait. Are those 42 Canadian dollars? Nevermind. Double ouch. Just buy something cheap. Seriously, (good) scotch is cool, but it's really not worth it. At least in the U.S., I can get a cheap ass bourbon for the fraction of the cost, and it is often better.
By the way, Glenlivet 12 is better than the 15.

Figure Four
03-25-2011, 09:26 PM
Laphrohaig 10 is damn good and on the cheap side as far as single malts go. You should be forewarned thought that Laphrohaig is hugely peaty with an intense smoke. I think that's a good thing but not everyone agrees.

Ethan
03-26-2011, 04:19 AM
Laphroaig is great but I'm not always in the mood for it. It's a perfect choice for a liquor cabinet with 2 or 3 single malts in it, but I have a hard time recommending it to someone who's just getting into Scotch and looking to buy one bottle.

Good Scotch is totally worth it if your goal is trying nice Scotch, as opposed to nice booze in general. Yes, you'll get a rarer and more prized malt for your dollar if you stick with the stuff that's made in your own country, but that only matters if you like all the various whisky types equally. Few do.

Heron
04-09-2011, 02:56 PM
I've been interested in scotch and whiskey for sometime. It's a bit more difficult to get into than beer I find since I'm not sure what I'm looking for. I don't know what the difference between the two, and what exactly single malt means et cetera. Also, most of it tastes like burning to me. I have been drinking Lismore single malt just to try it but it isn't doing that much for me. I did try some Glenlivet 12 though and could taste a difference, which I think that I liked. Also, I do like Drambuie.

So, any advice on what to try, or what to look for in taste and such? Also, is it preferable to have it in a tumbler alone or have it on the rocks?

fugu13
04-09-2011, 03:09 PM
Generally you drink single malt whisky without ice, though putting a splash (I usually go with one or two large drops if I do) of water is common, and can open up the flavor profile.

Re: burning, make sure you aren't drinking too much or swallowing too quickly. Fine whisky is meant to be sipped in small quantities and rolled around on and under the tongue. There'll still be plenty of burning, but you'll get exposed to a wealth of additional flavors.

Ethan
04-11-2011, 07:24 AM
II'm not sure what I'm looking for. I don't know what the difference between the two, and what exactly single malt means et cetera.

Whisky (or whiskey, if you're referring to North American or Irish drinks) is the general term to refer to spirits that are made from grains and aged in wood. The process is similar for almost all whiskies: malt the grains (soak them until they begin to germinate, which converts their starches into sugars), dry them, ferment them, distill the results, and put it into wooden casks for a number of years. The different names for various whiskies refer to the particulars of the process, which vary by region.

Scotch whisky malt is dried over burning peat, which imparts a flavor. It's distilled twice and aged for a really long time (longer than other whiskies) in second-use wooden barrels that previously stored something like bourbon or sherry. It has to be made in Scotland to be Scotch, but there are drinks from other parts of the world that are basically Scotch in every sense but the name, such as Suntory Yamazaki of Japan and Amrut Fusion of India. It usually has a pretty assertive flavor and a complex aroma, though the exact flavors and aromas vary wildly based on which distillery made it, and in which area of Scotland.

Irish whiskey is made from barley that has only partially malted, meaning it hasn't sprouted yet. Distillation is done three times in a special copper pot still. The casks are second-use as in Scotch. It has to be made in Ireland. It's lighter and simpler than Scotch.

Bourbon is made in the USA (usually Kentucky) out of a malted grain blend that is mostly corn. It must be aged in first-use charred American oak barrels. It's got an aggressive, hot flavor and is often bottled at a higher concentration than Scotch whisky or Irish whiskey.

Rye whiskey is like bourbon, but the grain mixture is mostly Rye.

Canadian whiskey is somewhat similar to bourbon, but it has to be made in Canada, all kinds of casks can be used, and it sometimes has added flavors.

"Single malt" means it's the work of one individual distillery. "Vatted malt" (or "pure malt") means it's made from the products of more than one distillery, but it's still 100% malt whisky with no other liquor added. "Blended" means it's a vatted malt with neutral grain alcohol added, and possibly some other crap as well. These terms go for all types of whisky, though it tends to be Scotland that produces single malt whiskies.

If you've got a little bit of money to burn, one great way to get into whisky is to buy one entry-level Scotch (a cheaper single malt like Glenlivet 12, or maybe Johnnie Waker Black if you don't want to dive straight into single malts) and one mid-range American whisky (such as Bulleit or Old Weller) and see which one you want to explore further. Then, when you've chosen a path, branch out and try two very different whiskies within that path, such as Highland Park and Laphroaig (Scotches), or Pappy Van Winkle and WhistlePig (American whiskeys). From there you'll naturally find your favorite style, like Kentucky straight bourbon, or Islay single malt, or whatever.

Don't bother with Irish whiskey (Bushmill's, Tullamore Dew, etc.). It's boring.

Also, note that if you live in the States, Scotch will be a much more expensive hobby than American whiskey because it has to be imported. That said, I'm American and I'm definitely a Scotch guy. I find Scotch to be more complex and, well, more sensuous than bourbon. That said, I have tasted one or two high-end bourbons that were amazing.

Oh, and one more note: if the burning sensation is too strong, don't fight against it by taking tiny nips or adding ice. The best thing to do is nose the whisky first — breathe in the aroma. The first smell will have a strong ethanol sting, but that will go away with subsequent smells, and big flavors will be revealed. Then it's time to take a drink, and you should make sure it's a big enough sip so that you can taste it with all areas of the mouth. Keep it in your mouth for several seconds, roll it around before you drink it, and then breathe slow and deep, and let it surge through your sinuses. Embrace the burn, and it will embrace you.

Writing this got me excited, so I've poured myself some Laphroaig 10.

Heron
04-11-2011, 11:40 AM
Thanks for the advice! I have some Glenlivet 12 here and I did enjoy it. I'll try what you and Fugu have said and see how it goes. I have also tried Jameson once before, on a recommendation, and it was alright. I see Laphroaig mentioned here and I think I'll get a bottle of that since the Glenlivet 12 has interested me. Although I'll keep an eye out for Bulleit and Old Weller. I'd love to hear more recommendations.

As for the burning, it was a bit of a joke. It just happens when it goes down and I get a bit of a hit, which I'm not quite used to yet. I have tried rolling the whisky before and to breathe during that, sort of like wine tasting. Now that I know how important that is, I'll do that. I'm hoping that I'll develop a palate for whisky.

Now I'm excited about this.

Ethan
04-11-2011, 11:57 AM
Beware: Laphroaig is a very peaty Scotch, quite far from Glenlivet on the flavor spectrum. I love it, and it is indeed one of the most classic malts there is, but it's not for everyone. Buy a glass of it in a bar before you pick up a bottle.

And if you like it, try Lagavulin 16 next.

ajr82
04-16-2011, 01:44 PM
In terms of Canadian whisky, it's mostly made with corn, even though it's generically referred to as "rye" in Canada. Whiskies sold in Canada have to be aged for a minimum of three years.

There's also essentially no such thing as a single-malt Canadian whisky. Even the best ones are blended. The only single malt is Glen Breton, which is made in the Scottish style.

A lot of whiskey snobs have a very poor impression of Canadian whisky, partially because they tend to be smoother and less robust than scotch or bourbon, and partially because the best Canadian whiskys are only widely available in Canada.

The best Canadian whiskies I've had are made by Forty Creek (http://www.fortycreekwhisky.com/home.html). Their Barrel Select is my whisky of choice for everyday consumption or mixing, and their Confederation Oak Reserve is even better, and is my "special bottle".

Also good is Alberta Distillers, out of Calgary, who are well known for making the only pure rye whisky in Canada (and are apparently owned by Jim Beam now). Their Alberta Springs is fiery and very sharp, while their 10 year Alberta Premium hits a lot of the same notes with a lot more smoothness.

The basic Canadian Club is only really worth mixing, but they make a lot of other varieties that are well worth trying.

ajr82
10-21-2011, 06:45 PM
So Alberta Premium, which I referred to in my post above, has now released a 30 year old whisky (http://www.canadianwhisky.org/reviews/alberta-premium-30-year-old-limited-edition%C2%AE-40-alc-vol.html) for the absurdly low price of $50.

It's really fucking good.

fugu13
10-22-2011, 03:10 AM
Ouch, not going to come to the US. I want some.

Ethan
10-27-2011, 09:45 AM
30 years, eh? I'm not that far from British Columbia...

ajr82
11-29-2011, 08:11 PM
I'd like to have a blended scotch on hand for cocktails, or for people who prefer their whisky a little milder. Any suggestions?

ajr82
02-10-2012, 04:10 PM
Wiser's Small batch is a nice Canadian whisky, but it's not as good as Forty Creek. The Forty Creek Barrel Reserve has an earthiness that the Wiser's doesn't match, even though it has a much heavier mouthfeel.

I don't care if it doesn't get much respect or if it's just "brown vodka", I'm both nationalistic and a fan of Canadian whisky.

ajr82
02-10-2012, 07:15 PM
Also, once you've had a couple drinks, Talisker 10 year kind of tastes like bacon. Nothing but smoke.

Dawnswalker
02-10-2012, 07:25 PM
Well, Wiser's isn't very complex, but it's a good whisky for its price point, and you don't have to feel like you're committing a sin if you use it as a mixer.

ajr82
02-10-2012, 07:31 PM
Well, Wiser's isn't very complex, but it's a good whisky for its price point, and you don't have to feel like you're committing a sin if you use it as a mixer.

Normal Wiser's, sure, but the Small Batch is actually a nice whisky for the price.

(For a Canadian, as much as I hate that caveat).

Paul le Fou
03-05-2012, 10:17 PM
I had some friends raving about Suntory's Yamazaki, so I went and picked up a bottle of Yamazaki 10, and it's pretty good! Sweet and smooth, and not too expensive either. I normally don't drink a lot of whiskey and can't claim a refined palate for it, but it's always good to have a bottle of good stuff around just in case. You know, in case my grandparents come to visit...?

Kirin
03-06-2012, 07:58 AM
Oh hey, I kind of forgot this thread existed when I last posted in the Alcoholic Beverages thread. I guess since it fits here I'll cross-post for consistency, though I dunno if anybody reads this thread and not the other one...

At StellerCon this weekend, I was at the room party for the con I'm helping run later this summer, and we had a scotch tasting! Scotch is not my favorite alcoholic bevage in the world (I like some, and appreciate the complexity of most good ones, but am iffy on actually drinking more than a sip of many of them), but it was pretty fascinating. Unfortauntely I don't have notes, so I can't give a detailed report, but I especially liked a dark-colored cask strength one, and one amazing one that smelled like maple syrup (but tasted quite complicated). And then there was the little bit of a 30-year.... wow. There's a reason people pay out the nose for the good shit.

ajr82
03-21-2012, 08:24 PM
I got myself some Lagavulin 16. It seems less up-front, flavourwise, than the Talisker 10 I have, but more rich and nutty.

Edit: Also, the liquor store was handing out free samples of some clear Canadian whiskey, and it may well have been the worst alcohol I've ever tasted.

McClain
04-27-2012, 01:40 PM
Hey, here's the thread for Whiskey talk! I'm posting in here now!

I have a bottle of Jameson special reserve 12-year-old (http://www.jamesonwhiskey.com/Our-Whiskeys/Jameson-Reserves/Jameson-12-Year-Old-Special-Reserve.aspx)that I've been working on forever. I like it!

Falselogic
04-27-2012, 01:47 PM
Jim Beam!

fugu13
04-27-2012, 03:11 PM
My current Scotch selection is Bunnahabhain 12, Laphroaig Quarter Cask, and Dalwhinnie 15 (a mistake; passable, but nothing special - the Scotch I serve to people who don't drink whisky). My next bottle, which I should be getting in a month or two, I want to start spending a good bit more for. You can guess my preferences (the first two bottles are two of my favorite Scotches from the price range); anyone have any suggestions?

ajr82
04-27-2012, 03:34 PM
I really enjoy Talisker 10.

So I bought a bottle of Bulleit to go along with my bottle of Maker's (our liquor stores don't have a great bourbon selection). I don't like it as much straight, because though it seems more peppery, it doesn't have that "cut grass" earthiness I really like in Maker's. On the other hand, it makes a way better Manhattan than Maker's, for that exact reason!

fugu13
04-27-2012, 03:49 PM
I really should try Talisker, and I'll probably start with 10, but if I like 10, I'm going to have to track down a bottle of 18. Unfortunately, in Washington State we can only get hold of 10 and Distiller's Edition (which I'll probably also try).

reibeatall
04-27-2012, 11:30 PM
It wasn't until just now, in a buzzed stupor, that I realized "Scotch" was Scottish Whisky.

fugu13
04-28-2012, 02:01 PM
It's a bit more complicated than that, but yes, no whisky made outside of Scotland can be Scotch. There are a few single malt whiskys that are in the same style, though, such as the Yamazaki from Japan.

Sir Sly Ry
04-28-2012, 02:20 PM
I think I had that once before. Definitely not bad. Not sure it's worth all the pennies though. As much as I love fine whiskey/whisky, there comes a point where you're getting diminishing returns with flavor vs. cost.

Belmont
05-18-2012, 12:44 AM
I've come to the realization that I just do not care for whiskey by itself. Gin, on the other hand~

Paul le Fou
05-18-2012, 01:36 AM
I've come to the realization that I just do not care for whiskey by itself. Gin, on the other hand~

I'm not a BIG fan of whiskey straight, but I cannot stand straight gin. And I like gin.

Kirin
05-18-2012, 10:00 AM
I think I may be developing a taste for bourbon through the roundabout route of oak boarbon barrel aged beers.

Though I've also been gradually getting into Scotch via friends and acquaintances with good (expensive) Scotch collections.

Still haven't really gotten into the whole juniper berry thing, though...

Ethan
05-18-2012, 07:14 PM
My friend and brother pooled their resources to buy me a bottle of Suntory Hakushu 12 for my birthday. It's got a very fresh taste, with a grassy aroma, a slight toasted grain bitterness, and a green grape finish with a touch of mint. Good stuff. Suntory makes some great whiskies.

Alixsar
05-23-2012, 08:45 PM
Hey, remember that time I mentioned in some thread somewhere that Bulleit makes a rye whiskey but I hadn't tried it yet? Well I'm trying it now and it is really good. It's not too harsh but not too smooth. The grain taste isn't overwhelming and it's got an almost...uh...flowery? Aftertaste. Man, I am all about this right now.

Sir Sly Ry
05-24-2012, 09:13 AM
I like rye whiskey all right. Wild Turkey Rye is pretty good in my book.

Paul le Fou
05-27-2012, 10:35 PM
We ended up at an Irish bar, so I got Jameson and water. It was good! Jameson is good! I like Jameson!

Sir Sly Ry
06-02-2012, 02:26 PM
Yeah Jameson is aight.

Stephen
06-02-2012, 06:55 PM
I bought a bottle of Ardbeg 10 year last week. Smoldering, a little peaty, peppery--I really fucking like it. Not so great when the weather's hot (like the last few days), but on a cool, damp night like tonight? Oh hell yeah.

Issun
06-16-2012, 12:37 AM
Scotch is pretty great. It's my go-to non-beer alcohol. In fact, I am drinking some Chivas Regal right now!

McClain
06-16-2012, 07:18 PM
What is the best beginners scotch for the bourbon drinker?

Ethan
06-16-2012, 07:28 PM
Bourbon is spicy, so go for a spicy one, like the aforementioned Talisker 10.

Or you could just buy some Johnnie Walker Black if you don't want to lay down single malt stacks.

McClain
06-16-2012, 07:35 PM
Or you could just buy some Johnnie Walker Black if you don't want to lay down single malt stacks.

No way, if I'm gonna go scotch, I wanna drink real scotch. :D

I know I've had scotches that I liked before. I just can't remember what it was.

Sir Sly Ry
06-17-2012, 10:41 AM
What turned me onto scotch (I drank scotch before bourbon) was Glenlivet 12 year. It's solid. For something comparable Glenfiddich 12 year also works.

Ethan
06-17-2012, 10:55 AM
Those are really common as first single malts, but they have a light touch. They'd be good if you're used to Irish or Canadian whiskey. If you're already into bourbon, you can take something that's more raw.

McClain
08-29-2012, 09:42 PM
Oh my god you guys this scotch after spending the last several hours cleaning after a long day at work is like the best scotch ever.

related: I've recently discovered that I like scotch.

So, yeah, while buying my dad a birthday bottle of scotch I decided to try the base version of what I was getting him, so I got a bottle of Glenmorangie.

The only thing I really know about scotch is that I like most of what I've tried, but the one time I had something really "smokey" when I first tried it many years ago I wasn't crazy about it. I grew up a Bourbon drinker and thing got into some Irish whiskey later on, but there's something different about Scotch that I really appreciate now.

SO, scotch drinkers, what is Glenmorangie like, on the scale of things? I need to learn the lingo.

MCBanjoMike
08-30-2012, 08:08 AM
Who got a bottle of The Macallan 12 Year for his birthday? This dude. :cool:

fugu13
08-30-2012, 10:49 AM
Glenmorangie is a highland scotch, and very popular in Scotland. As a highland scotch, it tends to have sweeter flavors and much lower peat content. Glenmorangie in particular is known for not having much kick. It's hard to talk much about the flavor without knowing what bottle you acquired, as Glenmorangie is known for their finished whisky, matured in unusual barrels (they take their 10 year, which is a standard scotch, then age it two more years to make 12 years with different finishes). If you have a 10 year bottle, you'll notice typical sweeter scotch flavors, like honey and butterscotch, and probably some slightly nutty flavors (I don't think glenmorangie gets very herbal or fruity). If you have a 12 year bottle, though, the flavors will vary over a much wider range, because so much comes from the wood.

Heron
09-06-2012, 01:45 PM
I bought a bottle of Bushmills Blackbush irish whiskey some time ago and have been meaning to mention it. I have been rather enjoying it. My palate is still developing for Whiskies and such, but I can definitely start picking up hints of different flavors in it. Related, I bought the Bushmills on the recommendation of the person working there, and it was between that and Glenmorangie 10. I wanted to try something different since the Glenmorangie 10 was supposed to be like Glenlivet 12, which I enjoy.

Anyways, I was sad when I noticed that I had gone through most of the bottle as quickly as I did, since I want more, but then that's just a reason to try something new.

Kirin
09-25-2012, 09:01 AM
So my wife was out at the ABV store yesterday to pick up some dark rum for a recipe, and ended up getting me a bottle of Laphroaig 10. Tasty. I live me some nice complex smokiness in my scotch, my beer, and my cheeses.

Also apparently I can claim a square foot of the Isle of Islay now? Okay, cool.

From the descriptions in this little booklet that came with it, I'd like to try the Quarter Cask someday. But this bottle's gonna last me a while.

fugu13
09-25-2012, 10:47 AM
Yeah, Quarter Cask is definitely Laphroaig's star in that price range, though the 10 is great too. I really want to try the Laphroaig Cairdeas, and I've been lobbying local liquor stores to carry it (though I might end up just getting the Triple Wood, which I've seen around).

ajr82
09-25-2012, 06:37 PM
My scotches on hand at the moment are Talisker 10 and Lagavulin 16. I'd like to try one that's a bit different than these two, preferably closer in price to the Talisker. What would people recommend?

Paul le Fou
09-25-2012, 09:19 PM
So, I got me a bottle of good old Angostura bitters. I also have some sugar syrup onhand.

Call me a happy man, yes indeedy.

(just need some sweet vermouth now...)

Issun
10-29-2012, 09:20 PM
Hey, remember that time I mentioned in some thread somewhere that Bulleit makes a rye whiskey but I hadn't tried it yet? Well I'm trying it now and it is really good. It's not too harsh but not too smooth. The grain taste isn't overwhelming and it's got an almost...uh...flowery? Aftertaste. Man, I am all about this right now.

Just tried this stuff and Alixsar speaks truth.

Paul le Fou
11-16-2012, 05:29 AM
Well, I recently finished my bottle of Yamazaki single malt 10 year, and I thought hey, it's payday, I've been good, I'll plop down some change on another bottle of Japanese whisky, keep this journey going. I stuck with Suntory, and got the Hibiki 12, their high-end blend. I guess it's a relatively new label, too? I am excite! I'm gonna try it soon!

Kirin
12-25-2012, 11:43 AM
So at a party last friday I tasted some Ardbeg Supernova. Otherwise known as "holy crap that is one peaty motherfucking whiskey". I actually kind of enjoyed it in small doses. I think bigger doses might strip the lining from your esophagus.

Paul le Fou
12-28-2012, 11:12 AM
Well, I recently finished my bottle of Yamazaki single malt 10 year, and I thought hey, it's payday, I've been good, I'll plop down some change on another bottle of Japanese whisky, keep this journey going. I stuck with Suntory, and got the Hibiki 12, their high-end blend. I guess it's a relatively new label, too? I am excite! I'm gonna try it soon!

Oh, I did this. It's good! A little sharper on the nose than the single malt, but with a lot of sweet fruity undertones.

Got my dad some 12-year Yamazaki single malt for Christmas. Gonna try it soon!

taosterman
12-28-2012, 09:43 PM
Oh, I did this. It's good! A little sharper on the nose than the single malt, but with a lot of sweet fruity undertones.

Got my dad some 12-year Yamazaki single malt for Christmas. Gonna try it soon!

I splurged on the 18-year for my brother's Christmas present. I sampled a glass with him, and it's taaaaasty.

ajr82
01-28-2013, 02:20 PM
So I'm going down to Minneapolis in a little while, and in addition to some liqueurs I can't get at home, I'd like to pick up a bourbon or rye and want to know what I should make a priority of finding.

I can easily get (or already have) the following:
- Maker's Mark
- Bulleit
- Sazerac
- Jefferson's
- Buffalo Trace
- Knob Creek
- Jim Beam
- Woodford Reserve
as well as some of their premium brands.

So, given that, what should I make an effort to find?

Heron
07-30-2013, 05:04 PM
I've gotten to the point where I have a taste for these. I even enjoy Laphroaig a bit. Not my go to choice, but something I'd enjoy having in my cabinet. I also went back to trying some brandy that I had and I could definitely tell the difference between that and whisky.

I was running low on Glenlivet 12 and decided to save the rest for another time, and picked up a bottle of Glenmorangie 10. It is good stuff and what I prefer I think. However, I also had some Knappogue Castle and I really want to get a bottle of that at some point.

Issun
02-23-2014, 05:55 PM
If you live in the PNW or are visiting, Oregon Spirits make a whiskey called Whipper Snapper that I've been enjoying over the last couple of days. It's got what I can best describe as a smokey vanilla-caramel flavor that's not something you encounter in a whiskey really. I highly recommend it.

I also recently tried Oban. My brother got me a bottle for Christmas and we cracked it open to celebrate the Seahawks winning the Superbowl. It's got really complex, heavy flavors that are great on the tongue, but it's got an aftertaste on the burn when drunk straight that almost ruins it. Putting it on ice negates this aftertaste and lets you fully enjoy the stuff.

Paul le Fou
02-24-2014, 05:59 PM
Having tried most of biggest-named Japanese whiskies now, I think my favorite is the Taketsuru 17. It's really light and smooth with a nice honey sweetness; I find it the most drinkable of the above.

Ethan
02-26-2014, 08:28 AM
So I'm going down to Minneapolis in a little while, and in addition to some liqueurs I can't get at home, I'd like to pick up a bourbon or rye and want to know what I should make a priority of finding.



I can easily get (or already have) the following:

- Maker's Mark

- Bulleit

- Sazerac

- Jefferson's

- Buffalo Trace

- Knob Creek

- Jim Beam

- Woodford Reserve

as well as some of their premium brands.



So, given that, what should I make an effort to find?


I'm too late to be useful but I'll answer this anyway. Find a bottle of Rittenhouse Rye. It costs like 22 bucks and has a plastic cap but it is really, really good. Blows away anything in it's price range.

ajr82
02-26-2014, 03:19 PM
I'm too late to be useful but I'll answer this anyway. Find a bottle of Rittenhouse Rye. It costs like 22 bucks and has a plastic cap but it is really, really good. Blows away anything in it's price range.

I ended up getting Laird's applejack and a bottle of Marascino on that trip, but I'll keep that in mind for next time.

MCBanjoMike
02-26-2014, 05:41 PM
I was in the US last weekend, so I took advantage of the (slightly*) better prices at the airport to grab myself a big bottle of Talisker 10. I'm not a huge peat guy, but this stuff is nice and smooth despite a reasonable dose of peat and smoke. According to my cousin, who is way more into whiskies than I am, it's also the most appropriate whisk(e)y for me to drink considering where in Scotland our family is from. Anyway, it's good stuff, and while I don't like it as much as the pricier Macallan 12 that I have, I'm still glad to have it in the collection.

*stupid exchange rate

Paul le Fou
02-27-2014, 02:05 AM
I found myself at a bar where an old Scotsman named Paul berated us in good cheer for daring to order the Knockando, his favorite from near where he grew up (and what his parents would rub on his gums when he was teething) which the bar's owner stocks specially for him. It was also really tasty! Pauls have good taste, I guess.

teekun
03-23-2014, 06:28 PM
This weekend I picked up a bottle of the Glenmorangie Lasanta 12 year. Fantastic stuff. The sherry casks they use gives it a really nice sweet, fruity finish. I'm really interested in trying their other finished whiskies after this one.

McClain
03-23-2014, 06:37 PM
This weekend I picked up a bottle of the Glenmorangie Lasanta 12 year. Fantastic stuff. The sherry casks they use gives it a really nice sweet, fruity finish. I'm really interested in trying their other finished whiskies after this one.

My father is a HUGE fan of all the Glenmorangie special casks. I think the Lasanta is his favorite. The only one I remember him specifically not being a big fan of was the Astar (pretty sure that one).

I've been working on a bottle of Balvenie DoubleWood (https://us.thebalvenie.com/our-range/doublewood-aged-12-years) that's just delightful. Pretty straightforward and woody, not too sweet.

Bunk Moreland
04-12-2014, 04:18 PM
This is gonna sound like that stupid dos equis guy, but I don't drink often. When I do, I usually drink some kind of Kentucky bourbon because it's where I'm from. I'm not much of a snob on it, but I do like to drink it either straight or with a tiny amount of ice/water. What about this thread? Any other Maker's Mark et al. aficionados here?

Issun
04-13-2014, 10:55 PM
I find Maker's Mark a bit too syrupy, but I've found several Bourbons I enjoy immensly: Bulleit and Buffalo Trace mostly, though I splurged on a bottle of Angel's Envy a month ago. Still have yet to try Woodford Reserve, which is apparently the bourbon.

ajr82
04-14-2014, 10:41 AM
I like Maker's, but it has a really distinct flavour compared to every other bourbon I've tried. To me, it tastes very grassy.

McClain
04-14-2014, 11:56 AM
Makers is good but kinda mid-level to me. Woodford is better overall. I also remember really liking knob Creek last time I had it.

Paul le Fou
04-14-2014, 05:25 PM
I had some Lagavulin 16 last night at my friend's house. I did not like it at all. Is that what they call peat? Because if so I hate peat D:

Issun
04-14-2014, 05:28 PM
It might be oak. Strong oak flavors can be really present on the burn. Try smoothing it out with some ice and see how it goes down.

Bunk Moreland
04-15-2014, 05:30 AM
I only really used Maker's as a baseline for bourbon. It's good and usually worth the price, but not really fancy. Knob Creek's definitely better.

The one thing about Maker's is it's cheap and not really sufficiently great enough that you feel like you're wasting it by mixing it.

MCBanjoMike
04-15-2014, 06:17 AM
Hey, I tried Woodford Reserve for the first time this weekend. It was nice! That's about as detailed an analysis as I can give you guys for now, since I don't know much about bourbon. I do wish that you could get it so cheaply in Canada, I found it in New Hampshire for a paltry $25 a bottle and it's nearly twice that here.

Red Hedgehog
04-18-2014, 08:08 AM
So...

My wife is going down to Virginia this weekend where she says the liquor is extremely cheap and asked if she should pick something up? We already have a decent Scotch (Glenlivet 15) so I figured since she was in the south, maybe a Bourbon would be nice.

Can anyone recommend a good high end Bourbon?

Issun
04-18-2014, 07:15 PM
Should we have a separate thread for reviewing scotches, specifically single malt y/n

McClain
04-18-2014, 07:23 PM
Should we have a separate thread for reviewing scotches, specifically single malt y/n

naaaah, put it in here.

Paul le Fou
04-19-2014, 04:23 AM
This is a thread for whisk(e)y. Scotch is a whisk(e)y. I don't see the need!

Red Hedgehog
04-19-2014, 06:41 PM
Can anyone recommend a good high end Bourbon?

No one knows anything about bourbon?

I guess I'll just go by this page (http://whiskey.findthebest.com/d/c/American/Bourbon).

McClain
04-19-2014, 06:50 PM
No one knows anything about bourbon?

I guess I'll just go by this page (http://whiskey.findthebest.com/d/c/American/Bourbon).

Oh, totally missed your post.

Actually, that page is pretty good! There's several in the low-90s and 80s that I enjoy for the price. Knobb Creek and Woodford reserve are always good. I tend to like lower-proof whiskies myself, and not super sweet (all Jim Beam, even the higher-end stuff, it too sweet for me).

Paul le Fou
04-20-2014, 03:22 AM
I'm currently working on a bottle of Knob Creek, which I'm enjoying quite a bit, but it's one of the first good bourbons I've tried. It's on the more affordable/accessible side of good bourbon, too, so if you're going for something a little high-end... Hm, I have a friend who swears by Blanton's, though it might be as much from the holy hand grenade looking bottle and series collectible bottle toppers as from the bourbon itself. :P

I swear we've gone over this lately, because I asked myself. Maybe it was the drinking time thread?

Ample Vigour
04-20-2014, 07:22 PM
Blantons is a solid choice and at least 90% less likely to make you look like a prick than Pappy Van Winkle

Red Hedgehog
04-21-2014, 12:17 PM
Blantons is a solid choice and at least 90% less likely to make you look like a prick than Pappy Van Winkle

But... but... I so want to own something named "Pappy Van Winkle!" Why would it make me look like a prick.

(This is probably moot anyway as the liquor store my mother-in-law went to didn't have it)

Ample Vigour
04-21-2014, 12:30 PM
But... but... I so want to own something named "Pappy Van Winkle!" Why would it make me look like a prick.


Comes out once a year and is available for like ten seconds. More people drink it to show they can than drink it for pleasure

KCar
04-21-2014, 02:51 PM
I had a couple of fingers of Glenmorangie as a nightcap the other night. It was like drinking distilled light harvested during the Golden Hour and matured in oak. It is now a goal to have this continually in my life.

McClain
04-21-2014, 02:54 PM
Comes out once a year and is available for like ten seconds. More people drink it to show they can than drink it for pleasure

That's funny. One time I was looking for something new for my dad, who'd tried his share of different whiskies, and the dude at the liquor store had stashed a Pappy Van Winkle in the back that he pulled out for me. I didn't know it was some rare hipster bourbon. I think my dad liked it? He's more into scotch these days so it's hard to say.

E: This article (http://www.esquire.com/blogs/food-for-men/pappy-van-winkle-idiots-guide)suggests some alternatives to the stupid-rare Van Winkle, one of which is Makers' 46, which I had a bottle of recently and quite enjoyed.

Issun
06-19-2014, 05:19 PM
Bulleit has gone some much deserved love in this thread before, but I am now trying their 10 Year Bourbon and it may well be the best bourbon I've ever had.

McClain
06-19-2014, 05:47 PM
The base Four Roses is a mighty fine weeknight bourbon. I need to get a bottle of their Single Barrel and compare.

upupdowndown
06-26-2014, 09:13 AM
The Single Barrel is delightful and it's the bourbon I always have in stock. If I drank more and needed to have an everyday bourbon versus a "special" bourbon, I'd get regular Four Roses as my everyday bourbon.

Red Hedgehog
06-26-2014, 01:20 PM
Oh, so I forgot to share the nice Bourbon my mother-in-law got me when she was in Virginia a couple months ago:
http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll14/red_hedgehog/IMG_20140625_215224894_zps7fa12f5f.jpg (http://s284.photobucket.com/user/red_hedgehog/media/IMG_20140625_215224894_zps7fa12f5f.jpg.html)

I... still haven't cracked it open. Waiting for a special occasion? Or just lazy.

Red Hedgehog
07-07-2014, 02:04 PM
I... still haven't cracked it open. Waiting for a special occasion? Or just lazy.

Finally tried it this weekend. It goes down very smooth. Now that I've had it straight, wonder if it's worth mixing it in something or if that would be sacrilege.

ajr82
08-19-2014, 12:13 PM
Your Craft Whiskey Is Probably From A Factory Distillery In Indiana (http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/07/28/your-craft-whiskey-is-probably-from-a-factory-distillery-in-indiana.html)

Issun
08-19-2014, 09:20 PM
Eh, I already knew about that, but I'll still drink Bulleit Rye because it has a distinctive flavor that I really enjoy, probably from their casks. Plus they charge a pretty reasonable price, and they still distill their own bourbon.

I was not aware Angel's Envy was also supplied by MGP, and they can fuck off for marking that shit up to $100 dollars a bottle.

Bunk Moreland
08-23-2014, 07:41 PM
I toured Woodford Reserve's distillery last Friday (the 15th). It was pretty interesting. Highlights: An incline railroad they built for transporting empty barrels to their storage house, a great story about their waiting area for Prohibition inspectors (they built them a house without a bathroom), a couple samples of their bourbon and a bourbon ball.

Issun
08-24-2014, 01:33 AM
I thin it says something about how my palate and knowledge have expanded in the last decade that I just consider Glenlivet to be a really good scotch rather than the be-all-end-all of whiskeydom.

Cyrael
09-15-2014, 07:17 PM
Tonights tweets are brought to you by Bulleit Kentucky Bourbon.

I have only had this and Woodford Reserve. Any others I should try to experience with my incredibly limited palate?

Issun
09-15-2014, 08:50 PM
Buffalo Trace is also good, and if you can get the Bulleit 10 Year it is incredible.

Also, not a bourbon, but if you can get ahold of Tincup whiskey, it is very smooth and delicious.

MooMoo
10-05-2014, 02:18 AM
Guys, I dunno if you can help me here, but I'm kind of curious about this. I don't normally drink whiskey, but in the last few times I've drank, I've had a few whiskeys instead of what I would normally drink. Oddly, last night when I started drinking, I also started sneezing, became wheezy, and started itching all night. Am I allergic to whiskey? I had Whyte and Mackay and JD which I never drink (may not have ever drank really, I sipped JD about 10 years ago). Is this a thing? Google is saying it could be, kinda shit if it is as I was really getting into whiskey. :/

Parish
10-05-2014, 04:36 AM
Bulleit has gone some much deserved love in this thread before, but I am now trying their 10 Year Bourbon and it may well be the best bourbon I've ever had.

I keep thinking I should buy one of those. But I currently have five bottles of whisky/whiskey on my bar, which is enough to hold me over for probably another two years.

Cyrael
10-08-2014, 08:14 AM
I looked for the 10 year Bulleit, but I guess our stores don't stock them. SO instead I picked up the Rye alternative as a change of pace. I like it a lot!

Egarwaen
10-08-2014, 09:24 AM
Oddly, last night when I started drinking, I also started sneezing, became wheezy, and started itching all night. Am I allergic to whiskey?

I have multiple food allergies - milk, egg, nuts, peanuts, and shellfish - in addition to pollen, dander, and mold sensitivities.

I strongly recommend consulting an allergist. While the field is still - really - in its infancy, they'll be able to give you a much more concrete answer and back it up with actual medicine as opposed to just gut instinct and personal experience. Definitely do not drink more of whatever set you off without doing so; food allergies can be potentially life-threatening, and response time matters - they're most dangerous when you're unprepared.

That said... Maybe! What you describe is one of several typical food allergy reactions. Others include a rising sense of panic and unease, hives forming in or near your mouth or throat, dizziness, an itchy palate, difficulty swallowing, and losing your sense of taste.

upupdowndown
10-08-2014, 10:07 AM
I looked for the 10 year Bulleit, but I guess our stores don't stock them. SO instead I picked up the Rye alternative as a change of pace. I like it a lot!

Bulleit Rye is probably my favorite rye.

I agree with McClain on the bourbon tip, try Four Roses - even base Four Roses is pretty good, but the Single Barrel stuff is great. It's even better if you can get the Single Barrel - Barrel Strength version.

MooMoo
10-08-2014, 12:07 PM
I have multiple food allergies - milk, egg, nuts, peanuts, and shellfish - in addition to pollen, dander, and mold sensitivities.

I strongly recommend consulting an allergist. While the field is still - really - in its infancy, they'll be able to give you a much more concrete answer and back it up with actual medicine as opposed to just gut instinct and personal experience. Definitely do not drink more of whatever set you off without doing so; food allergies can be potentially life-threatening, and response time matters - they're most dangerous when you're unprepared.

That said... Maybe! What you describe is one of several typical food allergy reactions. Others include a rising sense of panic and unease, hives forming in or near your mouth or throat, dizziness, an itchy palate, difficulty swallowing, and losing your sense of taste.Thanks, I'll try and ask my doctor sometime soon. :)

Paul le Fou
10-08-2014, 12:56 PM
I went to Radiator Whiskey, a popular restaurant here in Seattle, and got the - ok wait I have to tell you this first

Their Manhattan cocktail list is called the Manhattan Project. The cocktails are: the Einstein, the Oppenheimer, the Frisch, the Bohr, and the McMillan

Anyway, I got the Frisch, which was made with a smoked rye. It started off pleasant and got progressively less so. It actually just tasted like fire by the end, and the nice smoky flavor had turned into a sharp acrid smoke taste not unlike the ashes of your childhood home. It was a new experience that I'm glad I've had and am even more glad not to repeat.

Ample Vigour
10-08-2014, 03:33 PM
The friendly local is out of Yamazaki 12 yr so it's time to go on a hunt for whisky

McClain
08-30-2015, 10:27 PM
Let's talk ice!

I got a pretty nice set of huge whiskey ice trays, the big 2" silicone cube kind. They worked great for a couple of months before developing a weird, kinda waxy residue, which is apparently sometimes an issue with silicone molds (http://matthew-rowley.blogspot.com/2011/02/what-is-that-white-film-on-my-silicone.html).

I was thinking about going full hipster and try to find a large metal ice tray, but I wanted to ask if anyone on here had any experience with that kind of thing, and if someone has a recommendation. I found this one on amazon (http://smile.amazon.com/Onyx-Stainless-Steel-ICE001-Slot/dp/B0027V9OR0/ref=pd_sim_79_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=081WY29C7EEXJM8MR5P0), but I feel like the price is too high and the cubes could be bigger.

What say you, Talking Time Drinkers?

MCBanjoMike
08-31-2015, 06:36 AM
If you want cubes - and I mean the kind that are sharp enough to cut a motherfucker - then I think this (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008F4TIG0?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00) is a fantastic option. I tend to avoid silicon ice molds because I find they take on freezer smells really quickly, but this one is made of hard plastic and I have been using it for months without incident. I also prefer trays that are closed, because it keeps the ice itself from tasting nasty, so that's another point in its favor. The cubes it makes are gorgeous, super sharp and pointy, the only downside is that the tray takes up more space in your freezer than it probably needs to. Between this and my Tovolo sphere molds (also not made of silicon), all my fancy ice needs are well taken care of.

Speaking of whisky paraphernalia, I just got two Glencairn tasting glasses (http://www.amazon.com/Glencairn-Crystal-Whiskey-Tasting-Glass/dp/B005LR3P1I/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1441028133&sr=8-2&keywords=glencairn&pebp=1441028078516&perid=07601CXNH0HHQCB26YA9) for my birthday from my aunt and uncle. They look really nice! I wanted to try them out last night, but I wasn't able to get them washed until just before bedtime and at that point I wasn't in the mood for scotch. Maybe tonight!

Ample Vigour
11-12-2015, 03:14 PM
Sven got me thinking about Walker. Obviously Red is only good for mixing, but it's been ten years since I drank JW Black.

Blue seems like the Corvette or Gucci of scotch - good mostly for showing people that you didn't always have money. What else have people sampled?

Issun
11-12-2015, 05:04 PM
What do you mix scotch with besides club soda?

McClain
11-12-2015, 05:06 PM
What do you mix scotch with besides club soda?

If it's cheap, maybe ginger beer/ale? I like the occasional bourbon and ginger and Dark and Stormys, so if figure scotch would work, too.

Reinforcements
11-12-2015, 05:59 PM
What do you mix scotch with besides club soda?

Drambuie and bitters to make a rusty nail!

Parish
11-12-2015, 06:19 PM
Four Roses was on sale when I made my quarterly "work up the energy to go find an ABC Store" trip, so I picked up a bottle. Looking forward to trying it after seeing its praises sung here!

Tefari
11-12-2015, 06:31 PM
So my dad likes whiskey and scotch and people's posts here and there have gotten me thinking I might want to buy him something good for Christmas but I'm also not especially moneyed. He's the kind of guy who likes Lagavulin and whatnot. Is there anything I can get him that might be a surprise that won't also make me miss rent?

Ample Vigour
11-12-2015, 06:35 PM
So my dad likes whiskey and scotch and people's posts here and there have gotten me thinking I might want to buy him something good for Christmas but I'm also not especially moneyed. He's the kind of guy who likes Lagavulin and whatnot. Is there anything I can get him that might be a surprise that won't also make me miss rent?

Knob Creek Single Barrel. $35/bottle and has flavor to spare.

The Raider Dr. Jones
11-12-2015, 07:53 PM
Drambuie and bitters to make a rusty nail!

Or make a Manhattan with it and you've got a Rob Roy.

Issun
11-12-2015, 10:11 PM
Or make a Manhattan with it and you've got a Rob Roy.

I loathe vermouth, so all that stuff is out. I do need to try Drambuie though.

TK Flash
11-25-2015, 05:26 AM
I have recently found myself in possession of two (2) bottles of shitty whiskey. What's the best way to mix it and consume it without killing my tastebuds?

MCBanjoMike
11-25-2015, 06:20 AM
I have recently found myself in possession of two (2) bottles of shitty whiskey. What's the best way to mix it and consume it without killing my tastebuds?

See the aforementioned Manhattan. Failing that, ginger ale?

Ample Vigour
11-25-2015, 08:27 AM
Ginger ale, soda water, or make a hot toddy.

Paul le Fou
11-25-2015, 08:41 AM
You'd need a Damn good vermouth to hide shitty whiskey in a Manhattan; better vermouth than the whiskey would ever warrant. It's a paradox, don't fall into its trap!

Similarly soda water doesn't mask flavor that well in my experience.

I recommend your flavored soda of choice (cola, ginger ale, whatever). The far better answer is a hot toddy though.

Büge
11-25-2015, 09:38 AM
Silverware polish.

TK Flash
11-25-2015, 06:29 PM
I will go the hot toddy route, and failing that, flavored soda. I don't know if they have ginger ale here, but I think they do. I doubt there is a single bottle of decent vermouth in this entire country, so I will not even bother looking. Thanks!

ajr82
12-01-2015, 01:50 PM
The whiskey sour is a great way to mask shitty whiskey, especially with a little egg white for smoothness and creaminess.

The other option is to save it for guests who can't tell the difference.

Kirin
12-02-2015, 09:02 AM
At a friend's house over Thanksgiving break we were making cocktails and were out of milk/cream, brandy, and everything citrus which left limited options. So for me we made up something with Benedictine, Creme de Cacao, and whiskey. It was tasty, and I don't imagine it depended too much on the quality of the whiskey.

pudik
12-16-2015, 11:52 AM
So my dad likes whiskey and scotch and people's posts here and there have gotten me thinking I might want to buy him something good for Christmas but I'm also not especially moneyed. He's the kind of guy who likes Lagavulin and whatnot. Is there anything I can get him that might be a surprise that won't also make me miss rent?

I could be quite late, but Laphroaig 10 yr (e: or one of the cheap Bowmore varieties because it will be likely cheaper but still good) is probably pick of the litter when it comes to relatively cheap scotch, and it's still an Islay so it's almost like Lagavulin jr or something.

MooMoo
07-23-2016, 06:24 PM
Can someone attempt to explain the colours on Johnny Walker in terms of flavour please? I was trying to decide on whiskey on the shop earlier and a JW black was on offer. Also sold was red and gold, but in terms of description they all sounded similar.

Left with a pretty nice Talisker. Not as peaty as it promised, but reasonable price anyway.

Cyrael
08-03-2016, 12:25 PM
Spent some time in Austin, and ended up having some Angel's Envy J.W. Blend. It was pretty awesome.

I also went for their Rye and it was also amazing.

Why can't they distribute in Utah? ;_;

McClain
08-03-2016, 02:10 PM
Can someone attempt to explain the colours on Johnny Walker in terms of flavour please? I was trying to decide on whiskey on the shop earlier and a JW black was on offer. Also sold was red and gold, but in terms of description they all sounded similar.

Left with a pretty nice Talisker. Not as peaty as it promised, but reasonable price anyway.

I was curious myself and the wikipedia page has a pretty detailed chart (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnnie_Walker#Standard_blends). Though TBH I never really thought of JW as more than a mixer scotch.

I'm usually a bourbon man, but I do like Macallan quite a bit.

Ample Vigour
08-08-2016, 08:21 AM
Walker Red is good for mixing, but you get a better value from J&B or Cutty Sark. Walker Black is inoffensive on ice, and Walker Gold, et al make fantastic gifts. Everyone should drink JW Blue once just to say they have.

The Raider Dr. Jones
08-08-2016, 08:40 AM
Why can't they distribute in Utah? ;_;

You guys have High West right in the neighborhood, though.

McClain
08-08-2016, 08:46 AM
Forgot to post here, but for Christmas I got a bottle of Breckenridge Bourbon that was quite nice. Made with Rocky Mountain snow and smooth as silk. I raised an eyebrow at "bourbon" made in Colorado, but whatever you want to call it, it's good whiskey.

Cyrael
08-10-2016, 07:39 AM
You guys have High West right in the neighborhood, though.

I've only tried the High West Campfire, and was sorely unimpressed. I should give the Rye a try. Or in fact, I should just hit up the distillery for a tasting - it's only about 45 minutes away.

Paul le Fou
08-10-2016, 12:54 PM
There was a high west on the rye flight I had a while back and it was real good, but I can't remember which variant it was.

I've become a full-fledged Rye Man. It is my whiskey style of choice by a wide margin, and I think I even have a brand. James Oliver is only a little more expensive than Bulleit, usually on sale for the same price as bulleit at my local, and is ~really tasty~. Once I even sprang for some Templeton and it was dang good but I honestly preferred the James Oliver.

I think this means I'm an old man now

Issun
08-14-2016, 07:34 PM
James Oliver is only a little more expensive than Bulleit, usually on sale for the same price as bulleit at my local, and is ~really tasty~.

You ain't kidding. Bought a bottle of this and it is soooo good.