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blinkpen
01-20-2010, 10:51 PM
Mmm mm. Guys. I just grabbed a packet of mushroom flavored ramen noodles, right. I boiled the water, dumped in the noodles, then, get this, I crack an egg, I mix it up with a fork, and after the noodles are done boiling, just after, I turn off the heat and pour in the egg while stirring thoroughly. Then I add the seasoning.

Delicious!

Rosencrantz
01-20-2010, 11:00 PM
We do instant ramen a lot, too. About every week or two I'll bake delicious pork chops, and freeze the leftovers. Later, we'll reheat the chops, cut 'em up, and have them with pork-flavored noodles. Oh, and we only use about half of the seasoning packet to reduce some of the insanely high sodium.

Issun
01-20-2010, 11:02 PM
I find the only thing you need to make Top Ramen edible is hot sauce.

MarsDragon
01-20-2010, 11:06 PM
I haven't had Top Ramen for awhile, but I eat a lot of curry (because it is quite literally the only thing I know how to cook). One giant pack of Korean curry powder has kept me going for months now, and it only takes some rice, a potato, and a couple carrots to make at the most basic level. Delicious and almost as high in sodium as Ramen!

gamin
01-20-2010, 11:07 PM
Very nice. I find that half the seasoning packet in Top Ramen is enough for me. I'm not a big fan of salt, and so I'd rather avoid getting more then I really need.

dwolfe
01-21-2010, 06:51 AM
Why not use all the packet and just...dont' eat the salty broth except what comes up with the noodles?

Plus, use more water than recommended.

Kirin
01-21-2010, 08:22 AM
I love these instant Japanese summer-festival-themed yakisoba packs I picked up from an Asian market, though I'm sure they're terrible for me. Comes with a barbecue-y sauce and mayo and a spice packet all separate. Drain off the water and mix. Delcious matsuri time!

Ethan
01-21-2010, 08:26 AM
This should probably just be retitled to the individually packaged noodles thread.

I enjoy taking single-bowl packs of udon noodles and adding my own dried seaweed.

taosterman
01-21-2010, 09:26 AM
Ramen is pretty much the base answer for this kind of thread. It's like a heavenly net that ties together so many beautiful, fatty ingredients. In the last year I've taken to pan-frying, and it's a miracle that my weight has held steady.

teg
01-22-2010, 07:04 AM
I like to add diced red peppers and/or green or red onions to my instant ramen while it's boiling. In the case of spicy chicken flavour, I add chunks of microwaveable bacon afterward. No, really.
I also boil it longer and drain some of the water so that the flavour is stronger.

Marfy
01-22-2010, 08:53 AM
I guess ramen isn't that cheap over here in Scotland. There is no equivalent to the 6 pack for a dollar or so, whatever brand that is. An individual cup is about 60 pence (~$1.10), and the 4-packs were I think nearly 3 pounds (~$4.50). Only one brand had the 4 pack available and only two flavors. It was much cheaper to buy a big bag of pasta that'll last me forever.

Calorie Mate
01-22-2010, 10:21 AM
Brickroad once posted a recipe wherein you brown some meat (or fake meat), make some maccaroni, and dump two cans of cream of mushroom soup in there and mix it all together. It has since become a regular meal at our house.

dwolfe
01-22-2010, 11:05 AM
I guess ramen isn't that cheap over here in Scotland. There is no equivalent to the 6 pack for a dollar or so, whatever brand that is. An individual cup is about 60 pence (~$1.10), and the 4-packs were I think nearly 3 pounds (~$4.50). Only one brand had the 4 pack available and only two flavors. It was much cheaper to buy a big bag of pasta that'll last me forever.

We're talking bricks of it, not Cups. The cups in the US are about 80-99 cents even outside a city.

Marfy
01-22-2010, 01:21 PM
We're talking bricks of it, not Cups. The cups in the US are about 80-99 cents even outside a city.

Well, yeah. What I was trying to say is that bricks don't even exist, as far as I could find at my local megamart. I never get cups at home. Too expensive for what you're getting.

dwolfe
01-24-2010, 11:12 PM
Ah, ok. Literally, you can get bricks of ramen for 5/6 for $1 vs 1 styrofoam cup of ramen for 1$ anywhere* in the USA.

*Walmart or most supermarkets

Lakupo
01-25-2010, 12:59 AM
I've seen the cups even cheaper these days, on sale for 50 cents or so on occasion, and I grabbed a cup noodle at Wal-Mart for 28 cents the other days. (one of the maruchan microwave noodle things was 86 cents). Of course, Wal-Mart is an unrealistic barometric for prices.

KCar
01-25-2010, 04:03 AM
Guys, you're doing this kind of thread wrong. Eating cheap doesn't mean loading up on trans fats.

Fry some ginger in some sesame oil, and then then stirfry in some chopped cabbage and a tin of salmon. Add a dash of soy sauce, serve on rice. Surprisingly delicious, and only about 3-4 dollars for several meals' worth.

Brickroad
01-25-2010, 04:12 AM
Brickroad once posted a recipe wherein you brown some meat (or fake meat), make some maccaroni, and dump two cans of cream of mushroom soup in there and mix it all together. It has since become a regular meal at our house.

We have no idea what to call it, so it's just "hamburger goop". My mother made it all the time when we were kids, and she didn't know what it was called either.

estragon
01-25-2010, 05:44 AM
We have no idea what to call it, so it's just "hamburger goop". My mother made it all the time when we were kids, and she didn't know what it was called either.

It sounds like a really simple beef stroganoff.

That's probably what it's called.

You can make francy version of it too, but the "hamburger goop" version is a pretty decent simple meal.

Dadgum Roi
01-25-2010, 06:03 AM
I got these microwaveable Jamaican beef patties at Piggly Wiggly yesterday that are incredible. My oldest kid hates spicy food and he ate half of it with me.

John
01-25-2010, 06:29 AM
We have no idea what to call it, so it's just "hamburger goop". My mother made it all the time when we were kids, and she didn't know what it was called either.

We did the same thing, called the same thing! We also had a "tuna goop" which was a can or two of tuna, some cream of mushroom soup, and some frozen peas. Serve over toast, very cheap and easy. It's basically the building blocks of a tuna casserole, without the hour wait time.