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View Full Version : I need some eggselent advice


Calorie Mate
04-27-2010, 02:24 PM
So I learned how to make an omlette this weekend. It was kind of neat - so now I need advice on how to make THE BEST OMLETTE EVER! (Whatever that may be.)

We could also talk about other egg-related things here, too, I guess. Scrambled eggs are delicious, for example.

We could also just get the egg puns out of the way right now, if that will make you feel better.

taidan
04-27-2010, 02:29 PM
I make egg and cheese on a bagel almost every morning for breakfast, because I need something relatively filling to eat when I take my sleep medicine in the morning. I don't do anything fancy, because it has to be quick, but I've been doing this for over a year and still haven't really gotten tired of 'em.

Alixsar
04-27-2010, 02:31 PM
All omelets are the the best omelets ever. Name one time you've had a bad omelet. YOU CANT they are delicious

ringworm
04-27-2010, 02:31 PM
I eat a lot of eggs, especially when I'm trying to build muscle/lost weight. Low-calorie, high protein. The meat I use (if I use meat) varies, but tends to be bacon. For veggies I like the red pepper/jalapeno pepper/mushroom combo.

I also like putting some tobasco in the egg mixture for a little kick.

NevznachaY
04-27-2010, 02:34 PM
Tortilla. Frittatas. Eggs Benedict.

Dizzy
04-27-2010, 02:34 PM
I haven't eaten an egg dish I didn't like. If the risk of salmonella wasn't so great I'd gulp them down like Gaston. No kidding!

I vaguely remember how to make them, but scrambled eggs and melted cheese is so good.

NevznachaY
04-27-2010, 02:41 PM
Also, homemade mayonnaise.

(Dizzy, for lower salmonella infection risk, try eating raw quail eggs).

Balrog
04-27-2010, 02:46 PM
I always put white onion, red pepper and shredded cheddar in mine. I usually grill the peppers and onions first though, and cut in long strips, done of that dicing nonsense.

ravinoff
04-27-2010, 03:02 PM
You can't go wrong with onions and pepper varieties of your preference. Bacon is a staple but other meat selections that are very much worth consideration are chorizo or smoked salmon. I recently made a excellent omelette with feta cheese, mushrooms, onions and leftover steak sliced very very thin.

Really think of a savory ingredient you like that would go well with eggs, think of a couple other things that compliment that, have an awesome omelette. Experimentation is one of the best part of cooking.

EDIT: I just remembered years ago I made an omelette with grated parmesan, prosciutto, and wild mushrooms (chanterelles). That was quite possible the best egg related meal I have ever had.

bdazzld
04-27-2010, 03:02 PM
Pico de Gallo (sp?) awesome mixed in with eggs, mushrooms swiss little bit of pepper...

if it's good on a burger...probably pretty good with eggs?

Lately I've been having egg beaters and bagel/thin for breakfast with laughing cow cheese in various flavors. Micro in a bowl with whatever add-ins, toast bagel/thin, smear cheese on it, toss egg on it, add whatever else (ketchup, tabasco, salt pepper, etc).


SO GOOD.

Western Bagel Alternative Bagels are delicious and low calorie and go great with eggs. (not that everyone/anyone is concerned about that just tossing that out there for folks)

Sven
04-27-2010, 03:09 PM
FOOLPROOF BI-FOLD OMLETTE:

1. Add 1 tbsp of water for every egg.

2. Medium heat on the pan.

3. Whip the crap outta your eggs. You need foam.

4. Butter more than you think you'll need.

5. Stir gently until you see some curds forming, then scrape down the sides. Swirl the pan and scrape down the sides again, repeat until you've got very little loose egg in the pan. This adds to the structural integrity of the final product, as the thicker rim holds everything together.

6. Let stand for 10-15 seconds. This is when you grab your filling. The egg should be done setting when you're back.

7. Move the pan so the handle's facing you.

8. Filling right down the middle.

9. Fold left edge over filling, leaving 1/3 uncovered by the folded flap.

10. Slide out of the pan, flipping the folded section over the unfolded side.

Simple, and much cooler than a lame single-folded sample.

And there's very little that won't go well. I tend to do a simple cheese filling, then serve it over pancackes with a bit of syrup.

Next - when I'm home - I will explain how to make the most awesome thing ever: the breakfast souffle.

DemoWeasel
04-27-2010, 03:09 PM
I nearly blew my house up the last time I tried to fry an egg.

I am the WORST at cooking.

Violentvixen
04-27-2010, 03:18 PM
Scrambled eggs with spinach, feta and artichoke hearts.

BodhiTraveller
04-27-2010, 03:48 PM
One category to introduce is what ingredients are best inside an omlette, and what are best on top of an omlette.

For example, I would say that salsa and anything spicy is better served atop an omlette, rather than within.

Sheana
04-27-2010, 03:48 PM
Eggs are always delicious, in all forms.

After watching an old Julia Child episode about eggs I tried the thing where you break a whole egg or two into buttered custard dishes, put stuff like a little heavy cream on top, and then stick them in a pan of simmering water in a broiling oven for several minutes. Oh man, delicious. Incredibly rich and fattening though, and only to be done once in a while. But delicious!

Red Hedgehog
04-27-2010, 03:49 PM
I'm a peppers and onions kinda guy (grilled or sauteed first), I'll also add whatever I have around the house: cheese, mushrooms, zuchini, garlic, anything leftover from previous nights' dinner.

Ethan
04-27-2010, 03:53 PM
I was into the bi-fold for many years, but then I saw the Julia Child omelette, and the Julia Child omelette is now the only omelette. A bit of water mixed with the eggs, lots of butter, very high heat, vigorous shaking, salt, pepper, and a sprinkling of chopped green herbs. No cheese. The best. If the eggs are in the pan for more than 60 seconds, you didn't do it right.

SlimJimm
04-27-2010, 06:59 PM
The best thing to add to any kind of eggs is a bit minced basil. I love the flavor it adds to omelettes, scrambled, sunny side up, or even poached eggs.
Just crack 2 eggs, scramble it a bit, add some basil, parsley, minced onions and anything else you like with omlettes, flip it once, throw a slice of cheese over it and throw it all on a toasted english muffin.

NevznachaY
04-28-2010, 12:24 AM
You should try making an omelette by substituing water with milk. So tender.

Sheana
04-28-2010, 02:42 AM
Yeah, I've never heard of adding water before, I've always added a bit of milk to my beaten eggs.

Sven
04-28-2010, 06:23 AM
Yeah, I've never heard of adding water before, I've always added a bit of milk to my beaten eggs.

Water ariates a bit better, although skim milk is acceptable.

Paul le Fou
04-28-2010, 07:38 AM
Rice. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omurice)

Kirin
04-28-2010, 07:45 AM
My wife and I just made some eggy stuff for dinner, loosely based on a Bon Apetit recipe. I don't have the details, but it involved eggs, finely-diced tofu, thin-sliced leeks, sour cream, and grated parmesan on top. Pretty tasty.

The bestest omelette I ever had was at a restaurant in Asheville NC, and involved carmelized onions, goat chesse, and prosciutto. My mouth is watering jsut thinking about it.


The best thing to add to any kind of eggs is a bit minced basil. I love the flavor it adds to omelettes, scrambled, sunny side up, or even poached eggs.
Just crack 2 eggs, scramble it a bit, add some basil, parsley, minced onions and anything else you like with omlettes, flip it once, throw a slice of cheese over it and throw it all on a toasted english muffin.

Hmm, I just planted some new basil plants in my garden, I'll have to try this later when they've grown big enough to harvest some. Fresh herbs ftw.

Paul le Fou
04-28-2010, 07:58 AM
The bestest omelette I ever had was at a restaurant in Asheville NC, and involved carmelized onions, goat chesse, and prosciutto. My mouth is watering jsut thinking about it.

...so is mine. D:

R^2
04-28-2010, 09:52 AM
Eggs are one of my favorite foods ever. EVER.

It was not long ago, however, that I discovered I'd been making scrambled eggs wrong all this time. They should cook on incredibly low heat, so that they don't start to curdle when they first go in the pan. Instead they heat gently in the pan until they reach that magic protein-coagulating temperature, and start to adhere together into tiny curds in the space of about thirty seconds.

Sour cream. Salsa or hot sauce. glom nom nom nom nom

Reinforcements
04-28-2010, 10:05 AM
Hmm, I just planted some new basil plants in my garden, I'll have to try this later when they've grown big enough to harvest some. Fresh herbs ftw.
Thyme is really good in eggs, too.

This thread made me remember that I haven't had soft-boiled eggs in a long time. I should get on that.

Calorie Mate
04-28-2010, 10:15 AM
Lately I've been having egg beaters and bagel/thin for breakfast with laughing cow cheese in various flavors.

It's like you and my girlfriend are the same person.

I was into the bi-fold for many years, but then I saw the Julia Child omelette, and the Julia Child omelette is now the only omelette. A bit of water mixed with the eggs, lots of butter, very high heat, vigorous shaking, salt, pepper, and a sprinkling of chopped green herbs. No cheese. The best. If the eggs are in the pan for more than 60 seconds, you didn't do it right.

I'm...going to have to investigate this.

ringworm
04-28-2010, 10:18 AM
very high heat
incredibly low heat
SOMEONE IS LYING

Kylie
04-28-2010, 11:42 AM
Very high heat works if you're very, very good at cooking the eggs. If you're slow, then you've ruined yourself some eggs. Low heat doesn't ensure good eggs, but it gives you more room for error.

High heat more often turns out the crusty-type diner-omelettes, which, while not bad, ain't the classic french style.

Reinforcements
04-28-2010, 11:49 AM
I question the use of "very high" heat. If I turned my stove up to anywhere near the highest setting it would burn the butter faster than you could say "Shit I've burned the butter".

Ethan
04-28-2010, 12:34 PM
That's actually the key to Julia Child's method. You should melt the butter very quickly, coat the pan, and throw the eggs in just as you see a hint of brown in the butter. Ideally you'll be using enough of it so that it doesn't really burn before this point. It's all about timing. The reward is an unthinkable level of fluffiness.

NevznachaY
04-28-2010, 12:36 PM
Know what complements eggs very well? Nutmeg, and lots of it.

Ethan
04-28-2010, 01:00 PM
FYI, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWmvfUKwBrg

My method takes about twice as long because the eggs need to be solid enough to break loose from cast iron.

ringworm
04-28-2010, 01:15 PM
Know what complements eggs very well? Nutmeg, and lots of it.
So much nutmeg! (http://www.truthtree.com/Nutmeg.shtml)

Marfy
04-28-2010, 01:22 PM
As much as it pains me to say it, Paula Deen's scrambled egg (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/the-ladys-perfect-scrambled-eggs-recipe/index.html)s are really good. Really, it's just cheese eggs with sour cream and goddamn is it good. I usually use low or lower fat sour cream and it turns out fine.

taosterman
04-28-2010, 02:15 PM
SHAKSHUKA. (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/04/shakshuka/)

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4072/4502340031_7179576398.jpg

ravinoff
04-28-2010, 03:06 PM
SHAKSHUKA. (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/04/shakshuka/)

That sounds fantastic. Think I'm gonna have to try making that later this week.

Red Hedgehog
04-29-2010, 09:39 AM
SHAKSHUKA. (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/04/shakshuka/)

Shakshuka is great. So great.

R^2
04-29-2010, 12:19 PM
The way I described, the eggs are gently brought up to about 130 degrees, and then suddenly magic happens and you take them out of the pan.

I used to use high heat, and got uneven curdling and brown butter and all sorts of not-as-good-as-eggs-deserve sorts of things.

NevznachaY
04-29-2010, 12:45 PM
So much nutmeg! (http://www.truthtree.com/Nutmeg.shtml)

Mind blown.

Kylie
04-29-2010, 02:02 PM
Agreed, shaksuka is amazing. I like to ladle it over a nice thick brown bread so as to have something to soak it up with.

Basically anytime you can poach eggs in something that isn't water, you make the situation even better -- poaching in red wine makes Oeufs Meurettes, which is awesome with mushrooms, onions, and maybe brioche.

ravinoff
04-29-2010, 09:02 PM
SHAKSHUKA. (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/04/shakshuka/)

That sounds fantastic. Think I'm gonna have to try making that later this week.

I ended up making this tonight, it was indeed quite fantastic.

Daikaiju
05-01-2010, 12:40 PM
My dad scarred me for omlets. When I was younger he would make these things... Frozen veggies, lunchmeat & cheese ends (the heels from deli meats and cheeses, packaged sold as an assortment) and anything in the fridge about to hit it's expire date.

One memorable creation had gray runoff... GRAY.


Oh the horror...

MCBanjoMike
05-01-2010, 05:36 PM
I ended up making this tonight, it was indeed quite fantastic.

I did too, and it was. Trouble is, I handled the jalapenos with my left hand while chopping them and the oil seems to have burned the hell out of my fingers. Seriously, this hurts like a son of a bitch. If I ever make this recipe again, I'm going to get some fucking gloves.

OW FUCK DAMN

mablem8
05-01-2010, 05:46 PM
Here's my breakfast omelet sandwich recipe:

Ingredients:
2 tsp olive oil
1/2 Roma tomato, diced
2 green onions, diced
sliced mushrooms
4 large egg whites
freshly ground black pepper
fresh basil leaves
2 slices toast (I use whole wheat)

Directions:
1. In a ten-inch nonstick pan, saute tomato, green onion, and mushrooms in olive oil.
2. Add egg whites and top with freshly ground black pepper, pushing edges towards center.
3. Fold into small omelet (in half and in half again) and flip to cook both sides.
4. Place omelet on toast. Top with fresh basil leaves followed by second slice of toast.
5. Return to pan and heat, flipping to avoid excessive blackening of the toast.

To use just the egg white of a large egg, watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-OwbEy-Vxk
He takes a long time to explain a pretty simple process; you can probably just skip to the 2:00 minute mark and be fine.

Of course, if you use the whole egg, then only two or three eggs would be necessary.

ravinoff
05-01-2010, 07:54 PM
I did too, and it was. Trouble is, I handled the jalapenos with my left hand while chopping them and the oil seems to have burned the hell out of my fingers. Seriously, this hurts like a son of a bitch. If I ever make this recipe again, I'm going to get some fucking gloves.

OW FUCK DAMN

I have burned various body parts (especially mucous membranes!) handing peppers over the years but I think my fingers are impervious.

A former roommate and I managed to effectively pepper spray the kitchen and surrounding area while using a food processor to make a hot sauce that (among other peppers) had a bunch of habeneros.

Another roommate approached the kitchen at one point, then rapidly turned around with a cry of "aaaaahhhhhhhggghhahhh" and ran away.

The hot sauce turned out quite nicely.

Violentvixen
05-01-2010, 10:02 PM
A former roommate and I managed to effectively pepper spray the kitchen and surrounding area while using a food processor to make a hot sauce that (among other peppers) had a bunch of habeneros.

Another roommate approached the kitchen at one point, then rapidly turned around with a cry of "aaaaahhhhhhhggghhahhh" and ran away.

The hot sauce turned out quite nicely.

I love this.

My extended family makes a lot of quiche so when I recently had a lot of leftover broccoli, asparagus, parmesean and cheddar that's what I made.

I made this crust (http://www.recipezaar.com/recipe/Quick-n-Easy-Quiche-Crust-18185) which doesn't require baking ahead of time and tasted great. However, I would have doubled it as it was a bit thin for my taste.

I then adapted this recipe (http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Broccoli-Garlic-Quiche-354952) for the filling as follows:

* 10 ounces (1-inch-wide) broccoli florets (with 1 to 2 inches of stem attached)
* half a bunch of asparagus (.25-.5 pound), chopped into thirds
* 2 tablespoons chopped garlic
* 6 large eggs
* 1 1/2 cup skim milk
* 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
* 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
* 5 ounces extra-sharp Cheddar, coarsely grated (2 cups)
* 1/4 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
* Equipment: a 9 1/2-inch deep-dish pie plate

Heat oven to 400F

Steam broccoli for about 5 minutes until tender.

Whisk together garlic, eggs, milk, nutmeg, red pepper flakes, cheddar and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a large bowl until smooth.

Pour filling into pie shell and add broccoli and asparagus. Let set for ~5 minutes.

Bake quiche until custard is just set, 45 to 50 minutes. (Center will tremble slightly; filling will continue to set as it cools.) Cool at least 20 minutes.

Serve quiche warm or at room temperature.

MCBanjoMike
05-01-2010, 10:37 PM
In retrospect, I think that the problem was that I went climbing yesterday. That means that I spent 3 hours chalking my hands over and over again, which probably created a network of fissures for the jalapeno oil to work its way into my skin. It burned like a son of a bitch for almost three hours before finally calming down. Apparently, the secret is to wash your hands with milk or cooking oil, since these can actually dissolve the capsaicin - although in my case, it was a bit too late by the time I got around to doing so (I used milk). Another time, I might have had a lesser reaction. Either way, I won't be testing my theory - next time, I'll be wearing gloves while I handle the peppers!

And there will be a next time, by the way, that shakshuka recipe is amazing.

Marfy
05-02-2010, 03:59 AM
One time, I handled one, teeny, tiny mild green chile without gloves. Six hours later I ended up falling asleep with my hand in a bowl of vinegar, lemon juice and rice milk. It still hurt a little bet when I woke up the next day.

Yeah, I pretty much can't eat spicy food.

Luana
05-02-2010, 10:58 AM
SHAKSHUKA. (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/04/shakshuka/)

This is getting made very soon, oh yes.

My favorite ways of eating eggs:


deviled
in pancit palabok (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Pancit_palabok.jpg/800px-Pancit_palabok.jpg)
cracked into freshly made saimin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saimin)*


I used to love Eggs Benedict/Florentine, but I think I've lost my taste for hollandaise over the years (or just the places around here make terrible sauces -- it's completely possible).

* - I call all forms of store-bought ramen "saimin", but it works because I always end up adding stuff you'd find in actual saimin into it anyway.

Kirin
05-02-2010, 10:59 AM
Since this has turned into the "bad pepper stories" thread now - one time I was chopping a jalapeno and lightly brush my fingers under my nose.

Ow ow ow.

MCBanjoMike
05-08-2010, 07:12 PM
So I have an egg-related question for Talking Time: what should I do with 6 egg yolks? You see, after seeing that shakshuka recipe, I decided to poke around on the Smitten Kitchen and wound up finding this super tasty looking recipe (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/03/almond-macaroon-torte-with-chocolate-frosting/#more-5952). I'm currently putting it together (pray for me), and now that I have separated out the whites that I need for the layers, I'm left with all the yolks. I don't know what to do with them!

DO YOU?

SilentSnake
05-08-2010, 07:26 PM
I don't know what to do with them!

DO YOU?

Give them to the homeless?

mopinks
05-08-2010, 09:39 PM
last night I sauteed up some diced anaheim chiles, then just threw a couple of eggs on top of it. it was pretty astounding! it would've been perfect with some nice bread to sop it up, but I am trying to keep bread out of my life for the time being. bread is the enemy.

tonight I was making an omelet with bell peppers + spinach + a little smoked gruyere, but it kind of turned into scrambled eggs instead. which is still delicious!

I LOVE EGG

Kylie
05-08-2010, 09:49 PM
So I have an egg-related question for Talking Time: what should I do with 6 egg yolks? You see, after seeing that shakshuka recipe, I decided to poke around on the Smitten Kitchen and wound up finding this super tasty looking recipe (http://smittenkitchen.com/2010/03/almond-macaroon-torte-with-chocolate-frosting/#more-5952). I'm currently putting it together (pray for me), and now that I have separated out the whites that I need for the layers, I'm left with all the yolks. I don't know what to do with them!

DO YOU?

Make a custard -- creme brulee, quiche, hollandaise, etc all generally require again as many yolks as whites.

Alternately, put them in an ice cube tray and freeze them, to put in a custard later.

Grignr
05-09-2010, 09:22 AM
very high heat



incredibly low heat


SOMEONE IS LYING

I've tried this both ways, trying to get reliable scrambled eggs. For me, low heat reliably makes the eggs into a gross pudding mess. High heat makes happy fluffy eggs, except sometimes it makes tough overcooked puffs with gross juice secretions.

I feel like I'm closer to getting the high heat method to work. Is low heat supposed to turn out like a homogenous goopy blob?

Kylie
05-09-2010, 09:55 AM
Actually, yes. Low heat is supposed to make the eggs almost custard-like.

Kirin
05-09-2010, 05:34 PM
When I was little, my dad used to make me "egg toast", by frying himself some eggs and then breaking the yolks and letting them run over toast for me. So I guess that's something you could do with just yolks. But you'd have to figure out how to cook them to the heat/consistency of a fried egg somehow.

The custard/quiche/sauce idea is probably better.

Oh, speaking of both eggs and sauces, I had a delicious eggs benedict from Tyler's Taproom in Durham today. They make the hollandaise sauce with ale in.

NevznachaY
05-10-2010, 11:53 AM
So I have an egg-related question for Talking Time: what should I do with 6 egg yolks?

Ovos moles! Great stuff.

Or you can use them to make pasta carbonara.

Sven
05-10-2010, 12:08 PM
Make a custard -- creme brulee, quiche, hollandaise, etc all generally require again as many yolks as whites.

Alternately, put them in an ice cube tray and freeze them, to put in a custard later.

Yeah, a brulee's the best option. I eventually resorted to just buying cartoned egg whites, since I go through about three times as many of those as yolks.

Paul le Fou
05-11-2010, 06:27 AM
I tried the high heat-fast cook omelette thing and despite one mishap (getting a little too high with the heat such that putting the butter in meant it immediately burnt and smoked my kitchen out within seconds, and created an astonishingly foul smell to boot) they turned out all right! My problem, and this goes for any cooking, is that I always leave things cook for too long JUST IN CASE. I thought the omelette was still a little too runny on the inside, and then all of a sudden the outside had started getting a little brown.

Also, I don't know if I'm mixing/beating the eggs well enough since the whites seemed a little too separate at times - made it hard to judge when to flip/rotate.

Matchstick
05-11-2010, 02:49 PM
n.b.: If eggs look done in the pan, they're overcooked.

R^2
05-11-2010, 03:15 PM
Grignr, your scrambled eggs turn into little nodules of rubber floating in water because hey, you put to much heat on them and they overcooked. Low-heat eggs should have very small curds and a creamy texture.

I've seen classically-trained French chefs make scrambled eggs in a double-boiler. The heat should be that low.

Paul, if you put butter in your pan and it's started to smoke, congratulations! You've seasoned your pan. Take it off the heat, pour out the (browned) butter, and try again with another portion of fat in the pan. This actually makes your eggs (or whatever you're cooking in the pan, I did it today to sear veal shanks) less likely to stick.

Kirin, egg yolk is the best sauce, over toast or steak or nearly anything else. I'm in culinary school now and they haven't yet taught me to make a sauce that I like better than a slightly-done egg.

Sven
05-11-2010, 03:21 PM
Kirin, egg yolk is the best sauce, over toast or steak or nearly anything else. I'm in culinary school now and they haven't yet taught me to make a sauce that I like better than a slightly-done egg.

I raved about Milestone's prime rib hash a couple weeks ago, and it was made - MADE - by the poached eggs mixing in with everything else.

Although personally I prefer bernaise.

mopinks
05-11-2010, 03:35 PM
as much as I usually enjoy omelets, I always feel like it's a terrible sin to eat eggs and not have delicious amazing yolk running out all over everything.

runny yolk is liquid gold.

Kylie
05-11-2010, 06:06 PM
Plenty of green salads -- and almost ANYTHING with a vinaigrette -- are improved by the addition of poached eggs -- and specifically, their yolks. It's a positively amazing way to do steak and eggs.

Eggs, and anything else, keep cooking after you take them out -- if your "just in case" is w/r/t salmonella, get pasteurized eggs, and never worry again. If your "just in case" means you don't like it underdone, experiment with pulling them earlier - you'll be surprised.

Matchstick
05-11-2010, 07:29 PM
Although personally I prefer bernaise.

Precisely. Bernaise is my favorite sauce of all.

R^2
05-12-2010, 12:55 PM
Made a buerre blanc today. Still not as good as egg yolk.