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R^2
06-02-2010, 11:25 AM
Okay. A friend (clearly one who has no fear of pancreatic shock, as we'll see shortly) pointed this out to me last night, and I in turn point it out to you:

If you dip an Oreo in milk, the wafers absorb the milk and it gets soggy within seconds.

If you dip an Oreo in chocolate milk, the wafers don't absorb the milk as well, and the cookie keeps a little bit of its crunch.

This bore experimentation! So I dipped an Oreo in regular milk and chocolate milk, side-by-side, for fifteen seconds each. The regular-milk Oreo had no crunch left; it was held together by the creme filling. The chocolate Oreo was still substantially crunchy.

Maybe, says I, it's the sugar added to the milk. Somehow. So I added some plain crystalline white sugar to the glass of regular milk and dipped again. No crunch.

So, Talking Timers, foodies, and burgeoning chemists, what is it about chocolate syrup that prevents milk from moistening an Oreo cookie?

Balrog
06-02-2010, 11:40 AM
You know how like heat transfers from the hottest thing to the coldest thing. Maybe chocolate works the same way or the opposite or damn, I don't know what I'm talking about.

pence
06-02-2010, 11:46 AM
You know how like heat transfers from the hottest thing to the coldest thing. Maybe chocolate works the same way or the opposite or damn, I don't know what I'm talking about.

Are you saying that the milk-cookie system naturally seeks chocolate equilibrium? That would mean regular milk is, essentially, robbing the cookie of chocolate!

Reinforcements
06-02-2010, 11:49 AM
Maybe, says I, it's the sugar added to the milk. Somehow. So I added some plain crystalline white sugar to the glass of regular milk and dipped again. No crunch.
Sugar won't dissolve in cold liquids anyway, so this wouldn't work. If you want to isolate whether it's the sugar or the chocolate, you should get some corn syrup or make some simple syrup by boiling 1 part water with 2 parts sugar.*

*Hey, kids, making your own chocolate syrup is fun AND easy! Boil 1.5 cups water with 3 cups sugar in a heavy pot, then add 1.5 cups cocoa powder, 2 tbsp light corn syrup, 1 tbsp vanilla extract, and .25 tsp salt and stir until smooth! Reduce syrup to your liking (it will be thicker when cool), allow to cool, and store in a squeeze bottle (use a funnel)! Mmmmm!

Parish
06-02-2010, 12:05 PM
You guys didn't take Culinary Physics, huh? This is basic stuff, the widely-known Law of Conservation of Chocoliciousness. It's an aspect of entropy which dictates that the introduction of chocolate causes any system to advance to its maximum state of deliciousness.

dwolfe
06-02-2010, 03:56 PM
carrageenen (http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-carrageenan.htm) and milk fat.

Carrageenen is a gelatin/agar-like thickening agent found in store-bought chocolate milk (not so much in dry chocolate milk powder). It's also why there's such a film in the glass with choco milk vs regular of the same fat content.

Parish
06-02-2010, 04:07 PM
Please stop obscuring the true facts with your so-called science.

Paul le Fou
06-03-2010, 07:05 AM
Isn't the whole point that the cookies absorb the milk? Is there any actual milk in the cookies or is it just a wet cookie?

I wonder if it works with soymilk

boot101
06-03-2010, 07:55 AM
Fucking scientists are pissing me off!

R^2
06-03-2010, 09:51 AM
You guys didn't take Culinary Physics, huh? This is basic stuff, the widely-known Law of Conservation of Chocoliciousness. It's an aspect of entropy which dictates that the introduction of chocolate causes any system to advance to its maximum state of deliciousness.

I haven't taken Culinary Physics yet! I just started school a few months ago! We're still covering bullshit made-up non-science like the Mailliard reaction and stuff.

Anyway, I can't find the image itself, but just pretend I posted an image here of Tomo from Azumanga Daioh saying "Oh. Well, I'm convinced."

Sven
06-03-2010, 03:38 PM
You guys didn't take Culinary Physics, huh? This is basic stuff, the widely-known Law of Conservation of Chocoliciousness. It's an aspect of entropy which dictates that the introduction of chocolate causes any system to advance to its maximum state of deliciousness.

Alton Brown teaches a very good correspondence course.

Calorie Mate
06-03-2010, 04:02 PM
carrageenen (http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-carrageenan.htm) and milk fat.

Carrageenen is a gelatin/agar-like thickening agent found in store-bought chocolate milk (not so much in dry chocolate milk powder). It's also why there's such a film in the glass with choco milk vs regular of the same fat content.

But what about chocolate milk made by chocolate syrup + regular milk?

Dawnswalker
06-04-2010, 06:11 PM
What about hot chocolate?

mablem8
06-05-2010, 08:57 AM
I don't have the materials to test any of my theories, so I've been refraining from throwing them out there, but this morning I hit on one that made a bit more sense than the others.

I'm not sure if I would attribute it to viscosity or density, but chocolate milk is a lot more thick than regular milk. It sticks together more. Ergo, it seems that the liquid would be less willing to let go of itself and soak into a cookie.

I'd test this by using skim milk, 2%, and whole milk, along with chocolate milk. Most chocolate milk has a whole milk base, but I've seen some that are based from skim. That would be a factor to watch out for too.

An easier way to see how the "thickness" of the liquid affects the ability to soak into an oreo would be to take things to the extreme: compare water with honey, for example.

StrawberryChrist
06-09-2010, 01:08 PM
You guys didn't take Culinary Physics, huh? This is basic stuff, the widely-known Law of Conservation of Chocoliciousness. It's an aspect of entropy which dictates that the introduction of chocolate causes any system to advance to its maximum state of deliciousness.

It follows that the universe approaches a state of Absolute deliciousness through total chocolate saturation. Scientists have dubbed this cataclysmic scenario: The Chocopocalypse.

Nodal
06-09-2010, 01:10 PM
What about hot chocolate?

CSI: Talking Time

Sven
06-09-2010, 01:16 PM
If I was a kid, this would've made a kick-ass science project (I actually won in Grade 5 for trying to find out which type of kool-aid bent light more, which was like some demented combination of Hawking and Iron Chef).

In lieu of that, someone call Jamie and Adam and let's get the Mythbusters on this.