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nunix
06-03-2010, 04:52 PM
Cheese is a best thing.

A best thing.

Talking Time, what are your favourite cheeses? Is it cheddar? Mild or sharp? How about brie? Cow or goat or other? Celtic or Arabian? What cheeses do you crave above others, and which would you recommend to friends and family for occasions serious and gay?

Tell us your cheeses!

cortbassist89
06-03-2010, 04:53 PM
Sharp cheddar forever.

But I will be following this thread so I know what cheeses to buy and try tomorrow.

Sven
06-03-2010, 04:53 PM
I like most Blue Cheeses, like very old, very strong cheddars, and a good parm is a heavenly thing.

Can't stand brie, though. I still haven't found one that actually tastes good.

Best cheese story: a friend of mine who lives in Rosedale (one of the most exclusive enclaves in Toronto) once bought a cheese from his neighbourood deli so stinky that his neighbours called the cops on him, thinking he had a dead body or animal in the backyard.

StriderDL
06-03-2010, 05:04 PM
Aged Gouda.
Manchego.
Any tangy goat variety.

Falselogic
06-03-2010, 05:10 PM
Gruyre (young or old), Muenster, American Swisses, Medium Cheddars, White Cheddar, Fontina, Gorgonzola, Fresh Mozzarella, Ricottas, Burrata.

Man cheese is awesome!

Dizzy
06-03-2010, 05:16 PM
The Stinky Cheese Man (http://www.adoptionblogs.com/media/ParentingSpecialKids/thumb_stinky%20cheese%20man.gif)

http://www.adoptionblogs.com/media/ParentingSpecialKids/thumb_stinky%20cheese%20man.gif

Sheana
06-03-2010, 05:25 PM
I like many cheeses, but am fondest of mozzerella and colby jack. A little muenster and so on now and again.

Brer
06-03-2010, 05:31 PM
There are so many good ones it's impossible to pick a favorite, but here are a few perennials that I enjoy both straight and in various dishes.

Sharp, strong cheddars, the stronger the better.

Stilton. I like most blues, but Stilton is my all-time favorite.

Manchego (I used to have a very nice recipe for manchego biscuits, but they were a bit tricky to make).

Mozzarella

Double Gloucester

Come to think of it, if I could have only one cheese on the list, I'd cheat, and say Huntsman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntsman_cheese).

Edit: Also, I'm counting the posts between the OP and a mention of a certain cheese. Hopefully I'm wrong.

Edit 2: Whoa, America isn't even in the top 10 of "annual per capita cheese consumption"? I did not expect that.

Lumber Baron
06-03-2010, 05:50 PM
Everybody here needs their mind blown by eating Halloumi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloumi), the Cypriot cheese that you grill. You will never know how you lived without it.

Brer
06-03-2010, 05:53 PM
Everybody here needs their mind blown by eating Halloumi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloumi), the Cypriot cheese that you grill. You will never know how you lived without it.

Mmmm, nifty. I wish I wasn't such a drive from the cheese importer in Longmont, CO that has the best inventory I've ever seen. I suspect that's the only place around here I could find it.

Octopus Prime
06-03-2010, 06:27 PM
Swiss is, I believe, the only cheese I have loved. And I don't mean "love" in the platonic "Hey, I enjoy this thing" sense.

No... oh no.

I have a deep, spiritual connection with that cheese.

cortbassist89
06-03-2010, 06:28 PM
I'm pretty glad you added that last sentence.

Ethan
06-03-2010, 06:44 PM
Pecorino romano. Manchego. Gruyere. Aged Vermont cheddar. White stilton. Gorgonzola. Parmigiano. Fresh mozzarella. Smoked gouda.

Of course, it's possible to ruin all these cheeses if you don't make them with love.

shivam
06-03-2010, 07:42 PM
I'm such a junkie for real cheese, like local sheeps milk cheeses, or triple cream bries, or fresh goat feta.


man, i have so much info i'm going to share in this thread.

Violentvixen
06-03-2010, 08:19 PM
Mmmm, nifty. I wish I wasn't such a drive from the cheese importer in Longmont, CO that has the best inventory I've ever seen. I suspect that's the only place around here I could find it.

The Wild Oats there carried it, but I don't even know if that store is there anymore.

Also, tons of people told me about that store and I never got down there. I kind of regret it but since I didn't have much money to spare it's probably for the best.

mopinks
06-03-2010, 08:26 PM
ROGUE CREAMERY (http://www.roguecreamery.com/) has the best blue cheese I have ever eaten. it was nuts, man.

I bought a chocolate truffle with some of their smoked blue cheese in it. you don't even know!!

Falselogic
06-03-2010, 08:29 PM
Smoked gouda..

How could I forget delicious smoked gouda?!

Daikaiju
06-03-2010, 09:06 PM
I'm going to let Pinky (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufJTqT5gMg0) give my answer.

Ethan
06-03-2010, 09:34 PM
Incidentally, I went to Holland a couple years ago and was corrected in my cheese pronunciation. The cheese I pronounce(d) "GOO-da" is actually pronounced more like "HOW-da," with a guttural "H" sound as in German or Yiddish.

Brer
06-03-2010, 10:16 PM
Just to keep the discussion going: How about cheeses you've never tried, but would like to?

For my part:

Adrahan
Appenzeller
Mascarpone (I've only ever had it -in- things. I want to try it straight.)
Red Leicester
Red Windsor
Sakura Cheese
Wensleydale

Ethan
06-03-2010, 10:18 PM
I want to try a real, fresh ricotta from (or, even better, in) Italy.

shivam
06-03-2010, 10:21 PM
fresh ricotta in italy is the best. only surpassed by fresh mozzarella the day it was made.

mopinks
06-03-2010, 10:23 PM
Mascarpone (I've only ever had it -in- things. I want to try it straight.)

spreading a little mascarpone on a shortbread cookie is pretty much amazing.

Comb Stranger
06-03-2010, 10:40 PM
oh my god i must try halloumi you guys i must

Paul le Fou
06-04-2010, 03:00 AM
I like so many cheeses for so many different things that I can't just PICK one. Goat cheeses, smoked gouda, cheddar, mozzarella, bleu.

I have sadly limited experience with particularly exotic kinds of cheese, something I hope to rectify someday.

Also it's been so long since cheese has been part of my diet and it makes me incredibly sad. It can be pretty hard to find much/good cheese in Japan.

Olli T
06-04-2010, 03:13 AM
I love cheese way too much, and that's why I've basically had to give up buying any. I bought some smoked cream cheese for a picnic tomorrow and I straight up ate almost half of it yesterday.

Paul le Fou
06-04-2010, 03:40 AM
Ooh, I just remembered Havarti with dill.

MCBanjoMike
06-04-2010, 06:25 AM
Currently, my favorite cheeses are Migneron de Charlevoix and St-Andr. Oh man, they are so good.

Pseudonym
06-04-2010, 08:26 AM
Goat cheese! But I'm also very fond of Gouda. (Man there's this Gouda with walnuts in it that I've picked up at Trader Joe's a few times that I could totally eat all day.) I also like those tiny little Baybel cheeses in the wax coating, but I think the tiny food novelty factor is in play there.

You know what is the best thing though? Cheese board! Lay out a variety of cheese samples with little tidbits of bread, fruit, jams, nuts and the like and then mix and match the flavor combos. It really is the best thing! My Sunday night gaming group has a bit of a cheese board obsession to the point where we were eating a cheese board while we played our characters eating a cheese board in a pub.

Comb Stranger
06-04-2010, 08:29 AM
Relevent. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufJTqT5gMg0)

nunix
06-04-2010, 07:17 PM
I've become really fond of a brand called Dubliner. Very sharp white cheese, fairly hard, and a strong taste. A little bit goes a long way, which is fine, since it comes in tiny bricks and is expensive.

Also, a fun thing: buy a bag of shredded cheese (or shred your own), dump it into a bowl, mix in whatever herbs and spices you like, then re-bag it. Great for home-made pizza or bagels or breads or whatever. Tend to use a basil/oregano/thyme mix with mine.

Matchstick
06-04-2010, 07:25 PM
I've become really fond of a brand called Dubliner. Very sharp white cheese, fairly hard, and a strong taste. A little bit goes a long way, which is fine, since it comes in tiny bricks and is expensive.

Dubliner is very nice. I like all kinds of cheeses, but mainly I don't like an overly soft cheese.

Daikaiju
06-04-2010, 07:48 PM
Relevent. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufJTqT5gMg0)

Redundant. (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?p=775518#post775518)

shivam
06-05-2010, 01:03 AM
man, this makes me want to have a wine and cheese party, just to introduce people to fun things.

Pseudonym
06-05-2010, 03:26 PM
The last time I went to visit my friends in Wisconsin they took me to a really fancy cheese shop. The cheese was pretty expensive, but there was a basket of "cheese orphans" (The leftover bits of cheese wheels too small to sell as a proper portion.) by the register. So I went home with around 10 dollars worth of foundling cheese in my carry on and my family had a lovely little cheese board when I got home. It really was a great way to sample a lot of types of cheese. I had a super moldy one that was pretty good, and a few types of super aged cheddar that were also nice. But really the best was the Drunken Goat. It was milder and more firm that I would expect a goat cheese to be but it had this great aftertaste.

On a previous trip up there I fell in love with this "bread cheese" I got at the farmer's market. The cheese looks like it is toasted on the outside and you throw it in a skillet and fry it up. It actually doesn't get very melty, just soft and even more toasted on the outside. And it tastes pretty good with maple syrup.

Ethan
06-05-2010, 03:50 PM
man, this makes me want to have a wine and cheese party, just to introduce people to fun things.

Wait until late August to do this.

Luana
06-09-2010, 09:28 PM
My twenty-five pound weight gain was helped along by America's Next Top Model/Top Chef nights which were supplemented by fancy cheese runs. I'm a sucker for Delice de Bourgogne and my bargain alternative, Cambozola. For a hard cheese, I love Beecher's. Top Food and Drug sells fancy cheeses in very small, bite-sized chunks, so I have to stay very far away from there.

I lost almost forty pounds after cutting out cheese. I'm thinking about going a bit below my target goal so I can gain toward said target on cheese alone. God, I miss you, cheese.

StrawberryChrist
06-09-2010, 10:35 PM
Cheese is better than both salami and bologna combined. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3BYQDIvpOE)

Coinspinner
06-10-2010, 08:44 AM
A sandwich without cheese is... peanut-butter and jelly, usually.

Gouda is my favorite for eating solo.

Pajaro Pete
06-11-2010, 04:17 PM
I gotta hunt down some gruyre because there's about half a dozen recipes I've been wanting to try that call for it.

Titiboo
06-20-2010, 06:45 PM
I like Oaxaca cheese, which is really doughy cheese from Mexico. You pull off a piece sort of like you would from mozzarella and it tastes like dairy-heavy bread with a touch of salt. Mmm.
(I have a suspicion it might just be lumpy Mexican mozzarella, though)

Sir Sly Ry
06-20-2010, 07:08 PM
I'm pretty glad you added that last sentence.
Me too, because I wanted to be the only one who had an intensely sexual connection with it.

Sporophyte
07-07-2010, 04:38 PM
So having recently returned from Wisconsin I had a new quest: find a shop that sells quality cheeses. And boy did I ever. It was a little store on Ventura Blvd that seemed expensive and I was just going to look around and maybe buy something small. But then the man behind the counter started letting me taste the various and sundry cheeses they had to offer. As I failed will check after will check I found myself tasting cheese for over a half an hour and finally walked out the door with 4: A triple cream Bour, Hooks 10 year aged Cheddar, Beemster X-O, and Petit Basque.


I may never be able to eat supermarket cheeses again.

Paul le Fou
10-23-2012, 11:18 PM
There has been a breakthrough. I recently found out that our local grocery store in the boonies has started carrying feta AND goat cheese (and another Greek cheese of some sort... wiki suggests kefalotyri?

So I got some of the goat and feta (and will probably get some kefalatever when I'm through here). What should I do with them? Current plans are to crumble feta onto salad (naturally) and to make cheese omelettes.

Any other suggestions? (and who's had the kexolotl cheese before?)


EDIT: HOLY SHIT I'M GONNA GET THE KEFKA CHEESE AND MAKE MAKE SOME FUCKING SAGANAKI

Falselogic
10-23-2012, 11:22 PM
Why eat gross goat cheese? Now you can eat real cheese!

How?

SCIENCE (http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/10/02/genetically-engineered-cow-makes-hypoallergenic-milk/)

Paul le Fou
10-23-2012, 11:26 PM
gross goat cheese

what can happen in a man's life to make him so terribly, terribly wrong

there but for the grace of god go I...

(but that's cool what with the cows. I wonder if they can engineer some lactose-free milk while they're at it... that's way cooler than the simple chemical solution they have now!)

Alixsar
10-24-2012, 12:08 AM
Why eat gross goat cheese? Now you can eat real cheese!

How?

SCIENCE (http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/10/02/genetically-engineered-cow-makes-hypoallergenic-milk/)

I can't believe it. There's no whey they did that.

(but that's cool what with the cows. I wonder if they can engineer some lactose-free milk while they're at it... that's way cooler than the simple chemical solution they have now!)

It's not a chemical! They usually add lactase, the enzyme that is not present in people with lactose intolerance that digests lactose, that is typically cloned from bacterial cells. I mean, I guess lactase is an enzyme...and you could call an enzyme a chemical so...okay fine but it's not like they're adding hydrochloric acid or something. Calling it "chemical" sounds like they're adding poison into it.

Paul le Fou
10-24-2012, 03:28 AM
It's not a chemical! They usually add lactase, the enzyme that is not present in people with lactose intolerance that digests lactose, that is typically cloned from bacterial cells. I mean, I guess lactase is an enzyme...and you could call an enzyme a chemical so...okay fine but it's not like they're adding hydrochloric acid or something. Calling it "chemical" sounds like they're adding poison into it.

I actually did know this, and came to the bolded conclusion myself. I was posting and I was all like "the enzyme... adding... processing procedure... EHHH"

A while ago they used to sell it in bottles, so you could buy regular milk, put X drops in there (24 to a gallon, off the top of my head) and wait a day and boom, lactaid milk. I did a lot of milk-dropping until they canceled the product to just sell their milk direct. (They also had a 70% lactose free variety back in the day for reasons I cannot begin to fathom.)




Anyway, I totally put the feta on my salad and it was amazing. MORE CHEESE IDEAS

Kirin
10-24-2012, 11:36 AM
Man, I'll put goat cheese on just about anything. Pizza, omelette, salad, pasta, whatever. All good.
And yes, make some motherfucking Saganaki. You deserve it.

Droewyn
10-24-2012, 06:00 PM
Goat cheese makes for a mean cheeseburger.

There's an Italian chain restaurant that does a chicken dish I really like. Basically, grill a piece of chicken, bury it in a half inch of goat cheese, then drizzle with hollandaise sauce and top with sun dried tomatoes and basil.

Lady
10-24-2012, 10:39 PM
I wonder if I just found the name of the cheese I loved while studying abroad... SAPIN DU HAUT-DOUBS

Paul le Fou
05-26-2013, 06:26 AM
We had a cheese and wine party at my friend's house. She brought back a ton of cheeses from England, and needed some help eating them. Glad to be of service.

Gouda, cheddar, and muenster.
Cheshire, a soft white crumbly cheese
A soft white cheese with cranberries. So gooood
A soft white cheese with balsamic onions
A soft yellow cheese with brown ale and whole mustard seeds
A chipotle cheddar
A Shropshire blue

Man, there was more, but I can't remember. So much cheese. So delicious.

And, of course, branston pickle.

Droewyn
05-26-2013, 08:02 AM
We tried the cheese plate at our local Irish place the other night. Most of it was pretty standard stuff, but they had a very nice Guinness-soaked cheddar.

I also seem to be building a tolerance for bread and butter pickles, as I did not immediately spit it out and reach for a beverage as soon as my brain registered "sweet".

Teaspoon
05-26-2013, 09:11 AM
I like Stilton and Double Gloucester, but the local Farmer's market now has a booth for fresh and aged Asiago and it's hard to resist that stuff.

On alternative weeks I get some fromage blanc. It scrambles into egg something delicious.

taosterman
05-26-2013, 12:55 PM
Sorry to reach back over the new discussion and focus on an old one, but:

Why eat gross goat cheese?

This is nothing unusual to say to Falselogic, but: what the fuck is wrong with you

Falselogic
05-26-2013, 01:43 PM
Sorry to reach back over the new discussion and focus on an old one, but:



This is nothing unusual to say to Falselogic, but: what the fuck is wrong with you

Nothing. What's wrong with fucking goat cheese!? That shit has way too much funk! I don't want funk in my cheese! Only in my music!

taosterman
05-26-2013, 01:51 PM
Nothing. What's wrong with fucking goat cheese!? That shit has way too much funk! I don't want funk in my cheese! Only in my music!

NO YOU MUST HAVE MY OPINION

Or at least have some silky smooth sweet chevre!

Daikaiju
05-27-2013, 04:54 AM
DUDE. Cheese is, by it's very nature, funky. It's Milk that has learned to GITDOWN SON.

Beefy Hits
05-28-2013, 05:45 PM
I like to make a plate with extra sharp cheddar, swiss, and pepper jack with triscit crackers. My parents have a fancy cheese slicer that slices it really thin.

Teaspoon
05-28-2013, 08:24 PM
Somehow I was expecting that clip to lead to Venezuelan Beaver Cheese.

Ah well. How about this one? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7rzSslub6U)

Paul le Fou
04-23-2014, 12:22 AM
I picked up some Labne from the Halal store.

Then I put it inside dates.

It was fucking delicious, of course.

LOOK UPON ME, WISEST AMONG MEN

Red Hedgehog
04-23-2014, 10:50 AM
I picked up some Labne from the Halal store.

Then I put it inside dates.

It was fucking delicious, of course.

LOOK UPON ME, WISEST AMONG MEN

Weird, I always thought of labne as yogurt, but apparently it can also be more cheese-like depending on the culture.

themoreyouknow.jpg

Paul le Fou
04-23-2014, 05:33 PM
Weird, I always thought of labne as yogurt, but apparently it can also be more cheese-like depending on the culture.

themoreyouknow.jpg

My searching has turned up something along the lines of "strained yogurt that turns it into a cream cheese." I've been eating it more like cream cheese than yogurt, myself. It's one of those blurred lines I guess. "solid milk"

I don't even care 'cause it's super delicious.

LBD_Nytetrayn
04-24-2014, 02:52 AM
I'd kill to find out where to get some Muenster cheese in Toronto.

mopinks
04-24-2014, 07:58 AM
see if you can find some Port Salut

it's like fancy Muenster

LBD_Nytetrayn
04-24-2014, 11:24 PM
Noted, thanks.

Serephine
04-28-2014, 04:23 PM
Noted, thanks.

Issun
05-23-2014, 06:48 PM
I want to cook something with Cotswald but the problem is the thing I want to use it for is everything.

Izzybelle
05-24-2014, 01:16 PM
see if you can find some Port Salut

it's like fancy Muenster

does it melt the same as muenster? b/c if it does i have to try this. normally for grilled cheese i stick w/cheddar and use muenster if i'm feeling fancy. i wonder how fancy fancy muenster might taste in a grilled cheese.

Paul le Fou
07-10-2015, 09:26 PM
Havarti actually smells like the stuff in the corner of your toenails

Beefy Hits
07-19-2015, 02:40 AM
Extra Sharp Cheddar please.

Kylie
07-28-2015, 11:42 AM
Halloumi forever.

Haters to the left.

upupdowndown
07-28-2015, 12:23 PM
Halloumi forever.

Haters to the left.

I really dig halloumi. there's a local place that does a double-grilled cheese sandwich: they grill halloumi, then put it with avocado, shaved beets, arugula, and garlic aioli on salted rye, then grill the whole thing. it's just as awesome as it sounds.

but as much as I dig halloumi, I like bread cheese just a little bit more - halloumi is saltier than bread cheese, so I find the bread cheese to be a little more versatile.

Daikaiju
07-28-2015, 12:53 PM
I bought some Moon Cheese (http://mooncheesesnacks.com/). It is damn delicious.

Red Hedgehog
07-28-2015, 01:46 PM
I really dig halloumi. there's a local place that does a double-grilled cheese sandwich: they grill halloumi, then put it with avocado, shaved beets, arugula, and garlic aioli on salted rye, then grill the whole thing. it's just as awesome as it sounds.

but as much as I dig halloumi, I like bread cheese just a little bit more - halloumi is saltier than bread cheese, so I find the bread cheese to be a little more versatile.

Yeah, I love haloumi, but I could only eat it occasionally, not every day.

LBD_Nytetrayn
08-03-2015, 03:26 AM
When I was younger and worked at a deli in a grocery store, there was this really good Swiss cheese called "Alpine Lace."

Not sure if they still make it, or where I could even find it around here (our store had it once, albeit briefly). Really good stuff. Less hard and stiff; softer and more flavorful.

Miss that stuff.

MagFlare
08-10-2015, 04:55 AM
When I was younger and worked at a deli in a grocery store, there was this really good Swiss cheese called "Alpine Lace."

Not sure if they still make it, or where I could even find it around here (our store had it once, albeit briefly). Really good stuff. Less hard and stiff; softer and more flavorful.

Miss that stuff.

I work in a deli, and we've got it.

LBD_Nytetrayn
08-10-2015, 06:19 AM
I work in a deli, and we've got it.

Makes sense; I was in NC at the time. ;)

madhair60
08-10-2015, 06:20 AM
Wait what? Do people exist who don't like halloumi? Bring them to me for killing.

I made mushrooms stuffed with stilton. Yummers, is what a teenage girl might say.

Daikaiju
12-30-2015, 05:22 PM
Behold, the power of Cheese (http://magazine.good.is/articles/france-power-plant-cheese-beaufort).

LBD_Nytetrayn
12-31-2015, 11:35 AM
PhooxCCZz7s

lQkR1T_B7FA

Beefy Hits
12-31-2015, 11:36 PM
Extra sharp cheddar

MooMoo
01-07-2016, 02:56 PM
What's a good thing to do with shitty cheese you wouldn't eat straight or on a sandwich?

Falselogic
01-07-2016, 03:18 PM
What's a good thing to do with shitty cheese you wouldn't eat straight or on a sandwich?

Throw away.

Bge
01-07-2016, 03:26 PM
Throw into a machine to recharge a magic wand.

Patrick
01-07-2016, 03:31 PM
Nachos are basically the lowest level cheese repository.

MooMoo
01-07-2016, 03:32 PM
Nachos are basically the lowest level cheese repository.

Good shout!

Daikaiju
01-07-2016, 08:53 PM
Weird isn't it? A mid tier food devolved into lower form. Usually goes the other way.

Vaeran
01-08-2016, 08:55 AM
A grilled cheese sandwich can elevate sub-optimal cheese.

Paul le Fou
01-09-2016, 01:48 AM
I had some illegal french cheese. It was pretty good

Daikaiju
01-09-2016, 10:15 AM
illegal?

MooMoo
01-09-2016, 11:30 AM
Sexy.

Falselogic
01-09-2016, 11:47 AM
illegal?

The FDA has banned a number of cheeses (http://www.medicaldaily.com/fda-bans-roquefort-other-french-cheeses-due-bacteria-levels-though-theyre-virtually-301638)

MooMoo
01-09-2016, 12:10 PM
Ok so I'm not saying go and commit a crime but looking at that list y'all need to go commit some sexy cheese crimes.

Gaer
01-09-2016, 12:42 PM
pfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff


christ, these people also don't even let you guys have cheese made from raw milk.


pfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff


land of the freeeeeeeeeeeeeee

LBD_Nytetrayn
01-09-2016, 01:53 PM
What's a good thing to do with shitty cheese you wouldn't eat straight or on a sandwich?

What kind of cheese?

I'd recommend looking at pizza. Worst case scenario for a lot of pizzas, the other ingredients drown it out and it's mostly a sort of unifying element.

MooMoo
01-09-2016, 02:01 PM
My mate got bought a collection of shit cheese, so stuff like cheddar, red leicester, etc. He was wondering what to do with it, since binning it seems a waste.

Paul le Fou
01-09-2016, 02:16 PM
My mate got bought a collection of shit cheese, so stuff like cheddar, red leicester, etc. He was wondering what to do with it, since binning it seems a waste.

I know for a fact that cheddar makes a perfectly nice "melt on chips for cheap-ass nachos" cheese. Get a can of beans or some avocado or tomatoes or something and go nuts. Or put it on a sandwich. Or grilled cheese!

Look I know cheddar is plain and boring among cheeses but it's still tasty in its own right :c

MooMoo
01-09-2016, 02:17 PM
No no, it's not that it's shit cos it's cheddar, it's just a shit cheddar.

Paul le Fou
01-09-2016, 03:56 PM
oh boo.

Well, melting is still the best way to make a shit cheese better.

Bge
01-09-2016, 05:03 PM
You live in Britain. Put it in a pie.

Torzelbaum
01-09-2016, 07:44 PM
Or a pudding.

Daikaiju
01-10-2016, 09:28 AM
The FDA's logic continues to mystify me.

MagFlare
01-11-2016, 06:14 PM
Take that garbage cheese and melt it in a pot over super-low heat with some lemon juice, corn starch, and beer. Then dip bread and cauliflower in it.

MooMoo
01-11-2016, 06:35 PM
What's the UK version of corn starch? Cornflour? Also can I do this in a saucepan? I think my friend has used their cheese but I need to try this.

MagFlare
01-11-2016, 06:49 PM
What's the UK version of corn starch? Cornflour? Also can I do this in a saucepan? I think my friend has used their cheese but I need to try this.

Cornflour is exactly the same thing, yeah. And don't think you can do without it! The last time I did a fondue I was like "eh, I bet I don't actually need these emulsifying agents" and it turns out I was goddamned wrong. It was like eating a combination of a delicious fondue and a fucking sandbox. And I bet a saucepan would work fine. Just make sure to be patient.

Edit: Apparently the official word is that a double-boiler is the best thing because it provides indirect heat, but a heavy-bottomed saucepan works too.

muteKi
01-12-2016, 02:25 PM
pfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff


christ, these people also don't even let you guys have cheese made from raw milk.


pfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff


land of the freeeeeeeeeeeeeee

ron paul 2016

no seriously a big part of his platform was to let people drink raw milk

i mean he never bothered to do enough of his job to enact any component of his platform

but raw milk was a big deal for good ol' grandpa liberty

Gaer
01-14-2016, 12:20 AM
ron paul 2016

no seriously a big part of his platform was to let people drink raw milk

i mean he never bothered to do enough of his job to enact any component of his platform

but raw milk was a big deal for good ol' grandpa liberty

Serious talk: drinking raw milk is a bad idea, unless it's your cow/goat/sheep/yak or your friend's cow/goat/sheep/yak. If you don't know where that animal has been, and how that raw milk was stored, it isn't the best idea.

Making cheese from raw milk is safe, as the process that creates cheese kills the bad-guy bacteria.

I mean, if you're pregnant or nursing, best to avoid all raw milk and product just in case (especially soft cheeses like brie). But you're supposed to avoid anything "off" (including rare red meat!) in that situation.

Kylie
01-14-2016, 09:17 AM
Around where I used to live, there were several Amish/Mennonite raw-milk smuggling rings.

You could get it in neighboring states as "animal food" or if you personally owned shares of a cow, also.

Basically it took a lot of work to feed your kids something that'll probably hurt them.

Raw Milk Cheese, though, gosh I want it.

Positronic Brain
01-14-2016, 12:11 PM
True confession: I lived the days before pasteurization.

I was born in the south of Mexico, in what was basically a rural city at the time. Until I was, dunno 8, the only way you could get milk was raw. Trucks would go around on the streets with these huge metal containers selling milk door to door, which you would then have to boil for a while before you could drink it. The cream that geled at the top was the prime ingredient for, oh, so many desserts.

Eventually we got a decent highway to the rest of the civilization and milk in a carton stopped being a rarity. Now you can still find raw milk at the market, but you have to look for it.

All this to say that, yes, raw milk is tasty, but as somebody who grew up on the stuff, it is not tasty enough to risk your health over it.

Kylie
01-14-2016, 02:38 PM
Raw Milk Cheese is way safer than raw milk, though.

Raw milk is hazardous. Raw milk cheese is v. safe.

Dadgum Roi
01-14-2016, 02:40 PM
Around where I used to live, there were several Amish/Mennonite raw-milk smuggling rings.


Under the control of Joaqun "El Queso" Guzmn.

taosterman
01-14-2016, 03:47 PM
I haven't tried this, but one loophole that a local farm here offers is to "lease" you one of their cows, and any raw milk that you purchase from the farm is effectively you "milking" your cow (regardless of whether someone else does it for you).

I'm not interested in drinking raw milk, but based on the times I've made cheese using even lightly pasteurized milk, it's really difficult to produce curds of any reasonable size without it.

Gaer
01-14-2016, 05:45 PM
Raw Milk Cheese is way safer than raw milk, though.

Raw milk is hazardous. Raw milk cheese is v. safe.

Yes, exactly this. I would never drink raw milk I wasn't 100% absolutely positive of and then some.

Raw milk cheese though, is safe enough to buy at farmer's markets and the like, and is even sold in grocery shops here without any issues.

I haven't tried this, but one loophole that a local farm here offers is to "lease" you one of their cows, and any raw milk that you purchase from the farm is effectively you "milking" your cow (regardless of whether someone else does it for you).

This is so goddamned skeevy. Puts my back up whenever I hear about it...

I'm not interested in drinking raw milk, but based on the times I've made cheese using even lightly pasteurized milk, it's really difficult to produce curds of any reasonable size without it.

Yeah, I can understand this sentiment though. Cheesemaking is apparently really neat. I've never tried it myself because I cannot prepare food for the life of me...

Hazama Kuro
01-14-2016, 08:35 PM
Not directly related to cheese, but does boiling milk make it unraw...? Or is that just reserved for pasteurizing and homogenizing? 'Cause we get water buffalo milk from this one guy and just boil, cool and drink it, and it and its cream are just so rich and delicious...

Gaer
01-14-2016, 10:41 PM
Not directly related to cheese, but does boiling milk make it unraw...? Or is that just reserved for pasteurizing and homogenizing? 'Cause we get water buffalo milk from this one guy and just boil, cool and drink it, and it and its cream are just so rich and delicious...

Boiling == pasteurisation. Louis Pasteur just made it easier to do, and prevent the boiled milk taste.... because it doesn't need to boil. Technically you only need to get milk to 72C to kill any possible milkborne pathogens.

So boiling changes the taste (since caramelisation occurs too then!) and nukes bacteria from orbit.

Just to be sure.

Torzelbaum
01-15-2016, 02:18 AM
Boiling == pasteurisation. Louis Pasteur just made it easier to do, and prevent the boiled milk taste.... because it doesn't need to boil. Technically you only need to get milk to 72C to kill any possible milkborne pathogens.Actually, it depends on which pasteurization method (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteurization#Process) is used.

taosterman
01-15-2016, 08:31 AM
I've done a little extra research, and it turns out that most cheese isn't raw milk cheese, which was my original assumption. Makes sense, since the cheesemaking process doesn't raise the temperature to pasteurization levels. I guess I just need more practice with milk from the store, and a giant cave of some sort.

Kylie
01-15-2016, 10:09 AM
Actually, it depends on which pasteurization method (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteurization#Process) is used.

As with most cooking methods, speed and temperature determine taste. Cooking something at 284F is very different from cooking something at 145F.

Raw milk is usually prized for soft cheeses - not big-curd stuff necessarily, for which you need rennets and all - but for stuff that is really heat and time sensitive, especially double and triple creams and some bleus. Those go through less chemical processing, so the flavor of the resulting cheese is heavily dependent upon the flavor of the dairy used. And as above, the rougher you've treated your dairy, the less flavor it will have.

On the other hand, if you want to make a medium to hard cheese, way more of the flavor will arise out of the method and bacteria and setting and air and resting temperature and flavorants than from dairy quality.

Hazama Kuro
01-15-2016, 12:10 PM
Boiling == pasteurisation. Louis Pasteur just made it easier to do, and prevent the boiled milk taste.... because it doesn't need to boil. Technically you only need to get milk to 72C to kill any possible milkborne pathogens.

So boiling changes the taste (since caramelisation occurs too then!) and nukes bacteria from orbit.

Just to be sure.

Dang, pasteurisation is a lot simpler than I thought. I knew it had to do with heating stuff, but not that...that's pretty much all.

That was more informative than I had hoped. Thank you very much. Now I can enjoy the water buffalo milk with negative worries.

JBear
01-15-2016, 12:36 PM
Dang, pasteurisation is a lot simpler than I thought.
Only tangentially related, but did anyone else have and love this book as a kid?

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51D8NEQ1E0L._SX361_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

IIRC, the main story was about the rabies vaccine, but I recall learning about pasteurisation from this, so either it's described in the supplemental material at the back, or I had a such a burning desire for more Louis Pasteur that I checked out further material from the library.

Falselogic
01-15-2016, 12:45 PM
Only tangentially related, but did anyone else have and love this book as a kid?

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51D8NEQ1E0L._SX361_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

IIRC, the main story was about the rabies vaccine, but I recall learning about pasteurisation from this, so either it's described in the supplemental material at the back, or I had a such a burning desire for more Louis Pasteur that I checked out further material from the library.

We had all of them growing up! Or at least a lot of them!

Bge
01-15-2016, 01:04 PM
Hey, I first learned about Pasteur from that book too! I can't remember how many of them we had, but I know we also had the Terry Fox book.

Falselogic
01-15-2016, 01:09 PM
Hey, I first learned about Pasteur from that book too! I can't remember how many of them we had, but I know we also had the Terry Fox book.

I seem to remember the Helen Keller one the most.

Mara
01-15-2016, 01:37 PM
I LOVED those books! Oh man, now I'm nostalgic.

MCBanjoMike
01-15-2016, 01:38 PM
We have a big stack of Value Tales books at my parents' cottage. I'm planning on retiring off them.

(Who am I kidding, I could never sell them.)

Yimothy
01-16-2016, 12:25 AM
The years have fallen away and I can see tiny soldiers marching through a syringe again. That's that book, right?

MooMoo
06-16-2017, 02:57 AM
I got bought some brie. Now what?

R^2
06-16-2017, 07:55 AM
The classic: Sheet pan, parchment, brie, honey drizzle. Bake at 350F for a few minutes, around 7, until it starts to ooze. Eat on crackers with tart apples and nuts.

Also makes a good ham sandwich.

MooMoo
06-16-2017, 08:34 AM
Hmm, it's a wedge so it'd probably squidge everywhere, but that's probably not going to stop me trying that anyway tbh.

R^2
06-16-2017, 11:48 AM
That's what the parchment paper is for. Don't leave that tastiness on the pan -- and besides, when it squidges a little is when you know it's ready.

Bge
06-16-2017, 03:44 PM
My sister used to just microwave brie and eat it with a spoon.

MooMoo
06-16-2017, 03:53 PM
My sister used to just microwave brie and eat it with a spoon.

I like how your sister thinks.