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Brickroad
01-31-2011, 04:45 AM
We've been playing a game of Vampire: Dark Ages on and off for a couple years. It's a Tremere game, but not all the PCs are vampires yet. The main storyline has revolved around the capture and subsequent management of a stronghold in southern England sometime in the late tenth century which is situated on an ancient wellspring of magic power.

Right now I'm the vampire in charge of running the joint, and the other vampire is my second-in-command. There are three mortal PCs in various positons around the keep, and one former vampire who was killed by a werewolf and became a wraith.

For a long time things ran pretty smoothly, with good amounts of cooperation from all the PCs. Well, last week our GM had had just about enough of that, and concocted a clever way to turn us all against each other.

One thing led to another, and we found ourselves caught up in a conspiracy to kill the vampiric prince. While he slept, our men overwhelmed his. We killed his bodyguard (a former Roman centurion) and faced off against the master himself... who turned the tables by enslaving me and the other vampire character.

In her last moment of lucidity, my friend ordered the rest of the group to kill the prince, even if it meant killing both of us, too.

Of course, we're both fucking vampires so that was easier said than done. The next day was a carnival of errors involving the two of us protecting our new lord, and everyone else trying to bring the keep down around us. Eventually I ordered some prominent NPCs to cease their assault, which took the wind out of the PCs' sails.

One of the PCs fled to find outside aid. The other two mortals are the only people in the keep who for-sure know the truth about what must be done, and both vampires are bound to serve the prince. On the flip side, the prince can't simply slaughter us all because his trusted men are all dead, and he's on the run from an old enemy from Roman times, who will be on our doorstep any night now.

No one has any idea where the game goes from here, but by golly if it wasn't good times.

Merus
01-31-2011, 05:00 AM
Obligatory Dread Gazebo story (http://www.dreadgazebo.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=8).

pence
01-31-2011, 10:03 AM
It might be cheating since I was the GM, but we created quite a ridiculous scenario this weekend. The PCs are going to entreat a noble family - who they know is involved in organized crime - for the release of two important NPCs that have vital information. Before arriving at their estate, the alchemist imbibes an elixir that will allow him to read thoughts, the sorcerer casts a spell that will allow everyone to whisper clandestinely, and the ranger skulks off into the night to watch over things from afar.

Inside, the majordomo, a rugged man sporting an eyepatch, seats the PCs in a room by themselves and tells them he'll go get the lord of the house. The alchemist's mind reading powers allow him to ascertain that they're being watched during this time, so he manages to keep the sorcerer from doing anything brash like invisibly scouting out the mansion. Meanwhile, the ranger is outside, and climbs on top of the groundskeeper's shack to get a better look at the second floor. He sends his pseudodragon cohort up to scout things out for him, which immediately sets off a game of whisper down the lane:

Pseudodragon, communicating telepathically to the ranger: "I see... well, I don't know what I just saw. There were two men talking inside a well-appointed office, humanoid, but they had the heads of animals. One had was a tiger, the other was a baboon with a missing eye."

Ranger, whispering magically to the sorcerer: "There are two... humans inside? But they have the heads of animals. Maybe lycanthropes, a tiger and a baboon with one eye."

Sorcerer, speaking quietly to the oracle: "It sounds like they might be lycanthropes, there's a tiger and a baboon with one eye. Wasn't the majordomo missing an eye?"

Oracle: "... (makes a knowledge, the planes check) Was there anything, uh, backwards about them? Hands that face the wrong way, elbows, that sort of thing?"

Back down the line to the pseudodragon. "Yes." "Yes." "Yes."

"That's a Rakshasa." "Shit." "What?" "They're Rakshasas!" "What's a Rakshasa?" "They can read thoughts." "Doesn't that mean they'll know we're reading their thoughts?" "Fuck! What do we do!" "I don't want to piss off a Rakshasa, let alone two Rakshasas." "What if their guards are Rakshasas?" "Oh man, this is bad..."

The door clicks open and in walks the lord of the house, who has a seat next to the sorcerer. "So, what do you..." he pauses, and stares at the alchemist. Both of them realize by now that they can read each other's thoughts.

From here, things became a battle of innuendo as everyone danced around the fact that there was a breach of security from all angles, and an offer was eventually made, which of course they couldn't refuse. I still think the setup was the best part, though.

Comb Stranger
01-31-2011, 11:12 AM
Don't forget the Cavalier who missed everything because he was buried in a dime store romance novel.

pence
01-31-2011, 11:20 AM
Don't forget the Cavalier who missed everything because he was buried in a dime store romance novel.

Oh right, technically he was the one that broke the awkward silence by looking up from his pulp fiction to tell the lord of the house how nice all his stuff was.

kaisel
01-31-2011, 12:26 PM
So a year or two ago I was playing in two campaigns with the same group, but different DMs, one D&D4e, the other was Star Wars: Saga Edition. In both games there was a lot of inter-party tension, mainly because we didn't exactly have much of a reason to travel together. And the fact that the DMs initially allowed skill checks against party members, even for things like bluffing (which I really didn't particularly care for). Regardless, the inter-party sniping in both games were getting pretty bad, so both DMs opted for different solutions.

The Star Wars DM acted first, because he put a lot of thought into the plot, and having a party where the force user had a habit of force choking his friends (basically started as a joke response, then I decided it fit his character backstory, couldn't control his rage) decided that skill checks couldn't be used against the part.

The D&D DM looked at that response, and decided he wanted even more tension between the party members and distributed post-it notes, so that players could coordinate covertly with both the DM and other players if they wanted. Sadly, we had like a two-three month hiatus, so we haven't seen how that worked out yet.

Actually, the D&D campaign in general has been directed in a large part due to botched skill rolls, which has been somewhat frustrating.

Googleshng
01-31-2011, 02:18 PM
Oh hey, a thread for RPG anecdotes! I should tell my crazy Shadowrun story! Wait... deja vu... didn't we already have a thread like this? (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?t=10703)

Eddie
02-01-2011, 10:13 AM
The best quotes are out of context quotes.

"I give the hobgoblin the universal sign for 'we're being chased by undead'!"

- Eddie

Comb Stranger
02-01-2011, 11:04 AM
"The last hobgoblin jumps from the wall, and runs for his life across the field."
"I light a cigarette."
"150 feet away now."
"Tell me in eight turns."
"Okay... 1230 feet away."
"I load my rifle."
"1350."
"Aim."
"1470 feet."
*Roll*
"24 to hit, 42 damage."
"He goes down like a sack of bricks."

pence
02-01-2011, 11:14 AM
We weren't keeping precise track, but the hobgoblin body count was quite high. Quite high indeed.

Comb Stranger
02-01-2011, 01:51 PM
We weren't keeping precise track, but the hobgoblin body count was quite high. Quite high indeed.

And the property damage! Though to be fair, we were only responsible for one priceless bridge and a large swath of savannah.

pence
02-01-2011, 01:56 PM
And the property damage! Though to be fair, we were only responsible for one priceless bridge and a large swath of savannah.

The only thing more dangerous than one person who wants to tell you about their campaign are two people telling you about their campaign. I think you just took an adamantine greatsword to the bridge until it fell over.

Comb Stranger
02-01-2011, 02:07 PM
I used science. And an adamantine greatsword. But mostly science.

dtsund
02-01-2011, 02:27 PM
The only thing more dangerous than one person who wants to tell you about their campaign are two people telling you about their campaign.

http://www.penny-arcade.com/images/2005/20050207h.jpg

It doesn't bother me in the slightest, but that comic still works nicely here.

Googleshng
02-01-2011, 03:46 PM
One of the weirdest campaigns I ever ran included a rather dangerous combination:
1- Two of the players had recently gotten engaged (or possibly married, my timeline's a little fuzzy) and were VERY much in that Lovey Dovey "Let's have our characters get married too!" phase.
2- The campaign kind of had this whole dark crystal thing going on, where the party had to find and reunite these split crystal essences of a pantheon of duality gods (god of law and chaos, heavens and earth, life and death, men and women, think there was another I'm forgetting). The catch of course being that they all projected their power over a huge area, so you can't go steal the law crystal from its temple, because getting near it makes you rigidly lawful, the death crystal instantly kills anything entering its sphere of influence, etc. So there was a lot of working out which of a pair was safe to get first, and bring to the other.

Now, obviously, with the death crystal, they had to go get the life one first, which of course was in this crazy overgrown jungle full of wild animals and everyone's hair and nails were growing at a rate getting caught on things and ruining shoes and everything regenerated like crazy so actually killing monsters while they had this was impossible and they had to find ways to escape from/discourage anything attacking them. Pretty fun leg of the campaign.

Here's where it gets weird and creepy. Yon newlywed players of newlywed PCs, in their lovey dovey madness, brought up the notion that with all the downtime on the ship while traveling to where the death crystal was, having a fair bit of sex is pretty clearly going to happen, which presumably would lead into being pregnant while sitting right next to the life crystal, so by the time they arrived, presumably there would be an extra party member, in the form of their rapidly aged to adulthood child. Now, under some circumstances I might have shot this notion down, but they actually did the math based on the figures for hair and nail growth I'd given for how often they had to stop and trim stuff off to keep searching. So... yeah. For the rest of the campaign we've got a barbarian in the party with the averaged stats of a mage and rogue and the barest grasp of Common.

And for the rest of their lives those two have this embarrassing "No seriously what were we thinking when we suggested that?" story to deal with.

Kirin
02-02-2011, 01:28 PM
Fantastic. I love it when players take GM-imposed encumbrances and turn them to their own ends without actually breaking any rules. Even better if the results end up embarrassing for everybody.

By the way, I assume you guys all know about both Daths and Droids (http://www.darthsanddroids.net/) and DM of the Rings (http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?cat=14), right? THey seem relevant to the thread.

TirMcDohl
02-02-2011, 06:42 PM
My GM a few years back had given our group a Golem with a spell-storing effect on it in preparation for the climactic final battle to end the campaign before we all graduated and went off to our new commands (this was at trade school in the Navy, mind you. Half of us ended up in the same geographic location anyway, so we D&D'd even more afterward.). I had the party wizard cast a maximized Scorching Ray into it. Then, when the fight started, one of the BBEG's cannon fodder was a similarly designed shield guardian golem thing. When my turn came up, I moved the golem in to position and pointed dramatically in the direction of where the shield guardian and shouted "WORKER EIGHT, FIRE!!!"

The shield guardian was reduced to slag instantly. The "deer-in-headlights" look the GM had on his face was PRICELESS.

Büge
02-02-2011, 08:26 PM
By the way, I assume you guys all know about both Daths and Droids (http://www.darthsanddroids.net/) and DM of the Rings (http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?cat=14), right? THey seem relevant to the thread.

You know what I miss? Chainmail Bikini. It's not even archived.

Googleshng
02-02-2011, 09:03 PM
So here's a couple from my current, most likely to be concluded this weekend campaign:
Character the first: I decided I'd do this whole deal where I was this spy/sniper type, disguising and bluffing and sneaking my way about, fighting with a crossbow, using str as a MAJOR dump stat (I basically couldn't carry anything beyond the crossbow and a couple knick-knacks, even leather armor was too heavy). Every time I'd try and do something all cool, or even just something that was guaranteed to work on anything other than a 1, I'd totally botch the roll. And when I say every time, I really mean every time. I never hit anything unless it was one of the disturbingly large number of monsters that basically take no damage from piercing weapons. I'd roll natural 20s against undead. Eventually I just started announcing my actions on the assumption I'd screw up. "I take a shot at the demodand, completely misjudging it and burying the bolt in the far wall. *roll*" "OK, now that everyone else has crossed the bridge of chairs I crept over and placed to help get across the alarmed trip wires, I'll totally botch my insanely good dex check when I just try and take the final step out. *roll*"

Ultimately, I came to terms with the fact that the dice gods were dead set on me being the comic relief of the party, and started playing accordingly. Later, I was looking for a prestige class that would let me be, you know, a LITTLE effective in combat, and happened upon a little gem called Cloaked Dancer. The actual concept is to have some girl who's such an astoundingly sexy belly dancer that her enemies completely let their guard down, allowing her to casually sidle up and slip a knife into their kidneys. That... really should not be a thing. It's also something that shouldn't be available as an option to male characters. I went with an alternative interpretation of that will-save-or-stunned effect that the various monsters were just completely dumbfounded when they saw this. Totally worked out. The less likely it was for some big tough scary doom monster to possibly fail a will save, the more it happened. Plus, having decided for some odd reason to go catfolk, I was, in retrospect, only a constant stream of marriage proposals away from being this guy! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ud4IzDMmkcU) Eventually though, we hit a point where basically everything is immune to mind effecting spell-like stuff, so back to being useless. I was therefore totally cool with it when "gee, the only way this whole desperate cast soul jar, grab real body, teleport to evil overlord" plan will work is if the random target happens to be the one character in the room with a single digit will save.

So yeah, after the comic relief was HORRIBLY KILLED off camera, I got to bring in the vow of poverty monk I've been meaning to get into a game for years. Has this whole elaborate backstory about having spilled a high priest's drink forever ago, assuming that was the most unforgivable thing ever, and just becoming this sort of self-flagellation junkie, with all the VoP perks representing divine intervention to stop me from killing myself. i.e. "Gah! You can't just decide you aren't worthy of ever eating anything! You're going to die of pneumonia or something sleeping outside on jagged rocks in the winter! What? You're giving away your only set of clothes now? Gah, we need some kinda censor-glow covering you up there!"

With this character, everything was going great (except when fighting things that fly and such). We end up fighting a whole bunch of flesh golems in a tower (so wait. The huge tough things that resist all magic and require adamantine weapons are lining up single file in a situation that nullifies their AOOs? Yeah I've got this covered). Then though, out comes one with the face of my previous character sewn into it (yeesh) and suddenly I'm all about the comedy fumbles again until we drop it. The cursed dice live on, apparently.

Meditative_Zebra
02-03-2011, 05:02 AM
By the way, I assume you guys all know about both Daths and Droids (http://www.darthsanddroids.net/) and DM of the Rings (http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?cat=14), right? THey seem relevant to the thread.

I, for one, hadn't heard of either of those. But I'm glad that you told me about them because I find this (http://shamusyoung.mu.nu/images/comic_lotr36.jpg) comic ludicrously entertaining. It touched a nerve, that one.

Mightyblue
02-03-2011, 06:49 AM
So pence just taught us the correct way to fight a gigantic swarm with multiple attacks by nearly killing the squishies in the first turn last night. It involves screaming like little children and running away and making the swordmage keep tele-kiting in to chip away at it.

I like that it'd basically chased us for long enough that we chipped it down to the point where we just ended up shrugging and murdering it within a couple rounds of stand up fighting. Little demon bits everywhere!

That's right, pence sic'd a Huge swarm of dretches on us..

ThornGhost
02-03-2011, 10:03 AM
We were playing a game of GURPS Supers, which is an exceedingly easy system to break. Anyway, our Supers ended up being more "brutal, super powered mercs with a vague bent to good" rather than "heroes". Also, our powers were all over the place. Personally, I spent the better point of my building points on enough levels of the anti-gravity skill that I could essentially reverse gravity for any object, causing it to fly away from the earth. For damage, I carried a combat rifle.

The world we played in was just lousy with supers. There were plenty of big and small teams running around, so being able to shoot lasers out of your face was no ticket to notability.

Once particularly "big" team, roughly equivalent in skills and notability to the Fantastic Four, also managed a large corporation that we became convinced was a front for sinister deeds. The team and corporation were based in separate skyscrapers downtown, and we decided to invade the corporation afterhours and try to dig up some dirt. It was our hope we'd only run into more mundane security and not be facing an A-List super team.

Not ones for subtlety, we bust through the front doors, guns blazing while riding in our group vehicle, a sentient, nigh-indestructible 1980s conversion van. We're immediately under fire from machine gun turrets, and we race around the lobby in our van, taking them out. When that's done, we blitz through the building before security gets too thick, and run up to the top floor and the board room.

I'm not sure why our rationale was that sensitive, damning documents would be kept in the board room, because we found out real quick that they weren't.

We're trapped like rats as security fills the hallway, and we barricade ourselves in the room for what we know is nothing but a temporary measure.

It's seriously starting to look like game over when someone asks the GM for a quick rundown of everything in the room. There's a large boardroom table, chairs, a waste basket, a skylight and just regular boardroom stuff. It gives me an idea, though.

I pull out my gun, shoot out the skylight and yell for everyone to hop on the table. My party gets an idea of what's going to happen so they listen and one guy grabs the wastebasket.

I hop on as well and activate my anti-gravity power on the table. It rockets upward, through the busted skylight and out into the sky, with the whole party riding on top. It's ridiculous.

The guy that grabbed the waste basket asks the GM a question about a small skill he picked up. It allows him to create one gallon of any liquid and he asks the GM if there's any limits on that. The GM says no, he can create anything that is a liquid, and he promptly fills his wastebasket up with a gallon of nitroglycerin (remember what I said about this system being easy to break?) and drops it off the side of the falling (upward) table, where it lands in the boardroom and blows to smithereens. In just a few moments we went from "surely dead" to a clean getaway while destroying a huge chunk of security forces.

Of course, my power only allowed for up and down motion (or anywhere in between, like floating), and no sideways movement, so we had to find someway to move away from the corporation's building or else we'd drop right back down into their hands when we wanted to come down. That said, we figured something out and went on our way.

Kirin
02-03-2011, 12:22 PM
Now I'm imagining your whole team on this floating table blowing really hard in the opposite of the direction you want to go.

fugu13
02-03-2011, 12:25 PM
If there was a wind, I would just have someone hold onto the windward side of the table tightly and then give them a tiny bit of extra antigrav, tilting the table. Then the wind would blow the table along.

Glass Knuckle
02-03-2011, 01:22 PM
Your tales of gravity shenanigans just reminded me of this.

http://onatable.comicgenesis.com/d/20030711.html

pence
02-03-2011, 05:12 PM
That's right, pence sic'd a Huge swarm of dretches on us..

http://i55.tinypic.com/6pn4me.png

Hate! Hunger! We are Izyagna! Kekeke.

Büge
02-03-2011, 09:34 PM
Hey.

Hey TirMcDohl.

Remember the time Kalta killed the inquisitor?

TirMcDohl
02-04-2011, 07:04 PM
Yeah.

Yeah, I do.

I'm still convinced that Kalta is going to travel back in time and immolate me.

R^2
02-06-2011, 12:58 PM
My ultimate dick-DM story can be boiled down to these eight words: "Dual-Uzi-wielding Dark Elf... from the future."

Session yesterday had us assaulted in the swamp by trollkin. Bandits. Trollkin bandits. (This is Iron Kingdoms, where trollkin are a PC race. Think slightly smaller ogres, I guess.)

I'm playing Rogue, one guy playing Fighter specced as a bodyguard and with a trained attack dog, one guy playing Cleric. Me and Fighter are level 2, Cleric is level 1.

Well, the Cleric gets greatsworded to death the first round. The rest of the fight is a slog, with the fighter taking a hit for me that would have been instantly fatal, while we struggle to deal with being horribly outnumbered via tanglefoot bags and trip attempts. Every turn is a decision to either stay next to the fighter and mutually Aid Another to stay alive, or sneak around behind somebody into flanking position and sneak attack.

We've finally got it down to two on two. But damn, the fighter drops! His dog comes up next on initiative and turns to attack the bandit who did the last hit. Natural 20 on the attack roll, critical confirmed. That's 2d6+6 for damage, and the guy rolls boxcars.

In-game, just as the fighter skinks into the stagnant murk of the swamp, bleeding heavily, his 300-pound mastiff leaps over his body and chews his attacker's face off.

Moral of the story: If you're in a three-person party, a dog is the best 15gp you'll ever spend.

Lucas
02-06-2011, 04:59 PM
Of course! A canine party member! That's what I'm missing in our 4E campaign!

Googleshng
02-06-2011, 05:26 PM
To be fair, you TOTALLY had the chance to make yourselves a gnolly friend, but... yeah that bridge was pretty thoroughly burnt. Wait no, not bridge, tent full of children.

pence
02-06-2011, 05:46 PM
Antagonizing children with bestial qualities, these are the ties that bind.

ThornGhost
02-07-2011, 08:54 AM
Another tale from my group's storied past:

We were playing the old West End Star Wars game, which, for those of you unfamiliar, includes some of the most fragile player characters you could imagine.

It was fairly early in the campaign, and while following some lead or another we came across an underground facility we wanted to investigate. We parked our Imperial surplus Lambda class shuttle near the entrance and as we approached the door, it opened and we were confronted by a contingent of Storm Troopers.

Blasters trained, they ordered us to hand over our weapons. The group began to oblige. Not keen on the idea of being taken hostage, I mimed taking off the belt that held my grenades, mimed pulling a pin (noticeable, but subtly) and then mimed handing the belt to the GM. It was kind of a gamble, but he obviously wasn't paying too close attention, and mimed taking it from me.

I yell: "I'm diving out of the way!"

I explain that I pulled the pin before handing it to the Trooper, the group confirmed that I had mimed it, and the GM accepted that since he didn't notice and mimed taking the belt, that's what the Trooper did. I felt I was probably still going to die, because the grenade I armed was a powerful one and I was still pretty close. Diving and huddling on the ground wasn't going to do much.

The grenade explodes. The GM rolls dice and crunches numbers. We roll our reactions. The Stormtroopers are completely wiped out. Three party members immediately die. I'm knocked unconscious and bleeding out. Another character is knocked unconscious. Only our beefy bounty hunter, most heavily armored and farthest away from the blast, survives conscious.

The immediate threat is gone, but we're assuming since there were Stormtroopers there, this was probably some kind of Imperial outpost and we were going to be facing their wrath soon. The bounty hunter makes a quick check of the bodies, and loads up myself and the other surviving party member into the shuttle and blasts off.

He uses his medic skill on me to stabilize me and then gets me conscious. Despite being quite exploded, I still have to drive the shuttle because I'm the pilot for the group.

He then tries to use his medic skill on the other unconscious member. He fumbles the roll and instead of helping, actually wounds the party member more. Now he is bleeding out and going to die if he doesn't receive immediate medical help. He tries his medic check a second time, again fumbling and kills him.

My actions ended up killed four out of six party members. Needless to say, the group was not happy with me, though I found it fairly hilarious. I started keeping a PC death count total on my sheet whenever my actions helped lead to a player death. It got pretty big.

Googleshng
02-12-2011, 08:12 PM
So about half an hour ago, the long-running D&D campaign I've been playing on Saturdays ended. Not in the "people lost interest and the GM said #$% it" sense, the much more rare "accomplished the eventual goals of the campaign/killed the last boss/all that good stuff sense." We've been playing regularly from 4:30 to 8 or 9 every saturday, with only really rare exceptions for the bulk of those involved needing to attend things like weddings or graduation ceremonies. So after finally wrapping things up, we dug through old e-mails to see just when the heck we started. January, 2007. That's... an appreciable amount of time (someone worked it out as something like 690 hours I think). Granted, things picked up on speed efficiency and fun over time as we switched from drawing and erasing letter codes by hand on a bland grid in Open RPG to tossing out actual iconic depictions of things, running skype conferences for table chat, switching to the much more usable maptool, and eventually scanning maps in rather than redraw them. Here's a fun little first session (or close enough)/last session comparison! (http://www.kekkai.org/google/random/4-year-campaign.png)

The really amazing thing about running that though is that this wasn't some free-form game. This was a pre-published campaign (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shackled_City) that just took that freaking long to get through. Either we were going slow or HOLY %$@# the GM got a nice return on his investment picking that book up. I'd kinda like to track a copy down now some time and see how much of the enjoyable smooth flowing bits were the book really accounting that well for what the party might try and do and how much was the GM tweaking it. Really though, this isn't much of a story so hey, final boss fight anecdote!

So yeah. We're fighting the final boss here, who is normally just a giant pile of unfair cheese, and in this case was tweaked a bit by the GM to be a giant pile of cheese who used the very same unfair tactics our party specialized in. Not so much in an evil clone sort of way, just moving some feats around to pull the same sort of long reach tripping and playing keep away stuff, things like that. Part of the problem with this is that he was moving around constantly, and I'm playing a vow of poverty monk (with haste up). So... yeah, if I start right on top of someone I can smack'em 6 times, but otherwise I'm just kinda running around sheepishly. So yeah. I spent a lot of time running around sheepishly, and getting smacked in the face with negative level giving tentacles. Eventually though, he ends up cornered enough that I can get in there, and get 3 critical hits in one round. And we're using this funky critical hit card deck (I believe this one (http://paizo.com/store/byCompany/p/paizoPublishingLLC/gameMastery/itemPacks/v5748btpy872f)), which let's you trade off the usual double damage for various random things. Sometimes triple damage, sometimes just regular damage, usually some special effect in there somewhere. In this case, I didn't do a whole lot, but all told did a decent bit of damage to yon boss's con and dex, and stunned him (which of course made him drop the cheesy whip thing too). Added bonus, this boss has a weird feature of rerolling initiative every round, and goes from a high roll to a low roll here, so tada, wide open to pounding for essentially a full two rounds before recovering.

And then I proceeded to whiff completely for the rest of the fight because, you know, negative levels stacking up will do that, but the rest of the party got him taken apart pretty nicely, and hey, I got fixed up by the end to get the penultimate 5 hits in.

Eddie
02-17-2011, 11:37 AM
The D&D game I'm playing in has more or less broken down into "the players are entertaining themselves". Not that we can't entertain ourselves, but it's sitll a bit disappointing. We're enteirng this old keep to rescue this other player's (a Shifter Druid)'s in-game sister. This was the MO this session:

Gaiseric (my Barbarian): Look at those frost hawks that attacked us! They're surely drawn to the dead, such as Brook's sister (the Druid).

Brook (Druid): Dude! I'm RIGHT here!

Garrick (Cleric): Oh don't worry I'm those Troglodytes you abandoned her to are treating her like royalty (makes cutting motion across throat)

Brook: Still here and was watching you the entire time.

So we're in this cave system that I guess leads into the castle, and due to

a) Barbarians having scores of HP
b) a Cleric who is ridiculously good at healing
c) a GM that tends not to present very challenging encounters

I'm charging up ahead without a care in the world. I run into some of the Troglodytes.

DM: You recklessly charge right into one of them. They rolled a 1 on their Perception check, so they don't notice you at all.

Me: OK, I say hi and start my pitch. "Have you ever had one of those dungeon captives that just go and die on you? Well not anymore! Introducing Brook the Druid, a new type of prisoner who not only grows his own food, he can shapeshift into your favorite meal!

Brooke's Player: Still here!

Me: Now you might be asking how much a Druid would cost! Well..

DM: Are you going to roll to attack? You charged right into that guy.

Me: Oh, uh *rolls* 28 AC?

DM: You run him through.

Me: Oh, uh, crap! I didn't mean-- er, this troglodyte was probably their friend huh? Damnit! Okay Gaiseric, stick to the pitch! Uh, now most Druids would cost upwards of, uh, a hundred gold pieces but--

Garrick's Player: You just reduced that guy to one hit point didn't you? Don't you get a free charge?

Me: Natural 20. Oh boy, this is going to be a real tough sell.

- Eddie

sraymonds
02-21-2011, 07:32 PM
We've got a game of Scion running. Of the PCs there's a private eye, a doctor, an Interpol agent, a short order cook, and a sheriff's deputy. I am the deputy.

Four members of the opposing side break into our motel room, and after a short fight, it ends when the voodoo Scion forces me to place my gun against my head. The lead dude kills a hostage, I surrender, and everyone follows suit.

Stuff happens, everyone is knocked down, fight starts again.

So to prevent the voodoo chick from doing things to me again, the doctor rushes over to the voodoo chick and uses her Serpent's Gaze, which render's the target unable to look away or take any actions.

So after one round of holding voodoo chick in place, she shoots her in the head.

Jaws drop. Mine especially, because my character is a mostly by-the-book cop, but he draws the line at shooting people that can't defend themselves. Long story short, I drag the doctor PC out and put her in cuffs as the motel gets swallowed up by a portal to hell.

The characters go back to my place and we argue whether or not the murder was justifiable. Defending my character, times of war, easiest way to subdue the enemy, whatever, my character ain't buying it because in the end, she shot someone that could not defend themselves. Also, I'm a cop and I have handcuffs.

Of course, no body, no evidence, and I end up uncuffing the doctor PC. I planned to anyway.

OOC: Today the doctor PC made mention about all of us going to the Underworld to retrieve Interpol's spear if it had fallen in. I joked "oh hey, there's the voodoo girl you MURDERED." And Interpol's player is all "THIS IS WAR". I responded that "just because it's war doesn't mean we go around killing everyone". I'm not going to burn a village to save it.

His response was that we kill the freaks with special powers and that there was no way to safely capture that NPC.

Which infuriated me to no end. HOWEVER, he's got a touch of the aspergers, and my wife explained that this might be one of the things we won't be able to let go, so I should let it go.

Still annoyed though.

Brickroad
02-21-2011, 09:31 PM
Why would that infuriate you? Sounds like a bit of good old-fahioned in-party conflict to me.

sraymonds
02-21-2011, 10:02 PM
Why would that infuriate you? Sounds like a bit of good old-fahioned in-party conflict to me.

This conflict is out of character and he's being a cock about it.

Brickroad
02-21-2011, 10:21 PM
OOC conflict is stupid.

But shooting the voodoo lady was awesome.

My group has a philosophy that has served them well throug the years; there are always two ways to do anything: the right way, or the awesome way.

Speaking of which, we just started playing 7th Sea. We already double-crossed the guy who hired us to steal an ancient treasure map, because PIRATES!!. That was sufficiently awesome for the first session, I reckon.

kaisel
02-21-2011, 10:24 PM
Why would that infuriate you? Sounds like a bit of good old-fahioned in-party conflict to me.

Man, in-party conflict is only good if your DM isn't a cock, or making cock-like decisions. When the DM obviously favors one side, in-party conflict gets lame fast.

Brickroad
02-21-2011, 10:31 PM
That kind of conflict is the driving factor in so many games though. How boring if a group of characters always agrees on everything forever!

kaisel
02-21-2011, 10:47 PM
That kind of conflict is the driving factor in so many games though. How boring if a group of characters always agrees on everything forever!

Oh, no, I agree, conflict is important. The issue is when the DM stacks the deck so that player A's decision/goal is amazing for the party and player B's is terrible, then it's not really a meaningful choice (which I guess some people are okay with, they might like RPing someone who thinks they know more than they do, I'm not a big fan of that). The really big issue is that my DM really likes skill checks, so instead of having to actually have an argument/debate, it comes down to skill roles, with one guy optimized in social stats, and everyone else, not so much.

Argh, man, I'm going to have to stop, otherwise I'm going to just bitch about the current campaign I'm in, which isn't actually that bad, I just feel horribly screwed over in the game, and I'm still frustrated about that.

EDIT: Actually, the more I think about it, the more I think that inter-party conflict is something that has to be handled delicately by all players. sraymond's example is one that I wouldn't mind having to play with, methods differ and all that. When characters in the same party have completely opposite goals, well... that can be fun, or it can turn into something incredibly frustrating, depending on how the DM handles it.

Brickroad
02-21-2011, 11:22 PM
Skill checks? Why would the GM make you roll skill checks against another player? I mean, does he just let the other guy roll Bluff, or whatever, and then tell you, "You believe whatever he says"?

kaisel
02-21-2011, 11:29 PM
Skill checks? Why would the GM make you roll skill checks against another player? I mean, does he just let the other guy roll Bluff, or whatever, and then tell you, "You believe whatever he says"?

Pretty much, and it's just as stupid as it sounds (alright, fine, it's an opposed skill check, not that it makes it any better). Because of the way non-combat stuff is handled in the campaign is why I decided to start up a different game with mostly different folks, just to see if I handle it any better.

Really, there are all sorts of things that bug me in that campaign, but it's the only way I get to actually play in a campaign, so I kind of take what I can get. Good thing D&D4e makes for a mostly fun tactical game (and even that is kind of getting screwed up in the game). Man, I'm bitter...

Karzac
02-21-2011, 11:40 PM
Opposed skill checks against other players can be fun. I've played in a game where that happened. I was a kleptomaniac rogue and the fighter in our group caught me stealing and tried to extort money from me. We argued a bit, first with me denying everything, then haggling over percentages of what I would give him and finally ended up with me paying him off but lying about how much I had actually stolen in the first place.

It was pretty great. But this was a game where the attitude of the PCs towards each other could be described as "neutral at best." We never got far enough in to make them all best buds.

Brickroad
02-21-2011, 11:41 PM
Not knowing the circumstances of your group, it's tough to say whether your GM is in the wrong here. A lot of groups approach D&D as a purely mechanical game, where dice rolls are "the rules". If your group is like that it makes perfect sense for the guy with the high Bluff skill to always succeed at Bluffing, even against PCs.

I mean, look at the flip-side: for in-character conflicts to be role-played, everyone involved has to be arguing in good faith. If someone at the table can't or won't do that, it pretty much ruins it for everyone else. Are you, as a player, capable of willingly "failing" a role-played Sense Motive check, if it makes sense for your character to do so? If not, maybe it's best the GM lets everything go to the dice.

ALTERNATE ANSWER: A purely social character is going to be lackluster in other areas. Next time, sword him in the face before he gets a chance to Bluff!

Googleshng
02-21-2011, 11:46 PM
My take on stuff like "diplomacy checks" is, if you're going to use them, what you do is you roll before the player says anything, to determine how well they manage to present themselves and make a first impression, and take that into consideration when having the actual conversation.

The whole notion of saying something, then rolling a skill check to see if they just believe you makes no sense at all, and generally comes off really lame to boot... but I've never heard of anyone who actually goes as far as to use that to resolve debates BETWEEN PLAYERS.

This kinda ties into what I was popping in here to say though! In this Pathfinder campaign we just started, the GM actually answered yes to a question I've been asking everyone for years when it comes time to make characters as a weird little inside joke- "Can I play a half-orc paladin princess?" My policy is, if someone actually calls me on something like this, I commit to it, so I worked out an elaborate backstory for that idea to make sense (Short version- a king had some weird kinks he rode off into the wilderness to satisfy, and there was some confusion over local marriage customs political arrangements due to a language barrier).

Skip ahead, we start playing, kill some bandits, keep one alive to question about where their hideout is, get what we need to know, and then everyone looks at me waiting for me to execute him, because, you know, that's what a paladin can be expected to do in that situation, what with it being this remote trading post in the dead of winter, making it not even "kill him or let him go are the only options" but "kill him or let him hang out for a month or two mooching food until the weather clears up." Can't even have him work his debt off because there's a huge taboo against indentured servitude in the region.

From my perspective though, guy hasn't done one thing wrong. I went with one of those rare human father half-orcs. Busting people's doors down, killing anyone who tries to fight back, and looting all their valuables not only wasn't considered a crime where I grew up, but a proud family tradition. Plus? This particular bandit didn't even try and fight back. The sort of over-planning you get when a group of players had level 18 characters killing a god the week before had us killing his leader before he even had a chance to pull a weapon out, so he just ran, and then gave us handy info.

This put me in the pretty rare position where, as a paladin, the only way I could satisfy my code of honor was to convince the rest of the party, this bandit, and the guy he'd been regularly robbing blind for the past several months, that he's going to get to stay here mooching free room and board until spring rolls around. Which I actually pulled off somehow.

kaisel
02-21-2011, 11:58 PM
Not knowing the circumstances of your group, it's tough to say whether your GM is in the wrong here. A lot of groups approach D&D as a purely mechanical game, where dice rolls are "the rules". If your group is like that it makes perfect sense for the guy with the high Bluff skill to always succeed at Bluffing, even against PCs.

I mean, look at the flip-side: for in-character conflicts to be role-played, everyone involved has to be arguing in good faith. If someone at the table can't or won't do that, it pretty much ruins it for everyone else. Are you, as a player, capable of willingly "failing" a role-played Sense Motive check, if it makes sense for your character to do so? If not, maybe it's best the GM lets everything go to the dice.

ALTERNATE ANSWER: A purely social character is going to be lackluster in other areas. Next time, sword him in the face before he gets a chance to Bluff!

I agree with that: partially. I wouldn't want to punish the guy who put all their stats in social skills by making him actually have to always make a good argument, that's as ridiculous as requiring the guy who plays the strong fighter to be able to lug around 100 pounds. I'm not as big a fan of that style of gameplay, but I can understand and deal with it (sparingly at least. When it's always a character bluffing the party about everything, it gets tiresome).

On the other hand though, when the players know that by listening to some guy is opposite their characters' goals, but goes along with it because of dice-rolling, well... that annoys me more, if it happens repeatedly, especially with the skill disparity between the bluff-guy, and everyone else. When it's practically impossible to succeed, it just gets a bit tiresome, again, for me.

Also sword in the face doesn't work so well when your character should theoretically feel the bluffer isn't a jackass.

Brickroad
02-22-2011, 12:07 AM
Yeah, I know a few different ways I'd handle that situation, but without knowing your GM or what your group is like I don't know what to suggest.

kaisel
02-22-2011, 12:29 AM
Yeah, I know a few different ways I'd handle that situation, but without knowing your GM or what your group is like I don't know what to suggest.

Yeah, looking at it a little more objectively, it's mostly a group cohesion issue when I think about it. Half the group would prefer the RP/not-just-rolling method, while the other half prefers the dice for those sorts of situations, and the situation that really caused all of my frustration was a comedy of errors, and not the sort of game I was looking for.

The basic situation was one of alliances and the like, my character was basically trying to prove that his people weren't a bunch of lying bastards, found no evidence that they were (due to one bad skill roll, and one "um, there's no evidence there"), despite the GM deciding they were going to be a bunch of lying bastards, which led to an extended bit where the GM decided the little mini-adventure thing I was on to try to help the non-bastard people of my country would basically take every skill that I wasn't trained in. The GM's a good guy, and usually a good GM, he's just one of those GMs who prefers a more codified/realistic structure, and isn't as flexible as I'd like.

Anyway, thanks for listening to my little bitchfest, and I admit, I should have looked at the other side a bit more, despite how frustrated I might be. And, it looks like it's going to be a moot point anyway, since the chances of my guy surviving the next session are slim-to-none.

EDIT: And actually now I think I'm a little more depressed at how awesome this could have been, if it hadn't been a comedy of errors.

sraymonds
02-22-2011, 06:08 AM
Man, in-party conflict is only good if your DM isn't a cock, or making cock-like decisions. When the DM obviously favors one side, in-party conflict gets lame fast.

GM's not being a cock. Aspie is.

But shooting the voodoo lady was awesome.

It's tough being the modern-day equivalent of a paladin.

Adrenaline
02-22-2011, 07:01 AM
One time while playing D&D I subbed in for the primary DM and I made a dungeon that was basically a maze of rooms with a high-level barbarian minotaur inside chasing them. The players came up with the idea of pissing on doors and then going through other ones to throw him off their trail. I decided it would help slow him down a bit. It was a pretty frantic atmosphere the whole time despite it being a turn based game.

kaisel
02-22-2011, 09:17 AM
GM's not being a cock. Aspie is.


Ah, yeah, I was projecting my own frustrations onto the situation. Actually, out of character conflict is a pain in the ass.

namelessentity
02-22-2011, 10:33 PM
While we are sharing in-game out-of-game conflict, in the group I play with on Thursday I play a female character (because I wanted to know what it was like, damnit!)

Anyway, we needed this informant to tell us something in order to advance the plot. As all good informants do, he is charging us a ridiculous amount of money. Being low level characters, we obviously spent all our money on swag to keep us from dying. But that doesn't stop our fearless leader. He quickly asks what languages I know, then proceeds to try to sell me to the informant while keeping my character blissfully ignorant of the transaction. In his defense, my character was a professional dancing girl, so this was bound to happen sooner or later.

OOC I found this utterly hilarious because I expected this to happen and spent all my money on ways to deviously dispose of whoever tried just what he was doing. I'm really looking forward to the coming sessions because it is essentially going to be my character slowly sneaking up trying to poison our leader for the insult of trying to sell me.

Googleshng
02-23-2011, 02:55 AM
Man, if I had a nickel for every time I had a D&D character the rest of the party tried to sell to an NPC...

What's the actual ending to that expression anyway? I've never seen it not just trail off at the end. I mean, literally here I'd have like, 25 cents roughly? But I'd probably have to give one back for the incident where some demodand (I think? Might have been a demon or a devil mumble grumble three categories of lower planes jerks) thought my (new) character was a sacrifice brought down to trade for information (in fairness, I WAS totally unarmed and literally glowing with lawful goodness), and then to compensate for getting their hopes up someone else had to make out with something that looked roughly like this (http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/8375/housedemon.jpg).

Also, on the whole playing a character of the opposite gender bit? Usually when it comes up for me the conversation is some variation on this:
"It seems creepy to me to play a girl if you aren't a girl in real life."
"Well then I have a shocking confession I need to make. In real life, I'm... not actually a goblin! Or a wizard!"

Doesn't work as well if everyone in your group always plays a human, but still.

I also find it REALLY strange that such people are always totally cool with the GM having to play any given NPC of opposite gender, even when doing the whole seducing random barmaid deal.

sraymonds
02-23-2011, 05:44 AM
In retaliation of having a party unable to deal with a lawful-good cop, my next Scion character is based off of Nic Cage from Drive Angry.

Paul le Fou
02-23-2011, 05:56 AM
Man, if I had a nickel for every time I had a D&D character the rest of the party tried to sell to an NPC...

What's the actual ending to that expression anyway? I've never seen it not just trail off at the end.

I'd be a millionaire, or I'd be rich, or something to that effect. Because it happens a lot.

namelessentity
02-23-2011, 08:11 AM
Also, on the whole playing a character of the opposite gender bit? Usually when it comes up for me the conversation is some variation on this:
"It seems creepy to me to play a girl if you aren't a girl in real life."
"Well then I have a shocking confession I need to make. In real life, I'm... not actually a goblin! Or a wizard!"

In my experience, you can get away with anything as long as you give a scenario where it is going to be useful in the future.

"Dude, that's a bit creepy"
"Yeah, but the bonus to my persuasion is going to get us out of plenty of jams"
"Well, ohk then"

Comb Stranger
02-23-2011, 12:55 PM
We use skill checks to affect inter-party relations sometimes, but with heavy circumstance bonuses/penalties. A party member trying to bluff someone he's been travelling with for months, who <i>knows he's a compulsive liar</i>, is going to have a tough time of it. Skill rolls really only have a chance to succeed if said liar makes a compelling argument and the receiving PC is in a position to waver.

kaisel
02-23-2011, 12:56 PM
We use skill checks to affect inter-party relations sometimes, but with heavy circumstance bonuses/penalties. A party member trying to bluff someone he's been travelling with for months, who <i>knows he's a compulsive liar</i>, is going to have a tough time of it. Skill rolls really only have a chance to succeed if said liar makes a compelling argument and the receiving PC is in a position to waver.

Hrm, that's something that I should bring up, I like that a lot. Looking back, I think the main issue is that half the party is the "talk things out" sort of players, and the other half is the "roll dice and stuff happens" in my group, and this seems like a pretty good way of trying to reconcile the two.

Brickroad
02-23-2011, 08:07 PM
The stigma of playing a cross-gendered character is a lot more common than I ever realized. I know so many people who absolutely refuse to do it. We have four just in our group! If we could get two of those hold-outs to change their minds, our 7th Sea boat would have an all-lady crew.

I think I'm pretty evenly split between male and female characters. I usually think of a character concept first and then extrapolate the character's gender from that. It's not a conscious decision most of the time.

sraymonds
02-23-2011, 08:14 PM
This isn't my story, but my friend regaled us with a tale of a DC Adventures game he ran for his friends.

So the players are a super team that's funded by Batman, and they're out fighting crime and whatnot. They run into the archvillaness and beat her into submission.

Then one player asks if he can use his powers to rape her.

Brickroad
02-23-2011, 08:27 PM
Well I guess that depends on what his powers were!

sraymonds
02-23-2011, 08:50 PM
Well I guess that depends on what his powers were!

He controls earth or something. So yeah, he wanted to rape her using clumps of dirt.

The GM didn't allow it.

Brickroad
02-23-2011, 09:24 PM
I would have allowed it, but then punished him severely. Batman wouldn't stand for that kind of behavior.

sraymonds
02-23-2011, 09:51 PM
I would have allowed it, but then punished him severely. Batman wouldn't stand for that kind of behavior.

The GM's response was yes, but only if Black Adam shows up and shoves a mountain up his ass.

Googleshng
02-24-2011, 02:33 AM
The stigma of playing a cross-gendered character is a lot more common than I ever realized. I know so many people who absolutely refuse to do it. We have four just in our group! If we could get two of those hold-outs to change their minds, our 7th Sea boat would have an all-lady crew.

I think I'm pretty evenly split between male and female characters. I usually think of a character concept first and then extrapolate the character's gender from that. It's not a conscious decision most of the time.

That's the sane healthy secure in your sexuality approach, yeah. Basically I say the scale of creepy goes like this.

Least: What you just said.
I yam what I yam!
I never play my own gender!
I play girls sometimes! Really really slutty hot girls!
Creepiest:
Then one player asks if he can use his powers to rape her.

Brickroad
02-24-2011, 03:31 AM
Least: What you just said.
I yam what I yam!
I never play my own gender!
I play girls sometimes! Really really slutty hot girls!

...I hope you won't think less of me when I point out that my pirate chick is both slutty and hot. =(

R^2
02-24-2011, 12:19 PM
So we're in a city that's basically surrounded by swamp. Been here a few in-game weeks. The last trollkin/bandit fight where the fighter's dog AVENGED him was in one of said swamps.

There are two local legends around here: one is a local Loch Ness Monster, a draconic creature that no one actually knows whether it exists or not. The other is of a vast fortune found by a miner who lost it and died horribly trying to cart his wealth into town.

The bandits we defeated (quite thoroughly, in subsequent sessions) were out looking for the treasure. So we pick up the task. We begin to suspect that the two legends are linked, and that the monster is what killed the miner and stole his loot in the first place.

So we go to the local university and ask about the local flora. We get a few tips on its eating habits, its lethargy once it's fed, and the fact that having a corpse to study would be of massive benefit to the cryptozoology department specifically, the university in general, and SCIENCE as a whole.

So we go tromping through the swamp, with a horse-pulled wagon, chains and canvas, three live goats, and enough large-animal tranquilizer to bring down a bull elephant.

So over the next several days of game time we find the creature's lair, butcher the goats, bait with tranquilizer, and hang them from a nearby tree. The fog drake, for that is what the creature is, takes the bait and returns to its lair to sleep off its meal.

We follow it, find that Yes Indeed It Is Sleeping On Gold Bullion, subdue it in vicious combat, and drag the living beast back to the city to present to the university. What they do with a living fog drake is really not our concern -- the reputation we get for going toe-to-toe with the damned thing and dragging it back alive is more important.

So once we drop it off we're going back for the gold. I half expect it to be gone by then by DM fiat and perhaps the incompetence of the paladin PC we left behind, but you know -- it's really not that important.

Because a level 2 party overcame a CR 7 creature and now a whole city knows how fuckall awesome we are.

Eddie
02-24-2011, 01:28 PM
...I hope you won't think less of me when I point out that my pirate chick is both slutty and hot. =(

One of my players is playing a girl. He describes her personality as "a total bitch."

Clearly barriers are being broken at my table.

- Eddie

Googleshng
02-24-2011, 02:43 PM
...I hope you won't think less of me when I point out that my pirate chick is both slutty and hot. =(

Well I'd certainly hope so! That's like, the law for female pirates!

It's only creepy when it's totally your thing. Not unlike the people who, no matter what, always try and create the exact same character in every campaign of every game they ever play in.

Nodal
02-24-2011, 02:49 PM
I can say with total seriousness that I have never created a priest with a dragon wagon before.

Comb Stranger
02-25-2011, 02:32 PM
It's only creepy when it's totally your thing. Not unlike the people who, no matter what, always try and create the exact same character in every campaign of every game they ever play in.

My characters all have the same personality, but that's because I'm a bad roleplayer. We do have one player that tries to be the same monk in everything, but we generally don't let him. Then he makes sorcerers that punch things, and we let him play the monk again.

pence
02-25-2011, 02:56 PM
My characters all have the same personality, but that's because I'm a bad roleplayer. We do have one player that tries to be the same monk in everything, but we generally don't let him. Then he makes sorcerers that punch things, and we let him play the monk again.

That +1 Shocking Ki Focus Cestus is like a big out of character carrot encouraging you guys to kill that NPC, I'd imagine.

Brickroad
02-25-2011, 04:02 PM
One time I ran a D&D game and had everyone role up their ideal characters. I was very generous with starting EXP and gear.

When everyone was done, I said "Okay, now everyone pass your sheet to the guy to your left."

Some dudes were really pissed, but the game hit its swing and everyone had fun with it. Enriching little exercise to help get players to come out of their comfort zones!

Googleshng
02-25-2011, 05:09 PM
Oh hey, that's close to my so-old-I-wasn't-sure-it-was-still-online Dark City Roleplaying (http://www.kekkai.org/google/simplegames/darkcityroleplaying.shtml) idea. I need to take another stab at running that some time. Last time I went for this Fudge-based serial killer mystery forum RPG deal, which was too slow paced and confusing to really pan out. Plus I just suck at forum RPG timing. Ideally you need to do it in a game with some really severe differences in in the characters and their personal motivations, but still keep some party cohesion going on. Come to think of it, the BEST fit would probably be Heroes Unlimited. This week you're that flying fire dude you actually made. Next week you're the stage magician, week after you're the robot...

Eddie
03-15-2011, 06:25 PM
The druid (a temporary character)'s sister was saved by the party. The one the party insisted was probably dead, multiple times to the druid's face, completely casually. As the druid turned to leave, the following exchange happened:

Brooke places his hand on Giaseric's shoulder.

Brooke (Druid): Guys... you were assholes, but... thanks.

Giaseric places his hand on Brooke's shoulder.

Giaseric (Barbarian): Brooke... you were kind of a pussy.

Brooke nods solemly and walks away in silence.


* fin *

- Eddie

Googleshng
03-20-2011, 03:47 AM
Oh man. My character in this here Eclipse Phase game I'm playing on saturdays now is really an amazing phenomenon. Pretty much everything I do or is done to me yields a universal reaction from everyone, both in-game and in real life, of "Dear gods why would anyone do that!?! Let alone record it!?!" And then, you know, pretty much everyone suggests some way I can top it in the future. Which I will always take, because my character concept here is pretty much Transhuman Johnny Knoxville. Absolutely no restraint shame or dignity to be found.

I also dig how the GM has so far been working into every session a clip from the TV series yon character mainly recorded during various pre-campaign-start big ol' backup related memory holes. Trying to do aerobatic stunts in a high gravity environment resulting in an ultra-dense nugget of used-to-be-a-vehicle for instance, although that one isn't particularly horrific.

pence
03-20-2011, 10:05 AM
"I'm Johnny Knoxville, and this is the Jovian Nut-crusher!"

*KER-CRUNCH*

...

TirMcDohl
03-26-2011, 05:28 PM
Last night, one of the players in my regular group posited this scenario, and a few hours later, we were playing it:

Based on Secret of Evermore, each PC is the player, drawn in to an alternate reality. In this case, we were drawn in to Faerun. Some of us were changed by the transportation: I became a half-orc with an oddly high Charisma and magical talent. We all communally decided how a stat pool should be distributed for each character, and, in my case, I was classed up as a Sorcerer, and (in Pathfinder), they looked at the various bloodlines and selected Fey. I was like "what", but after reading some of the spells that become more effective in the hands of Fey sorcerers, this character is already looking to be DAMN fun.

sraymonds
04-27-2011, 05:31 PM
So my group is playing Scion and we do a little bit of roleplaying on Obsidian Portal.

One of the players, in character, sent a PM to the GM's wife, and basically said his character was going to jerk off to her character.

We're not sure what to do now. Except be creeped out.

EDIT: Sorry, the character was going to jerk it to the other character.

Mightyblue
04-27-2011, 05:41 PM
:doublefacepalm:

Kirin
04-28-2011, 11:08 AM
Well, was it believably in character? Do you get extra XP for that?

sraymonds
04-28-2011, 11:22 AM
GM's wife responded and hopefully squashed any further talk of self-abuse. If it goes any further, he's out of the group.

Here's what he said:

"He then stands and turns away, muttering something about planning to commit several mortal sins of self-abuse in his hotel bed the likes of which would make the nuns back at his Jesuit High School blush redder than baboon's arses..."

Lucas
04-28-2011, 11:31 AM
Man, my group would have thrown him out purely for the purple prose abuse.

Egarwaen
04-28-2011, 12:08 PM
And this is why contracts of play are important.

sraymonds
04-28-2011, 01:04 PM
purple prose abuse.

What is this?

And this is why contracts of play are important.

And what is this?

Egarwaen
04-28-2011, 01:22 PM
And what is this?

The idea of a contract of play is that you explicitly lay out, before the first session, what you are okay with coming up during game, what you'd prefer to "fade to black" on, and what you don't want to be part of game at all. The idea is that it helps groups navigate around contentious issues like sexuality, rape, slavery, and so on, while also providing focus on less contentious issues. (IE, genre conventions, levels of action, intrigue, PvP, etc)

While it's fine to say that stuff like the aforementioned quote should never come up in an RPG, it's worth noting that the game in question was Scion. In its source material (and modern fiction based on that source material), having mention of that kind of activity on-screen isn't even exceptional. Hell, out-and-out explicit description of that kind of activity on-screen isn't exceptional, though it's frequently used to make villains look pathetic or reprehensible. In this case, most of the group in question clearly wasn't okay with it. Having a contract of play means that preference is explicit and written down, which gives you a much firmer basis for expelling or reprimanding someone.

eternaljwh
04-28-2011, 01:50 PM
Obligatory Dread Gazebo story (http://www.dreadgazebo.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=8).
This link appears to be dead, though I know the Gazebo story.

The GM was me, but a BBEG whose method of keeping prisoners in an atrium to listen to his Monologuing revolved around the creepiest out-of-context quote in the d20 SRD:
Unconscious characters are automatically considered willing
Levitate is willing-targets-only, see...

e:...so he levitated them all while they were unconscious, had them brought to the grand hall, woke them up, and began monologuing, and they couldn't escape unless they recognized the characteristics of the spell.

Merus
04-29-2011, 01:14 AM
What is this?

Purple prose is prose that is way more concerned with being clever and poetic than with being clear. (It's not automatically a sin, though: sometimes a lack of clarity is what you're trying to achieve. Perhaps your point-of-view character is overwhelmed and can't think straight; perhaps they're a douchebag.)

Here's a recent example of purple prose to give you an idea:

Edward in the sunlight was shocking. I couldn't get used to it, though I'd been staring at him all afternoon. His skin, white despite the faint flush from yesterday's hunting trip, literally sparkled, like thousands of tiny diamonds were embedded in the surface. He lay perfectly still in the grass, his shirt open over his sculpted, incandescent chest, his scintillating arms bare. His glistening, pale lavender lids were shut, though of course he didn't sleep. A perfect statue, carved in some unknown stone, smooth like marble, glittering like crystal.

Soren Highwind
05-01-2011, 09:22 PM
Wow, I am so glad I stopped reading the book before I got to that point.

Brickroad
05-28-2011, 10:48 PM
One of our dudes blew off too many Friday game nights in a row, so his character was killed by sahaguin. I don't mean he took too much damage in combat; I mean he was lashed to a demonic altar and ripped to bloody gibbets by fish men as a ritual sacrifice.

It was fucking awesome.

TirMcDohl
05-29-2011, 09:33 AM
Ewwww.

Comb Stranger
05-29-2011, 02:24 PM
Did your characters sell him to the sahaguin first? Because that's how a real adventuring party operates.

Edit: I should add a bit from our last game. The party swiped a feather from the nest of a mighty Ercinee, a great tropical bird sacred to the jungle natives. After fleeing for their lives from the nest, they were stopped by a band of tribal warriors who demanded they face their mightiest warrior in unarmed combat for the right to possess the holy feather; a bloodless grapple, first to pin is the victor. The natives' "mightiest warrior" was about half the size of the party fighter, and at an obvious disadvantage. I assured them that the odds were heavily in their favor, even in a fair fight.

So naturally, they cheated. Both the wizard and cleric surreptitiously buffed him, while the rest of the party distracted the natives. The match was over in nine seconds, with the fighter piledriving the poor native into the mud.

TirMcDohl
05-29-2011, 02:39 PM
Man, you guys and your selling party members in to slavery. Is it REALLY that ubiquitous, because that's never happened to me.

VorpalEdge
05-29-2011, 03:24 PM
Did your characters sell him to the sahaguin first? Because that's how a real adventuring party operates.

No, but the party almost succeeded in paying a witch to turn him into a pet salamander. The only reason it failed is because a couple of the party members were idiots worried about it affecting their alignment. :<

Googleshng
05-29-2011, 04:23 PM
So have I mentioned the Eclipse Phase game where my character has spent most sessions bound and gagged by the rest of the party as a preemptive measure against getting everyone killed via crazy stunts, mainly for having actually done so before the campaign started?

The best part being of course that last session, I very nearly got the whole party killed anyway, because a previous debauched adventure had kinda left me with a bomb in my stomach. I just kinda spent the whole time lecturing everyone on how if they let me do whatever I wanted in my spare time, I'd have gotten myself sliced in half doing some crazy stunt already, and the doctors would have found and disarmed this before we left.

It's a pretty fun campaign.

Brickroad
05-29-2011, 05:42 PM
No, but the party almost succeeded in paying a witch to turn him into a pet salamander. The only reason it failed is because a couple of the party members were idiots worried about it affecting their alignment. :<

Lawful Good, bitches.

Mightyblue
05-29-2011, 05:44 PM
In our current Wed Night campaign (pence as DM, me, Destil, nameless, Red) pence set us up against an undead stirge as a prelude to the boss fight that followed. I'm sure it would have been suitably nasty, if for the slight problem of radiant damage knocking it out of the air and making it unable to fly for a turn. The more serious problem is that it flew in a hole in the second floor of this prison we're investigating, and Destil (our cleric) slapped it with a ranged radiant power and dropped it to the ground and leaving it unable to fly.

Red had the bright idea to do a charging bull rush and knock it out the hole again while nameless and I mopped up the other living stirges we were fighting. Destil and Red sat there spamming ranged attacks at it while it tried to crawl away at two squares a move and had pretty much killed it by the time nameless and I finished with the other mooks. They'd basically chased it into the adjoining lake before they killed it, and I don't think it did much besides crawl for its unlife.

We were all laughing for a few minutes solid after that.

pence
05-29-2011, 06:16 PM
That stirge was hilarious, poor little guy. His mundane brethren did a lot better than he ever did.

ThornGhost
06-02-2011, 01:42 PM
Man, you guys and your selling party members in to slavery. Is it REALLY that ubiquitous, because that's never happened to me.

One time a player missed a SINGLE game and we did much worse.

Through some adventure or another, we had recently gained some favors from a high level priest. We were trying to work this angle for anything it was worth and decided that the most useful and cool thing to do would be to try and clone a party member.

For some reason, we had decided that a "restoration" spell (usually used to regain lost limbs, etc) might be able to do just that. If a person was split precisely down the middle, and a restoration spell quickly cast on both halves before they "died" then they might both grow back completely.

The absentee player's character was promptly selected for such an honor. While the priest was horrified at the thought, we reassured him that if this worked, no lives would be lost. We tried to cut him down the middle exactly, but failed some critical rolls and made a mess of him instead. We panicked and had the priest attempt to cast the restoration spells anyway, but the body was so mangled that it just sort of "Akira'd" out in a big balloon of misshapen flesh, which promptly perished.

The player's body was ruined, so we couldn't resurrect him. We ended up feeling bad and laid down some hard coin for a druid to reincarnate him instead. This was Hackmaster 4e, so we had to roll a percentile check to see what he would reincarnate as. There were some totally useless things on there - lemurs and slugs and the like - we were hoping for gnome or better. We even sprung the extra couple of hundred gold to buy the proper incense and materials to be able to adjust our rolls by a few percentiles to hedge our bet.

Luckily we were able to have him reincarnated as the same race he was previous to his...accident, but it was fun explaining to him why his stats had changed and why he was no longer technically the same character.

Nucular
06-02-2011, 04:26 PM
One of my players decided to "revise" his backstory to make it so that he murdered the tank (who was then reincarnated) and the warlock's father. I allowed it because during the subsequent adventure, the tank lit him on fire, pushed him down a staircase, and then decapitated him.

The moment it happened, I somberly turned to him and said "I WARNED you about stairs, bro."

Bonus points: I had, in fact, warned him about stairs earlier.

Googleshng
06-02-2011, 07:29 PM
Similarly, when running that Glistening Chests one-shot, at one point there was a point where a character could have squeezed through a crack in the wall to do some snooping around, but miserably botched the roll. "This isn't your hole! It wasn't made for you!"

Lucas
06-02-2011, 07:42 PM
Let's be fair. She miserably botched almost every roll.

Manna
07-28-2011, 09:18 PM
I was using Silhouette to do a Martian Successor Nadesico thing years back, and someone playing with us decided to roll a character who was like the nth degree of 'annoying anime girl.' Eventually this led to Captain Yurika (who I find annoying myself) becoming annoyed and sending her into battle with the orders "Go to your death..."

Semi related: I quit Battletech after spending an afternoon painstakingly building an all-new Land-Air 'Mech after having spent the better part of a month hunting for for out-of-date books that allowed the construction of such, only to have the mech headshot in Turn 1 while showing someone else how to play the game.

"Uh... yeah. Let's try a different game."

Comb Stranger
07-29-2011, 01:19 AM
The same thing happened when I showed pence how to play Inquisitor. Dead on shot one.

Lucas
07-29-2011, 12:13 PM
I've managed to play Gamma World once, with one person. I went through the entire example adventure adjusting every encounter down, gave my player an extra level, all that.

First round of the game two enemies get criticals on him and he goes down.

Brickroad
07-30-2011, 10:04 AM
We arrive in a city bordering a large, evil wood. Outside the city is a trebuchet which is launching dead goblins into the wood, the connotation being: "Hey goblins! Don't fuck with us."

Obviously, upon entering the city, we are tasked with heading into the wood in order to facilitate some adventure or another. Most of the group sets off to hire a guide. But two of us -- the awesomest two -- had a better idea.

"If we bought some potions of Feather Fall, could we just have the trebuchet guys launch us and save us some travel time?"

It was fucking awesome. So what if we landed in the heart of goblin-invested territory, got our asses handed to us by slavers, and kidnapped? Those fucking pussies who stayed behind and hired a guide will be along shortly to rescue us.

Totally worth it.

TirMcDohl
07-30-2011, 11:28 AM
THIS is why true men use Cannon Travel Service.

Googleshng
08-01-2011, 06:00 PM
Score one for totally not metagaming! My regular Kingmaker group just got to the "so who's going to be the baron(ess)?" point, and managed to elect the character with the 5th lowest charisma in the party (out of 6 players, the last of of whom was out today and is kind of a drunken pirate barbarian besides).

The argument can be made that this actually WAS metagamey, since out of the three players whose characters tossed their hat in for it, the other two are on the sketchy side regular attendance wise, but still. Almost all made perfect sense in character:


The bard voted for the oracle which... actually that was purely a metagame-y stats thing. Best cha in the party sure, but... he's pretty darn spacey and generally reliant on someone telling him what he should do.
The witch voted for the bard, because she's typically the one to do most of the talking when we meet new people, and as the adopted daughter of a noble family, she's pretty much has the best recognized social standing.
The witch himself actually is a proper member of a noble family and plenty charismatic, but specifically did not want to be made our leader since he's kinda got this black sheep thing going.
While also not officially in the running, the half-orc paladin princess went right ahead and voted for the drunken pirate barbarian since, being raised by orcs and all, part of her understanding of being in charge is that you're constantly going to be fighting duels with young upstarts challenging you for your throne, and the rest of the party is really on the dangerously squishy side.
The sorceress who you'd swear was a druid voted for yon paladin because neither one is especially all that big on the city scene and generally inclined to keep things fairly verdant. She also has the stats for it but doesn't want the job for personal reasons.
The oracle also voted for yon paladin, pretty much just based on who has had the most practical advice on what to do on a day to day basis... I assume anyway.

Destil
08-01-2011, 06:07 PM
Totally worth it.

Literally every day (in game) Nameless' wizard in Pence's 4E campaign bemoans the fact that he didn't take feather fall that day. Given his predisposition to crazy plans I suspect he's going to start taking it any day now...

namelessentity
08-01-2011, 09:28 PM
Literally every day (in game) Nameless' wizard in Pence's 4E campaign bemoans the fact that he didn't take feather fall that day. Given his predisposition to crazy plans I suspect he's going to start taking it any day now...

I think if we pool our money we could buy a catapult.

Comb Stranger
08-02-2011, 12:39 PM
Score one for totally not metagaming! My regular Kingmaker group just got to the "so who's going to be the baron(ess)?" point, and managed to elect the character with the 5th lowest charisma in the party (out of 6 players, the last of of whom was out today and is kind of a drunken pirate barbarian besides).

The argument can be made that this actually WAS metagamey, since out of the three players whose characters tossed their hat in for it, the other two are on the sketchy side regular attendance wise, but still. Almost all made perfect sense in character:


The bard voted for the oracle which... actually that was purely a metagame-y stats thing. Best cha in the party sure, but... he's pretty darn spacey and generally reliant on someone telling him what he should do.
The witch voted for the bard, because she's typically the one to do most of the talking when we meet new people, and as the adopted daughter of a noble family, she's pretty much has the best recognized social standing.
The witch himself actually is a proper member of a noble family and plenty charismatic, but specifically did not want to be made our leader since he's kinda got this black sheep thing going.
While also not officially in the running, the half-orc paladin princess went right ahead and voted for the drunken pirate barbarian since, being raised by orcs and all, part of her understanding of being in charge is that you're constantly going to be fighting duels with young upstarts challenging you for your throne, and the rest of the party is really on the dangerously squishy side.
The sorceress who you'd swear was a druid voted for yon paladin because neither one is especially all that big on the city scene and generally inclined to keep things fairly verdant. She also has the stats for it but doesn't want the job for personal reasons.
The oracle also voted for yon paladin, pretty much just based on who has had the most practical advice on what to do on a day to day basis... I assume anyway.


We elected the egomaniacal, Tony Starkish prick of a sorceror, because he's a legitimate (minor) noble and the only one who really cares for courtly tradition. He also spends most of his time in a drunken stupor, and the country is actually run by a cabinet of competent advisors.

We also resisted metagaming a bit in our group; Jhod the npc Cleric had comparatively good stats for a few open positions, but we decided he didn't have the force of personality to hold a leadership position. We relegated him to 'Assistant to the Royal Councillor' and hired a (statistically inferior) new guy in his place.

TirMcDohl
08-02-2011, 05:30 PM
So, Ultimates Tony Stark?

Solitayre
08-02-2011, 06:08 PM
I am going to tell you guys a story about how my party once committed kobold genocide using a door. Yes, a door.

We were crawling through a dungeon looking for a magic pendant, but since there were only three of us and I was a white mage and about as useful in a fight as a wet blanket, the sheer number of kobolds quickly overwhelmed us. We locked ourselves a supply closet, the kobolds clawing at the outside, and basically began saying our prayers but the team paladin wasn't about to take this mockery lying down, and kicked the door down, crushing four of the kobolds under it at once.

After winning the battle we were so impressed at the door's combat prowess we took it with us as a spoil and used it as a weapon against the next group of kobolds. That door's final body count was in the double digits.

Googleshng
08-02-2011, 08:46 PM
Oh yeah, legitimacy was the other fun bit here. Yon paladin has the "bastard" trait because the GM was totally willing to let me cross the last entry off my weird half-joke character concepts list by canonizing my crazy backstory that no really, she's the totally legitimate daughter of the mysteriously vanished king. It's just that absolutely no one anywhere is willing to accept that yon old king had an orc fetish, nor that "orcish marriage rituals" are really a thing (which yon King probably wasn't aware of at the time either).

So it's easy to look at it as a "let's meet halfway here" sorta deal. Of course, "Half-Orc Paladin Baroness" isn't nearly as funny.

widdershins
08-03-2011, 09:15 AM
Hey guys, did you see? Nodal totally knocked me unconscious and is going to have some kobolds buttseks me. True story, bro. (http://proudlymediocre.com/2011/08/introducing-paramount-consulting/)

pence
08-03-2011, 10:06 AM
Secretly, I play games so that I can see myself show up in this thread.

I'm reading the blog now, Widdershins, it's quite a thorough documentation of Paramount Consulting's adventures to date!

kaisel
08-03-2011, 11:00 AM
Hey guys, did you see? Nodal totally knocked me unconscious and is going to have some kobolds buttseks me. True story, bro. (http://proudlymediocre.com/2011/08/introducing-paramount-consulting/)

Nice writeup! I hope you continue with 'em, as I love reading people's game logs. Also, congrats on not getting party-wiped by Irontooth. I hear he has a pretty good TPK ratio.

Nodal
08-03-2011, 11:05 AM
Nice writeup! I hope you continue with 'em, as I love reading people's game logs. Also, congrats on not getting party-wiped by Irontooth. I hear he has a pretty good TPK ratio.

THEY RUN LIKE LEETLE BABIES.

pence
08-03-2011, 11:20 AM
Things were getting a bit out of hand, we made a decision to put the Irontooth project on hold until a later date. It's back in the planning stages, and we've adjusted our schedule.

widdershins
08-03-2011, 11:25 AM
Also, we killed like, what? 30 mofos? That ain't half bad.

Next time 'round I definitely have to remember to take some screenshots in maptool so I don't have to do so many "and there were seven guys surrounding me with a hole to the southwest" sentences.

Nodal
08-03-2011, 11:26 AM
Thotham should've looked into the term "acceptable losses".

widdershins
08-03-2011, 12:03 PM
Thotham gets to be in a cave. This is a place that's literally MADE of rocks. Dude couldn't be happier with the latest turn of events.

Destil
08-03-2011, 06:39 PM
So I shot Nodal a PM when I first heard that he was running this module:
Let me know when you're running this if you don't mind spectators. I want to hear their laments.

Brickroad
08-05-2011, 09:18 PM
Jumped willingly into a portal to the Abyss.

Fuck all y'all.

pence
08-05-2011, 09:28 PM
Jumped willingly into a portal to the Abyss.

Fuck all y'all.

What layer? I mean, I hear The Iron Wastes are temperate this time of year.

Brickroad
08-05-2011, 09:29 PM
What layer? I mean, I hear The Iron Wastes are temperate this time of year.

Won't know until next week, but shit. They're all fun!

Mightyblue
08-05-2011, 09:30 PM
Jumped willingly into a portal to the Abyss.

Fuck all y'all.

Don't you mean "fuck MEEEEEEE" right before the glabrezu rips your head off?

Comb Stranger
08-07-2011, 12:24 AM
I've jumped off a mountain because terminal velocity had a damage cap lower than the dragon about to full-round me.

Googleshng
08-07-2011, 01:16 AM
I once was involved in a situation where we were all extremely relieved to see a dragon drop someone off a cliff to his death, because reincarnating him was a whole lot less hassle than getting him un-grappled and able to cast again otherwise. Female gnome. Every reinc in that campaign made people a gender-flipped gnome. Got kinda weird.

Also, tonight was a good one. We're trying to find people to appoint to various offices, and generally do a decent job of getting them all filled, except Spymaster. This party has no rogue, nor anything remotely like a rogue, and we haven't really been playing nice with the various local ones. Someone, as a joke, suggested we offer it to Tyg-Titter-Tut (http://kingmakercampaign.pbworks.com/w/page/37692461/Perlivash%20and%20Tyg-Titter-Tut).

I actually thought this was a great idea. Thanks to a weird commonality of certain random encounter rolls, we run into these two EVERYWHERE, they're actually usually pretty knowledgeable about what's going on, and they're always hiding and messing with people.

So... half of tonight's session was spent trying in vain to convince a couple ADD-addled fairies that we'd give them free booze and shinies if they came and told us whenever they saw anything suspicious. And you know, clarifying that no, we're not going to go around and interrogate every owl in the forest for looking so shifty all the time.

R^2
08-07-2011, 08:56 AM
Being unable to join a group of desperate need of a rogue pains me. Rogues are probably my favorite class to play.

pence
08-08-2011, 08:58 AM
I've jumped off a mountain because terminal velocity had a damage cap lower than the dragon about to full-round me.

Bite Claw Claw Wing Wing Tail

Or was it Bite Claw Claw Wing Wing Tail Crush? I forget if it was huge, or just large.

widdershins
08-12-2011, 01:55 PM
Tonight's the night for the long awaited session where we learn Thotham's eventual fate.

In the meantime, I argue with a co-worker about D&D editions (http://bit.ly/qvJ3hJ). Truly, I'm late to the party.

Googleshng
08-12-2011, 11:47 PM
Hmm... couple things I feel the need to point out in response to that. Firstly:
"Sure, I knew what THAC0 was, but since most of my friends were also getting into things around the same time, there were never really any debates over the relative merits of one system over the other."

... You know that wasn't something that changed, right? THAC0 and BAB are functionally identical, and even progress at all the same rates for each class. Only thing that changed there is that it started getting written out as roll+bonus>=TN rather than roll>=TN-penalty which everyone always thought was pretty confusing even at the height of popularity. Also there was totally this weird stretch in there where there wasn't actually a name for BAB. I want to say it lasted until 3.5 even, where they realized that distinguishing where all the various bonuses getting added to various rolls was kind of important/should have more restrictions placed. Honestly the only things 3rd edition changed that aren't just a question of clearer wording were the skill system (replacing an optional rule that didn't really have a lot of support, and a crazy percentile lookup table from the rogue rules), saving throws were condensed some (really not affecting anything notably), leveling in multiple classes was made sane (the old rule was you split your EXP evenly between any classes you took which got pretty cumbersome what with each class having a different experience chart), racism was abolished (used to be non-humans had hard level caps for certain classes) along with stat requirements for classes, and a couple really weird rules tucked in obscure sections of the DMG that basically never came up and were ridiculous were brought in line with how everything similar works (seriously, have you ever seen the AD&D2 unarmed combat rules? (http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?292903-Differences-between-AD-amp-D-1st-and-2nd-Edition&p=6483484#post6483484)). Plus they tossed in feats and prestige classes.

The only change I've ever heard anyone object to at all in the 2->3 jump is the skill system. Which, honestly, I can totally get behind. Most of D&D3's skills are for things you really shouldn't be assigning ranks and rolling dice for. A friend of mine for instance played 3e exactly once, and considered it a total deal breaker when the GM wouldn't let him tie a horse to a tree without a Use Rope check. Plus, awkward wording with the whole 4x skill points at level 1, and lack of scaling, and the whole weird "synergy" deal, etc.

The other thing is, the whole "First level isn’t supposed to be fun!" bit. If that's a direct quote then that's pretty darn crazy, I'll grant, but I big problem I have with D&D Edition X+1 vs. D&D Edition X for any value of X is how they consistently inflate the badassery of first level characters. It's not just, or even primarily, that being able to do all kinds of cool stuff at higher levels doesn't feel as special if you don't have to work for it. There's also an innate appeal to being Just Some Wimpy Dude, acutely aware of your own mortality, and forced to be all squirrelly and clever to survive in dangerous situations because seriously, numbers wise you're exactly as death-prone and useless as those nameless NPCs with single digit HP all over the place.

Plus, the whole rise in power from hapless mook to someone who can single-handedly kill 3 dragons with one arm tied behind your back, that's specifically D&D's thing. Pretty much every other RPG out there (most D&D clones excepted obviously) doesn't do that. You start out as an exceptionally skilled badass, and if there's any experience system at all, it's a pretty minor thing which, ultimately, in time, lets you grow to be an exceptionally skilled badass who has fluke bad luck only half as often as when you started. It's part of the game's identity.

That and it's just really, really weird to have all these crazy monster types like tiny little goblins and big huge dragons, but basically scale all their levels so you can be killing dragons every day at low levels, and still find yourself threatened by like, 1 orc when you're in the high teens... as the poor bastards who were in that 4e game I ran can attest.



Also, did this thread and Pimp My Campaign switch roles or something? Why the heck is this in here, and some crazy story about a sexually confused paladin/booze server over there?

Brickroad
08-13-2011, 01:42 AM
Whenever I played a class that was rolling a lot of standard to-hits, I just sketched out a THAC0 chart for my most commonly-used weapon. Easy peasy.

Edition arguments are stupid. Everyone has their favorite, and they're all good at different things. 2e has that cool retro feel, where every class has its own mechanics and systems. (I'm playing a psionicist for the first time!) 3e streamlined everything and built it off a single d20, which loses some flavor but really shines with ease-of-use. 4e turns everything into an MMO, eschewing some of the old bookkeeping methods in favor of miniatures and cards, which is exactly what a new generation of gamer wanted.

In all three editions, you take what you need and leave the rest. A GM that makes you roll Use Rope to tie up a horse is a fucking idiot regardless of whether you're talking Skill Check or Nonweapon Proficiency.

However, my group uses that unarmed combat table whenever possible, specifically because it is so retarded and pointless! Fun times.

McDohl
08-13-2011, 02:19 AM
I have an amusing one when it came time to playtesting the Suikoden tabletop game.

The group was investigating a series of rumors of the return of the original and quite dead flame champion in zexen/the grasslands.

What I came up with was, whenever the party got to a city and just opted to just stay in the city for an extended period of time, they would encounter the zombified puppet corpse of the flame champion. However, if they continued to follow up on rumors of where people thought they saw the flame champion go, then he'd torch the city a day later and follow the adventurers.

Suffice it to say, the group bounced from four cities (I forget three of the four, but the first was Brass Castle), and the FC torched every city they had left. By the time they got to the fifth city, one of them finally said,

"Hey, does anybody realize that every time we leave a town, it catches on fire?"

I thought, "Finally, they got it!"

"Huh, you're right. Let's go back and investigate BRASS CASTLE. You can't burn something that's already been burned!"

...so then the fifth city got burned. And then they argued if they should stay at Brass Castle or go back. Not that it mattered. They were going to encounter the FC, because if left up to their own devices, they would have responsible for setting most of Zexen and the Grasslands ablaze.

Merus
08-13-2011, 02:41 AM
In all three editions, you take what you need and leave the rest. A GM that makes you roll Use Rope to tie up a horse is a fucking idiot regardless of whether you're talking Skill Check or Nonweapon Proficiency.

Exactly. The systems support level 1 dragons, but that doesn't mean you have to use them. Level one characters might be badasses, except you can easily change the rules so they're vulnerable, as Dark Sun does. Wizards of the Coast will not put you in detention if you change the rules, so long as you understand why the rules are the way they are in the first place, and the DMG does a fantastic job of laying out exactly why they are that way and where the levers are to pull to create a different experience.

Mightyblue
08-13-2011, 03:22 AM
Yeah, I've been slowly putting together what's basically a slow-burn dungeon crawl for 4e where the party is basically stranded in the mountains and has to find their way through a massive and abandoned ancient dwarven weapons factory. Only a mysterious group who uses kobolds for cannon fodder and general grunt work (I mean, why not kobolds) has started to explore and restore the factory to working order for NEFARIOUS PURPOSES at about the same time. Since 4e is basically centered around a general expectation of power usage and healing surge expenditure per fight, I've had to drop in a few places here and there in the general layout just to give the PCs a relatively safe place to hide and recuperate if they get in over their heads and have to retreat.

Destil
08-13-2011, 03:43 AM
Honestly, the only edition of D&D I don't like is 2E. I'll take OD&D or AD&D over 'AD&D with pointless minutia cranked up to 11 and all the serial numbers filed off so now that we've thrown out Gygax'. Great setting books, though. And comparable enough with AD&D that you don't ever really need to play it, even if you want to use rules from it.

(May be worth mentioning I never played BECMI, so I can't really say anything about it...)

TirMcDohl
08-13-2011, 06:51 AM
Suikoden tabletop game.

:o
:frothingdemandbird:

widdershins
08-13-2011, 07:46 AM
If that's a direct quote then that's pretty darn crazy...

It is.

Also, did this thread and Pimp My Campaign switch roles or something? Why the heck is this in here, and some crazy story about a sexually confused paladin/booze server over there?

Yeah, I really only posted it here 'cause it was tangentially related to our ongoing campaign, but it doesn't really fit the spirit of this here thread. We did indeed have our game yesterday (Thotham's alive!), but I think I'll keep the pimping of it confined to the Paramount Consulting (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?t=12087) thread, so keep an eye on that for updates, if'n folks are curious.

Or you can just grab the RSS feed (http://proudlymediocre.com/rss) for my blog (http://proudlymediocre.com/), but that's just even more shameless self promotion. :D

Comb Stranger
08-15-2011, 01:10 PM
So our adventuring party has a bit of a problem with Tasmanian tigers.

Will-o-wisp twice our CR? Surprise round KO. Wyvern ambush? Flawless victory in two rounds. Exdeath*? One and a half rounds. Pack of CR 1/2 Tasmanian tigers? RUN FOR THE HILLS!

Seriously, we've run into them three times, and every time at least one party member drops to critical. The second time to a single, injured tiger in a pit trap. It nearly killed two of us.

http://nursemyra.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/tasmanian_tiger.jpg

http://img11.imageshack.us/img11/7387/massimom.jpg

*Disclaimer: Not actually Exdeath.

Eddie
08-15-2011, 02:03 PM
So our adventuring party has a bit of a problem with Tasmanian tigers.

Will-o-wisp twice our CR? Surprise round KO. Wyvern ambush? Flawless victory in two rounds. Exdeath*? One and a half rounds. Pack of CR 1/2 Tasmanian tigers? RUN FOR THE HILLS!

Seriously, we've run into them three times, and every time at least one party member drops to critical. The second time to a single, injured tiger in a pit trap. It nearly killed two of us.

If this is D&D 3.5 "CR's" they can be horribly inaccurate. "That damn crab" (http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/fw/20040221a) is one infamous example. I also remember my DM ripping our party to shreds (killing two of us) by "advancing" some wolves so they were CR appropriate. Their saving throws were through the roof; my Wizard could not land a spell on them. Also? I think the DM cheated a bit because one of them didn't fall to my Ray of Stupidity by having zero intelligence.

But i digress. Giant Crabs. CR 3 my arse. And Wizards? Even worse!

- Eddie

pence
08-15-2011, 02:31 PM
I am the GM in question, once again! They were six CR2 Brush Thylacines, which isn't too bad for six level 4 PCs. But it's certainly meaner than a single CR7 creature, which would give you nearly the same amount of XP in Pathfinder.

I try to go for more, rather than less, creatures, in general. If you want to know why, just look at how easily that CR7 tree got chumped!

Comb Stranger
08-15-2011, 03:23 PM
The best part about the tree was that it was completely immune to half the party. It didn't help.

Merus
08-15-2011, 10:52 PM
So our adventuring party has a bit of a problem with Tasmanian tigers.

I suggest giving them cancer.

Comb Stranger
08-16-2011, 12:54 AM
I actually could, (http://www.d20pfsrd.com/magic/all-spells/c/contagion) but as a cleric of the LG god of hunting, it's probably considered... unsporting.

Brickroad
08-19-2011, 12:59 AM
OHKO'd by an abishai.

But I'll have my revenge. I'm rolling up a modron.

Destil
08-19-2011, 11:37 AM
OHKO'd by an abishai.

But I'll have my revenge. I'm rolling up a modron.


http://www.worldofazolin.com/wiki/images/thumb/b/b4/Modron.jpg/180px-Modron.jpg
They're on the match again, cutter. Some dam sods want to know why so early, but anyone with their head on right just keeps out of the way.

Brickroad
08-19-2011, 02:33 PM
My modron's name is "One Who Analyzes the Nature of Death As a Singular Unified Law Which Governs All Mortal Things".

Eddie
08-19-2011, 03:23 PM
My modron's name is "One Who Analyzes the Nature of Death As a Singular Unified Law Which Governs All Mortal Things".

OWANDASULWGAMT is going to be really hard to pronounce once they get to the second half of that name.

Your doing a fine job Brick.

- Eddie

Solitayre
08-19-2011, 04:02 PM
So once I was in a party, and one of the party members was that guy. You know who I'm talking about. Man, I hate that guy.

He was loud and rude, rarely contributed to fights except to further his own abilities, actively disrupted any plan the party tried to set into motion, came up with his own plans that were very stupid and never worked, he was a major rules lawyer and generally made the game a lot less fun for everyone. Whenever it reached a breaking point where our party was about to turn on him and kill him, he'd roll up a new, equally annoying character and claim it would be bad roleplaying for us to kill him because we don't know him. Further, a few members of the party, myself included, were "good" more or less, and he knew we would never let the rest of the group hurt him, even though we were as sick of his antics as they were.

At one point, his current character was a pixie sorcerer with a penchant for lighting himself on fire, and it was high time for us to do something about his mayhem. Murder was naturally considered the best solution, but I, being a druid with a taboo against killing living things, came up with a compromise. From then on, we kept him trapped in a bottle and used him as a nightlight. I think it satisfied everyone.

Büge
08-19-2011, 10:07 PM
http://1d4chan.org/wiki/That_guy

That guy?

TirMcDohl
08-19-2011, 10:33 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6B72YToK8E&feature=related

THAT guy.

Comb Stranger
08-19-2011, 11:10 PM
Oh man, my That Guy story:

We were playing Red Hand of Doom, adapted to Pathfinder. I was a human ranger with a rifle, from the campaign setting. Everything else straight out of the core rulebook.

That Guy was pence's roommate, who stepped in for a session mid campaign. His roommate who hated guns with a foaming rage. Well, we were out fightin' hobgoblins around night, and got fired upon by a sniper in a ruined belltower. Being a high-level ranger with favored enemy(goblinoids) and Improved Precise Shot (http://www.d20pfsrd.com/feats/combat-feats/improved-precise-shot-combat---final), I took him down in one clean shot. Then the game ground to a halt.

"You can't do that!"
"...Why not?"
"You can't hit him, he's behind cover!"
"I have Improved Precise Shot. I ignore cover."
"Oh, what book did you get THAT out of?"
Note, he was playing a Poison Dusk Lizardfolk Ninja, out of Monster Manual 3 and Complete Adventurer.
"The Core Rulebook. It's been in there since 3rd edition."
"Well, he's still like, a mile away-"
"He's in the second range increment. Out of ten."
"And it's dark, and he's firing out of an arrowslit!"
"It's low light. I can see him, and he only gets concealment and cover. Which I ignore. Look, it's really simple: If he can shoot me, I can shoot him. I rolled, I hit, he's dead."
"But he has a bow!"
"...What?"
"It's firing in an arc! From behind cover! Total cover! You can't shoot him, bullets don't arc!"
"...You're saying he's firing from inside the tower, lying down, blindly lobbing an arrow through an arrow loop at a target he can't see in a boat 200 feet away. By... sound? Radar?"
"FINE! Whatever! Powergame all you want!"
"You do 15d6 on a sneak attack!"
"Yeah, legally."

He didn't play with us again.

Mightyblue
08-19-2011, 11:12 PM
Hmm, I am a bit of a rules ninja, but I'm not that bad I don't think. I typically try to roll with whatever the party/GM decides though, and the only thing I AM anal about is weird map layouts and building constructions...which the guys are familiar with, haha.

namelessentity
08-19-2011, 11:56 PM
Hmm, I am a bit of a rules ninja, but I'm not that bad I don't think. I typically try to roll with whatever the party/GM decides though, and the only thing I AM anal about is weird map layouts and building constructions...which the guys are familiar with, haha.

The lake made sense! The ground was made impermeable via souls! Everybody knows souls are water proof.

Mightyblue
08-20-2011, 12:47 AM
Says the man who Freezing Cloud'd a band of hapless rioters. ;)

Brickroad
08-20-2011, 01:03 PM
So modrons have a pretty interesting racial ability.

Once per level, I get to program myself with a preset action in immediate response to outside stimuli. This action manifests immediately, even outside of my initiative, and even if I've already taken an action that round.

External trigger -> immediate action.

The book gives the (predictable) example of, "when the modron sees a foe draw a weapon, he immediately attacks". Which would be useful, but pretty boring. I think I can do better.

The external trigger has to be something common enough that it is likely to happen once per play session. Ideas?

eta: My character's a Dustman Psionicist, if that helps anyone think of anything. The game is 2e D&D.

Comb Stranger
08-21-2011, 12:26 AM
When I drop to 0 HP > Give a heart-wrenching speech on the nature of life and death to the tune of Dust in the Wind.

Destil
08-21-2011, 01:22 AM
Whenever a portal opens within his movement range, he enters it and pops his head back out to report on what's on the other side.

Nodal
08-21-2011, 01:37 AM
Any time someone says the secret word he attacks them.

Loki
08-21-2011, 01:40 AM
I'm not familiar with the rules at all but what jumped to mind was something abusive like: when I see another player perform a skill check -> attempt the same check.

Can you tell us a little about your character? Maybe keeping within his(?) personality could lead to something fun?

Googleshng
08-21-2011, 02:14 AM
The game is 2e D&D.

I'm not familiar with the rules at all but what jumped to mind was something abusive like: when I see another player perform a skill check -> attempt the same check.

Believe it or not, D&D didn't have skill checks before 3rd edition. There were big ugly percentage tables for all the various rogue-y things rogues could do, but otherwise you'd just plain do stuff generally speaking, no dice coming into it.

I'd go with the wacky option: Answer all questions to the best of your ability. Always. Especially the rhetorical ones. Trigger: Someone says the name of an animal. Response: Explain in great detail its role in the local ecology.

eternaljwh
08-21-2011, 02:32 AM
Horrible Munchkin: Psycho Cyan Bug
Medium Munchkin: Counterspell (unless 2e timing forbids that, which it might?)
Silly Option: Space Channel 5 (react to direction "up down left right" with appropriate dance moves, "chu" or "hey" with shooting them)

Destil
08-21-2011, 02:40 AM
Medium Munchkin: Counterspell (unless 2e timing forbids that, which it might?)

I'm pretty sure they didn't have counterspelling until 3E. Not in the core rules, could be in spells and powers somewhere, though.

eternaljwh
08-21-2011, 02:53 AM
Reversible spells, at least, could counter each other (cause vs cure critical wounds). Not sure which rules set that was in, it was on my old official 2e core rules CD...purple worm says "High Level Campaigns".

That probably wouldn't apply to a psion though.

Brickroad
08-21-2011, 04:03 AM
Believe it or not, D&D didn't have skill checks before 3rd edition.

Nonweapon proficiencies!

Modrons don't really have personalities. They are basically the Borg. PC modrons are ones that have split off from the collective, but they still struggle with concepts like individuality. They wander around seeking order iand lawfulness n all things, or else trying to impose it.

He spent much of his early life (after splitting from the collective) wandering the Nine Hells, attempting to find meaning in and around the battles waged there. That's how he became obsessed with the idea of death. His first program should probably be something that would be useful in Lower Plane survival, come to think of it.

VorpalEdge
08-21-2011, 09:22 AM
He spent much of his early life (after splitting from the collective) wandering the Nine Hells, attempting to find meaning in and around the battles waged there.

And he's still level 1. Level 1 with no exp.

But hey, if he's smart enough to not try negotiating with baatezu and abishai, maybe it's an improvement. :)

Nodal
08-21-2011, 09:22 AM
And he's still level 1. Level 1 with no exp.

When he sees devils he runs the fuck away.

Comb Stranger
08-21-2011, 12:49 PM
Whenever something moves > Shoot it.

Brickroad
08-21-2011, 01:19 PM
And he's still level 1. Level 1 with no exp.

But hey, if he's smart enough to not try negotiating with baatezu and abishai, maybe it's an improvement. :)

He's letting me keep the 285 I already earned!

I'm thinking I should go with "gnome opens his mouth -> Ego Whip gnome"

pence
08-21-2011, 01:32 PM
When a problem comes along > Ego Whip it
Before the cream sits out too long > Ego Whip it
When something's going wrong > Ego Whip it

Crack that whip.

Karzac
08-21-2011, 05:15 PM
When somebody resists > Say "Resistance if futile."

pence
08-28-2011, 11:27 AM
Apocalypse World, man, we rocked that over the weekend. Considering the number of broken promises involved and enemies made through psychic pain-wave projection, we'll say it totally makes sense that the Brainer likes to keep moving from place to place.

Comb Stranger
08-28-2011, 02:08 PM
Strange hitchhiker wants to buy a ride. What could go wrong?

Bunch of colorfully-dressed men loading grain onto a truck. What could go wrong?

Pretty lady wants to pay me to track down a mutual enemy. What could go wrong?

pence
08-28-2011, 04:07 PM
In order: Joe Cardholder might use his psychic pain-wave projector while you (and pretty much everyone else) is nearby.

The Warbeasts might be a gang that steals food from New Washington.

Rex the gunlugger might walk in and go insano (like drano) on her, as well as the rest of the bar.

So yeah, lots of things can go wrong all the time. It was awesome.

Nucular
09-02-2011, 12:40 PM
My battlemind is built around two things: pushes and teleports.

Why is this important? Because it allows me to do amazing things with the environment.

Our party is investigating an ancient clifftop (important!) monastery in order to stop a death cult from getting their hands on some artifact from the war between the gods and elementals. We fight our way through the entrance and eventually come across the door to where the artifact is kept. Peering through, we find that the cultists have already beaten us to it, and are packing it up for shipping, although we do not see how they plan to get out. We decide to send the rogue in to see if he can lift it off them and get out without anyone noticing. He manages to get all the way across the room unseen, but gets caught stealing the box containing the artifact and we all roll initiative.

First off, I can move 8 squares at the start of any battle for free. I move right up to the leader, astride a Nightmare at the altar. Behind him is a panoramic window giving a view of the ground below. First round I use my shield's artifact power to push the horse two squares out the window, and the leader jumps off and lands flat on his chest a square away from the drop. I pick him up, jump out the window with him, and then teleport back into the room next to another enemy.

The rouge and avenger manage to kill an isolated warrior, and only his buddy and a psion remain. I activate my daily: nightmare vortex, which allows me to slide any enemy within three squares of me at the start of their tun. In a few rounds, out of the window they go too. However, when we look down we see how they were planning to get out of there: A zeppelin was waiting for them underneath the window and all of the enemies are safe and sound, having landed on top of it. The zeppelin is being powered by four incredibly high level mages, who stop all of the attacks we send at it. The rouge tries to jump on, but is stopped by an invisible barrier and is forced to make a series of difficult acrobatics checks to survive the fall (he does). Seems like we should let them go, right?

Not today.

I check the distance from the zeppelin, and seeing that it's close enough, activate Psionic Ambush: teleport next to an enemy within five squares and gain combat advantage. Turns out one of the wizards on the deck is just within range. I teleport next to him, and attempt to engage him in combat. It...doesn't go well for me. I'm already hurt from the fight, and in one hit I'm down to single-digit HP. Everyone else is assuming I have no chance and they should just write me off and take the artifact back to town. With no other options, I assume Battle Aspect, which does a number of different things, but most importantly allows me to teleport three squares instead of moving. I make a blind teleport inside the zeppelin into what I hope is an unoccupied square.

I luck out. Now I'm inside the zeppelin. I activate Second Wind and my Dwarven Armor, which lets me take two healing surges and I'm back at half health. I somehow manage to get a high enough stealth roll to not alert anyone, and sneak into the engine room, where I destroy one of the engines. Everyone in the zeppelin is in high alert now, and the high level mages all come in to kill me.

I teleport past them and close and bar the door to the engine room.

Then, I find the cockpit, sneak up on the pilot, and push him through the windshield. By now the mages have blown through the door and are coming to kill me. I destroy the controls, sending the zeppelin into a nosedive. The zeppelin is over the ocean, well past shore. I take one look at the water, turn around to the mages, wave goodbye, and jump out of the cockpit.

In mid-air I chug two potions of healing and barely manage to survive the fall. While underwater, I slough off all my equipment, and make a series of endurance checks to swim back to shore. I make it on my very last chance and collapse on the beach.

None of the enemies are that lucky.

tl;dr I managed to solo an encounter 10-15 levels higher than me through getting very lucky.

Egarwaen
09-02-2011, 12:49 PM
... *slow clap* :eek:

Comb Stranger
09-02-2011, 01:10 PM
I love that your GM set up an unwinnable fight, and then allowed you to win it. Those are always the best stories.

On a similar note, an old GM of mine had us pass by an ancient elven shrine-city that was supposed to become important much later in the adventure. To make it more mysterious and imposing, the only gate in the massive wall was guarded by a high level guard in similarly imposing gear; detect magic lit up like the sun in a pizza oven. It was made very clear that attempting to fight would be a very bad idea.

Out of curiosity, we approach and ask: the deal, what it is. Completely unmoving, she tells us only the place's name, and informs us in a very stern tone that there will be no entry.

Now, my character at the time absolutely hated elves, especially the stereotypical aloof asshole elves. I had no interest in their town at all, but I was not about to let some prissy long-ear tell me where I can and cannot go.

So, figuring she's honor-bound not to move, I start taunting her. "I'M NOT TOUCHING YOU, NOT TOUCHING YOU!" feinting jabs at her, etc. She doesn't budge. Eating a sandwich obnoxiously close to her face. Nothing. Draw a small jar and gently lob it at her head. This finally gets her to move, drawing her blade and shearing the jar in two before it connects.

The jar full of pixie dust and one formerly living pixie.

The guard is enveloped in a cloud of rainbow glitter, and against all odds fails her will save vs the effects of the dust. And starts dancing. Nonstop.

Shouting elvish curses but otherwise helpless, she watches in fury as I walk ten steps into the city, irrigate the street, shake, and leave, flipping her off as I go.

Thankfully, the quest got more than a bit derailed, and we never did return to the city.

pence
09-05-2011, 04:55 PM
We played Fiasco this afternoon. Normally, you have some kind of ridiculous plan which goes wrong, but our plan was nothing more ambitious than a past-due senior working for campus security trying to trade confiscated pot to a sorority girl for sex. All the madness actually revolved around this:

http://www.maragos.org/images/townandgown-fiasco.png

In act two, my socially-conservative student Ed got CRAZY. Like, really crazy. And the worst part is he got off scott-free and became a politician. No justice! Someone in the group might have a bigger writeup in the works, and I totally want to do that again if we have 3 hours to fill.

widdershins
09-05-2011, 11:19 PM
Fiasco was rad.

If you guys haven't heard of it, it's a collaborative storytelling game where you are basically narrating a horrific tragedy in two acts. The manual describes most of the situations like your average con-gone-wrong movie. We described ours as "what would happen if the Coen brothers directed Rushmore".

You actually don't create your characters outright, but first define your relationships (from a table based on die rolls -- it's oddly Gamma World-esque). Between every pair of adjacent characters, there's one relationship and one of either an object, a need or a location. Each game needs at least one of each, and any surplus relationships can be anything. Once that's all laid out, you figure out your characters.

...this is how I ended up as an high society sorority girl.

There will be a write-up for any interested parties, which I'm gonna try and do in the format of an actual script. I actually have a recording of this whole monstrosity to make sure I get all the details right. It's crazy.

Listening back to it, I'm actually kind of horrified by all my misogynist remarks, but then I have to remind myself that we're figuring out roleplay scenarios for some truly terrible people. Right.. that's my excuse.

Nope... still feel dirty. (It was a super fun game, though)

Nodal
09-08-2011, 01:26 PM
Widds: So what you're saying is, we need Luana to play next time.

Destil
09-08-2011, 01:39 PM
I just want to thank someone*for suggesting that Medusa heads should only attack when you're in a place with bad footing and can be knocked into a pit.

Kat spent that entire fight prone. I'm actually surprised Pence didn't throw her into the drink when she rolled a 1 on her acrobatics while already prone.

Really. Thanks.
*Widdershins

pence
09-08-2011, 01:57 PM
See, this is one of the harder situations to deal with in 4e. The rules actually are on the side of your character's well-being, here (assuming the bridge isn't 'narrow'):

Failure by 5 or More: If the creature is on a narrow surface, the creature falls off it. If the creature is trying to move across an unstable surface that isn’t narrow, it instead falls prone. Either way, the creature can’t move any farther as part of the current action.

So... it's undeniably awesome if someone drops into the rushing river on that bridge. But unless I specifically write terrain that does it, there's not much support for making it happen. It can also seem like killer GMing if I use terrain that drops you into the water, while at the same time seeming weak if I don't.

Proxy soapbox! (http://www.lumpley.com/hardcore.html)

The only worthwhile use for rules I know of is to sustain in-game conflict of interest, in the face of the overwhelming unity of interest of the players.

...

I'm the GM. What I want more than anything in that circumstance - we're friends, my heart breaks for your poor character, you're counting on me to give him more and more grief - what I want is rules that won't let me compromise.

I don't want to hurt your character and then point to the rules and say "they, they made me hurt your character!" That's not what I'm getting at.

I want, if I don't hurt your character, I want you to point to the rules and say, "hey, why didn't you follow the rules? Why did you cheat and let my guy off the hook? That sucked." I want the rules to create a powerful expectation between us - part of our unity of interest - that I will hurt your character. Often and hard.

Best way I've found to deal with it is to be totally open with what the terrain does from the outset, sort of like how monsters 'know' what will happen if they violate a mark (and presumably, so do PCs).

Egarwaen
09-08-2011, 02:50 PM
Best way I've found to deal with it is to be totally open with what the terrain does from the outset, sort of like how monsters 'know' what will happen if they violate a mark (and presumably, so do PCs).

Yeah, along the same lines, I've found that games work much more smoothly when I tell players what the TNs they're aiming for are, and what factors are contributing to those TNs. The confidence that the GM isn't fudging in either direction massively outweighs any advantage one got from keeping the TNs hidden.

Keeping up front about the consequences of failure is also probably a good idea. It seems like it'd help a lot in something like FATE, with the "failure must be interesting, IE, continue to motivate the story while putting the PCs in a bad position" rule. Particularly since it means that if you can't think up a consequence of failure, you can poll the table. :D

eternaljwh
09-09-2011, 10:06 PM
Really the only good reason for a secret check is spot/listen. And that only works if you keep when the checks are secret, which requires some fake checks. And that's less than useful most times. so...

Okay, Knowledge checks could also be interesting.

Comb Stranger
09-09-2011, 11:08 PM
Secret checks can be really useful in terms of roleplaying. If you tell someone to roll spot, they know something is up. They'll try to ignore it, but it's tricky to act natural when you know you're missing something, especially in a tense situation. How much does a situation have to change before you should become suspicious? How long is realistic to play dumb before your character would catch on? It's much easier if you just never knew in the first place and acted it out naturally. That's of course only for things the characters wouldn't know; if they propose a course of action, by all means, tell them the difficulty and the consequences.

Brickroad
09-10-2011, 01:16 AM
A good GM will sometimes roll secret checks for no reason, just to keep the players on their toes. Add wide-eyed stares and sharp intakes of breath to taste.

pence
09-10-2011, 09:46 AM
If you really want to ratchet up tension (for say, a one-shot horror game), my personal recommendation would be along the lines of adding dice to an ever-growing pool in front of the other players. Be cagey about what it is, but be clear: it's a thing they won't like. Make sure the reveal is forthcoming, and the players know when all those dice go tumbling.

I just haven't had any luck with the GM rolling dice to fuck with players, on either side of the screen. Players are smart, they can tell when you're just jerking them around!



Secret checks (eg. Perception) are fine, and I have no problem with them as a player, but as a GM I have a hard time using them. It's like, if there's a scene in a movie where a character is looking for something, and they don't find it, but the audience knows where it is - that's what I want. I want that dramatic irony with all the players gritting their teeth and knowing how much easier it would've been if they had just looked under the bookshelf. I think secret checks are totally a functional thing, but it's just not the style of game I enjoy the most anymore.

I'd rather take a blown perception check and turn it into something they won't like. "Yes, you find the secret door, but..."


It's broken
It's trapped
The big bad has a scrying sensor on it


Or if it's more interesting to you, just say "there's a secret door behind the painting, but it's so well concealed with the stone that you never notice it. Igor is on the other side spying on you right now, but you don't see him." Now there's tension. Now everyone's at the edge of their seats. I don't know. A failed perception roll in D&D is the saddest thing to me when I'm GMing. The player characters didn't get what they wanted, and neither did any of us around the table! Fuck!

namelessentity
09-10-2011, 12:59 PM
I loved secret rolls, but it was always fun to let them in on the secret when they failed. One of my favorite tactics was to have everybody roll 10 d20s at the start of the session. If everybody has their own dice it doesn't take that long and can be done absentmindedly so you can do it during the pre-session idle chatter. This way they know what the roll is, but don't know when it will screw them over. It was so much fun telling them they have been ambushed and watch them all go "Oh, so that was what that 1 went to"

Egarwaen
09-10-2011, 01:06 PM
A failed perception roll in D&D is the saddest thing to me when I'm GMing. The player characters didn't get what they wanted, and neither did any of us around the table! Fuck!

Yeah, any failed roll that results in the game grinding to a halt is a roll that shouldn't have been made. Failure needs to result in failing forward, IE propelling the players toward their goal despite complications in the narrative, or failing backward, IE removing the players from their goal with complications in the narrative.

pence
09-10-2011, 01:18 PM
To clarify, I'm only talking about the sorts of perception rolls you'd want to make 'in secret'. If you're going to make a perception check for an ambush, then it doesn't matter whether the result is secret, the characters are going to find out if they hit it immediately afterward.

If it's something that's a typical D&D dungeon scenario - searching for secret doors, rubble strewn rooms, the owlbear's offal - I understand if you want to keep that stuff secret. But for me, I can only say "you don't find anything," followed by "okay, I take 20 on my perception check" so many times before I get bored, and boredom is contagious. For me, I'd rather let players make their own rolls, use Let It Ride (http://www.burningwheel.org/wiki/index.php?title=Introduction_To_The_Rules#Let_it_R ide) from Burning Wheel and leave it at that.

Googleshng
09-10-2011, 04:49 PM
A failed perception roll in D&D is the saddest thing to me when I'm GMing. The player characters didn't get what they wanted, and neither did any of us around the table! Fuck!

I have never understood, on any level, why D&D3 made those stupid spot and listen skills. Well, OK, I so wisdom wouldn't be as much of a dump stat. They're still completely horrible no matter how you slice it though.

First off, they don't really make any sense. With D&D's crazy constantly scaling to level skill system (which I have some fundamental problems with already), you really shouldn't be making skills out of things that you can't actively pursue and become better at. I mean, it's possible to stop and listen carefully for something, but that's not something you get better at. That's just something any given person can opt to do at any given point. The concept of someone being better at hearing things because they've spent their whole life hearing things is @#$%ing idiotic. Same with spot. I could see it if the rationalization was that you trained yourself to look at little cracks in the walls for anything someone might have hidden there or something but... no, that's all handled by the search skill... and if we're looking for footprints, that's survival.

Second, seriously, what do we need this for mechanically? If, as the GM, you want to have some secret path off the side of the road, or some whispered conversation the party can pick up on, you don't want a die roll there. "OK, someone with a decent skill see if you're aware tonight's adventure hook even exists." The only practical situation where you'd want to do that is detecting an ambush or something but... there's already a mechanic specifically for handling that, and only that. Initiative.

Plus... it's a skill a player should never actually be rolling, just the GM, so... what's up with that?

Seems to me, if you want to reflect this sort of thing at all, you just give certain races and classes little notes mentioning they have unusually acute senses, maybe give them initiative bonuses to reflect it, and call it a day.

Destil
09-10-2011, 04:54 PM
They're pretty much there as DCs for the various stealth related skills.

Yeah, I could do without them too.

widdershins
09-10-2011, 05:20 PM
I think you could make the argument of their usefulness mechanically, but I don't think the flavor is all that unreasonable. While it's true your eyesight or hearing don't necessarily get any better with training, one can improve how well they interpret the stimulus they receive.

To use literary/film archetypes, imagine the warrior who can listen to the ground and tell how far away an approaching cavalry is, distinguish at great distance an eagle from a speck in the sky, or perceive details about someone they're hunting from examining a faded footprint. Those are all distinct skills that, while they certainly require great natural abilities, are still the result of training and practice. For a non-game example, consider the sommelier. Some people lack the sensitive taste required to discern one wine from the next, true. But even someone with a heightened sense of taste still needs to learn how to process that input before they could consider their palette distinguished.

Functionally speaking, I tend to agree with you, but to a point. I think spot, listen and search are somewhat redundant checks, but I wouldn't advocate their complete removal. I far prefer the condensed perception check of 4E, as it pretty much encompasses the function of all three, and can still serve a use. You note that initiative can just as easily be used for ambushes, but there's a difference between being able to act quickly and being able to counter being caught unaware -- even the stoic dwarf with negative dexterity and limited mobility is capable of that feat, and the check allows that to play out. Beyond that, I think a creative GM and the right group can make good use of it for other things, but that's much more dependent on the specific situation.

Googleshng
09-10-2011, 06:35 PM
This is kind of neat. Someone was just telling me they were thinking of running a game of Shadowrun, either 3rd or 4th edition. I'm totally up for that. Haven't actually had a chance to play Shadowrun in like 10 years now, and I actually have 2 sheets for this one character concept I made originally for a 3rd ed game that never happened, then a 4th years later. I haven't looked at either one in years, and I was pretty surprised when I did because I'm not sure if this was something I did intentionally or not:

While both have the same alias, spell and equipment lists, and general MO, nothing else about them really matches up.

The 3rd ed version is a 20 year old french elf shaman from a dirt poor background forced to do shady Shadowrun stuff in order to make ends meet, generally refusing any work that involves killing people for religious reasons.

The 4th ed version is a 17 year old human mage, who grew up a spoiled rich brat who ran away from home, got cosmetic surgery for Lame Poser Elf Ears, and generally refuses any work that involves killing people for reasons of being a total dorky wimp.

Seriously, I don't know if I did this on purpose, but particularly given how 4th edition is officially set a decade and change later, there's a definite comic book-ish passing on the costume thing going on here.

Kalir
09-10-2011, 07:48 PM
So today marks the second time I got a 20 on a death saving throw in this 4e campaign.

I went below 0 hit points twice today.

I only rolled a 20 on one death saving throw today.

This save did have a penalty attached to it for recently dying, but I did not get a chance to save against that earlier death, because the attack that caused me to die dealt about 70 damage when I had 5 health left.

I think my GM is a bit of a sadist.

Googleshng
09-18-2011, 03:52 PM
Speaking of 20s, I came THIS close yesterday to dying from the oh-so-rarely invoked Triple 20 Rule. As it was, still rather bad luck ending up taking a 30 damage hit from something that would have missed me if it rolled a 19.

Also, I just remembered I haven't shared this wonderful thing of glory with the rest of the class, and I figure this is as good a place to do so as any.

Behold the glory that is the Vintage Shadowrun Promo Video! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GPGQoR6f6w)

And in other news, considering how I set out to be totally tolerant and understanding of everyone's cultural differences, I sure am forcing a lot of reptillian dudes to reject all their religious beliefs in this Kingmaker game. Kinda wish I'd picked a god more fitting as a potential replacement than Iomedae.

I mean, it's not like there's any real moral conflict involved there, it's just that I'm not really comfortable preaching a selfless Big Damn Hero code of conduct to a bunch of little lizard-puppies who were suffering notable losses in a conflict with a rival gang of smurves, you know?

Comb Stranger
09-18-2011, 05:18 PM
The kobolds? We ran into and befriended a scouting party, exterminating the mites for them to buy us an audience, then used bardic trickery to convince the assembly that the instigator was a lying heretic. He tried to incite a civil war, but we cut him down in the first round before anyone knew what was going on. Now they work our mines in return for food and protection.

Googleshng
09-18-2011, 11:09 PM
The kobolds? We ran into and befriended a scouting party, exterminating the mites for them to buy us an audience, then used bardic trickery to convince the assembly that the instigator was a lying heretic. He tried to incite a civil war, but we cut him down in the first round before anyone knew what was going on. Now they work our mines in return for food and protection.

That's about how things went with my group too, except the GM takes pride in realistic depictions of very stupid and/or spacey NPCs (trying to offer the position of Spymaster to Tyg-tittertut went... poorly). Attempting to expose the instigator largely turned into a prestidigitation slap fight, which EVENTUALLY got the message across, but there was a little bit of in-fighting and the party literally holding kobolds apart from each other.

Really though, I was referring to how just now, in chapter 2 here there's a whole lizardfolk village with suspiciously similar deal going on. We're technically still in the middle of that, but the fashion in which things was addressed proved decidedly... less diplomatic.

Speaking of which, since I ended up in charge in my group, I just sat down tonight and drafted up some laws (http://kingmakercampaign.pbworks.com/w/page/45733070/The%20Laws%20of%20Tuskwood).

I'm particularly amused at how low on the list, and with how many exceptions, I had to end up sticking "Don't kill people."

Plus, seriously, every RPG kingdom needs that first law of mine on the books. It comes up all the freaking time.

Mightyblue
09-18-2011, 11:22 PM
Honestly though, most of the time you could easily say that the first law is a subset of the last one.

Googleshng
09-19-2011, 03:13 AM
Honestly though, most of the time you could easily say that the first law is a subset of the last one.

Well, you could say that about all of'em. You kinda need more laws than just "Don't be a jerk" though. Besides, without the prioritization, how would us PCs justify killing dudes and taking all their stuff, like, all the time!

Mightyblue
09-19-2011, 03:31 AM
Well, you could say that about all of'em. You kinda need more laws than just "Don't be a jerk" though. Besides, without the prioritization, how would us PCs justify killing dudes and taking all their stuff, like, all the time!

Well, right, but dooming the world is pretty much the epitome of jerkiness.

Real answer: Depending on alignment and the way the PCs have developed their characters, roleplaying?

Alternate joke answer: You need to justify that?

Googleshng
09-19-2011, 03:51 AM
Oh, well fun roleplaying rationalization times come into it when we hit stuff like how the witch on the party, just this last session, leveled up and learned Howling Agony.

I mean, technically I already left him an out for that sort of thing, but... that's going to lead to a Discussion.

Lucas
09-19-2011, 11:38 AM
That last one forcibly reminds me of Sims Medieval and how almost the very first thing the game has you do is send someone to the stocks for shoving.

Comb Stranger
09-19-2011, 03:27 PM
I'm an LG cleric of an LG diety, and I make liberal use of Archon's Aura and Instrument of Agony. Pain and terror are okay on evil things, right?

Traumadore
09-20-2011, 01:46 PM
I'm an LG cleric of an LG diety, and I make liberal use of Archon's Aura and Instrument of Agony. Pain and terror are okay on evil things, right?

Judging by the Ravages in the old Book of Exalted Deeds, yes! They're horrible poisons that only work on evil aligned creatures.

pence
09-20-2011, 01:51 PM
I'm pretty sure the addition of Good and Evil to the Law and Chaos axis was done specifically so people could start arguments about poison use. Applied to characters (or spells in 3e and earlier) alignment barely comes up in any of my actual play. But it's a convenient way of categorizing a pantheon of deities, and the world also got Planescape out of it.

@Comb, the only time alignment has come up this campaign is when a barghest had mustered a tribe of goblins to attack and loot your town. The magus tried, I dunno, Magic Circle Against Chaos or something, and then everyone was sad that barghests are Lawful Evil. And then the brand new spell your cleric learned, Arrow of Law, did nothing.

Googleshng
09-20-2011, 02:47 PM
Judging by the Ravages in the old Book of Exalted Deeds, yes! They're horrible poisons that only work on evil aligned creatures.

On the other hand, there's a not insignificant number of people who condemn the whole book over the whole "ravage" concept.

Nodal
09-20-2011, 03:07 PM
On the other hand, there's a not insignificant number of people who condemn the whole book over the whole "ravage" concept.

Fans, amirite?

Googleshng
09-20-2011, 03:43 PM
Well you have to admit there's something kinda messed up about the super ultra book of super extra goodness going "OK, so like, it's considered totally evil to ever poison anyone, even if they're a super bad guy right? OK, but like... what if it was some kind of MAGIC poison that only worked if the person you slipped it to really was definitely a bad guy, and didn't do anything at all to good guys?"

I mean, that's some Axe Cop morality right there. The whole concept pretty much begs you to dump all the ravages you can find into the city's drinking water to preemptively murder anyone who may cause trouble down the road, and that's really not something the good guys should ever be doing.

Personally, I'm not inclined to throw the whole book out over that, because it's also the book with the whole Vow of Poverty bit in it. Which, granted, is also totally stupid, but I really like having a means of just kinda giving the finger to the whole shopping for magic items scene without totally screwing yourself over or ending up with a giant pile of money you can't really spend on anything.

Comb Stranger
09-20-2011, 05:04 PM
The vows came back in Ultimate Combat for Pathfinder, actually. They're greatly nerfed, and apply only to monks & paladins (being the oathy guys, naturally; Cavaliers also have oaths as central class features). You get extra uses of ki/lay on hands, but are permanently banned from committing certain acts. It's basically throwing a bone to characters that would roleplay unbalancing hindrances anyway, so they don't fall behind the expected power level.

Brickroad
09-23-2011, 09:25 AM
We were discussing alignment just last night. I was flipping through the 2e Paladin book, and came across the section that lists penalties for chaotic and/or evil actions. The penalty for chaotic actions (moment of panic, indecisiveness, telling a lie) involve finding a priest, saying some hail marys, maybe putting in some hard labor at a monastery.

The penalty for evil actions (greed, malice, selfishness) is: you can never be a paladin again ever. You immediately revert to a fighter, lose all your holy abilities, and oh yeah, since you weren't a fighter to begin with you don't even pick up any of the perks like weapon specialization.

This struck me as retarded because it means the "good" aspect of being a paladin is more important than the "lawful" aspect. The reason for this is that, back in 2e at least, alignment was treated in such a way that good/evil were the important bits, while law/chaos were just sort of flavoring, and it was expected characters would never perform evil actions anyway. But to me, it sort of felt like it defeated the purpose of playing a Lawful Good character. Lawful Good does not mean "good first and foremost, but follow the laws if you can help it".

Planescape came along and skewed things the opposite direction. In that setting, Law/Chaos/Good/Evil are treated as forces of nature, with just as much (if not more!) emphasis placed on the Law/Chaos axis. Of course, with all the bribing and political posturing involved in a good Planescape campaign, playing a paladin would be virtually impossible anyway. "Sorry guys. We bribed that baatezu, so now I have to go plow fields. See you in a month. =("

Destil
09-23-2011, 10:14 AM
Sepulchrave’s Tales of Wyre (http://leagueofimaginaryheroes.wordpress.com/2009/03/22/sepulchraves-tales-of-wyre/), aside from being a fantastic read, has a pretty fairly in depth amount of story/character development (for a campaign journal) dedicated to the opposition of the needs of a lawful good church, when law and good come into conflict. It's a fascinating story all-around and the paladin Eadric's ends up having to juggle the two quite often.

Fair warning: it's unfinished and the writer hasn't shown up on ENWorld for a few years at this point.

[linked that blog post because it has links to the PDFs and I'm guessing the firewall at work won't let me to to EN World]

Daikaiju
09-24-2011, 12:27 PM
I come in here expecting table stories and find Rules Lawyering?

SHENANIGANS!

namelessentity
09-24-2011, 03:41 PM
I come in here expecting table stories and find Rules Lawyering?

SHENANIGANS!

The code word for when we are about to launch in a rule lawyering tyrand for my group is shenanigans.

Mightyblue
09-24-2011, 04:40 PM
We don't really do much rules lawyering in the Wed night game unless there's something particularly vague or nonsensical in the rules as written. I think I sputter a bit about the crazy nonsense architecture from time to time, but most of our disputes are all pretty nitpicky things.

eternaljwh
09-24-2011, 07:08 PM
I sputter a bit about the crazy nonsense architectureThe rules for architecture-as-spellbook are in Complete Arcane. They might explain it. it is a joke

Googleshng
09-24-2011, 09:37 PM
I come in here expecting table stories and find Rules Lawyering?

SHENANIGANS!

If it's any consolation, all the rules talk is a crazy tangent from my written-in-character laws for a new kingdom.

So funny story with Kingmaker Chapter 2 spoilerage:
So we come back to town after rescuing this kid who was being tortured by lizard people who bought that some will-o-the-wisp was the ghost of their ancestors. Things worked out pretty well on that one actually. I mean, yeah, we left them with half their population as a pile of corpses heaped up by their gates, but honestly! We left on good terms! They gave us presents and I gave them a nicely written note to show people who can't speak lizard if they ever have a problem and need help.

But anyway yeah, we come back to town after that, and oh hey, there's totally a werewolf on a rampage. I don't even know how I got to werewolf so fast. Mainly it's just because before we headed out this time I gave a big long speech about not wandering off to be killed by huge monsters, so... big hairy monster attacks IN town? Hey, the moon isn't full is it? Anyway, the point is, yeah, savage wolf attacks all over, and just on my way back into town, I'd picked up my non-standard Paladin Mount. Which uh...
http://images4.fanpop.com/image/photos/23100000/Ghost-jon-snow-23159768-500-282.gif

So yeah. Made things slightly awkward.

Comb Stranger
09-25-2011, 01:22 AM
So we played mouse guard. We had:

Graham, the patrol leader: a jaded, no-nonsense veteran who despises pretense and glory. He takes on the softest recruits out of a sense of duty, attempting to forge them into respectable soldiers of the guard. Results vary.

Nolan, the guardsmouse: a fat, peace-loving berry-picker who joined the guard to make his parents proud. It didn't work. The 'pathfinder specialist' of the group, he consistently gets us lost taking shortcuts to avoid exercise.

And Flynn Ryder, the tenderpaw recruit: brash, inquisitive and friendly to a fault, he cheerfully introduces himself to everyone we meet, including the weasel patrol taking us captive.

We were sent on a mission to deliver mail to three villages. We lost part of it, got the rest wet, and wound up getting captured by weasels across the border. It was a carnival of failure.

pence
09-25-2011, 01:35 AM
Losing is fun!
\
http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/image.php?u=402&dateline=1272393336

I also liked going out of your way to fail a Persuader versus test against an NPC who started out rolling 1D. (It was actually a great move, since the players wanted to agree with him out of character, and doing so got Graham extra checks)

Heroes fall, heroes break, heroes bleed.
They shed bitter tears, pull themselves up, not to concede.
Often are they waylaid and frequent they mourn.
Heroes are rarely made and even more seldom born.
Not till after they die, do mice sing of their tale.
A job, a duty, a thankless obligation not to fail.
Still many a mouse think only the name is required
What becomes of them? They either quit or expire.

I'd say, honestly, that bravery was pretty prevalent in that game. Nolan using his sling to bullseye the mailbag, and then later pulling the nest out of that tree. The second part was my favorite scene! He failed the check, but in the fiction he totally rocked because I used the failure to add a weather twist.

Comb Stranger
09-25-2011, 12:13 PM
And the fact that tagging Fat got us into and out of that mess.

Lucas
09-29-2011, 10:25 AM
Yesterday my friend told me he was thinking of starting a new Tri-Stat game, so of course I immediately started making a new character. She went through several hours of revisions and "I think this would be fun" until she eventually had, among other things, one power I had to describe to the GM as "a holy dragon gimp suit" and a breath weapon that's essentially a napalm-launching artillery piece.

This girl should be fun.

Kalir
09-29-2011, 09:26 PM
"No, the door isn't trapped", says the magically-trained guy with a wisdom score to my superstitious fighter. He rolls a 20 on his untrained bluff check, I roll a 19 on my untrained sense motive, I get almost instakilled by the trap on the door.

I swear, if there is such a thing as karma in this world, at this rate I'm going to discover the cure for cancer by choking on it.

pence
10-16-2011, 01:22 PM
Have you ever gambled your immortal soul on a game of blackjack with a ghost guarding a door, and lost? Damned to spend eternity challenging others to games of blackjack, to free your soul? Then, your party makes their way through the door, searches around, comes back out and says, "it wasn't worth it. Nothing even in there"?

The party even used chalk to write "not worth it, don't play" on the floor, in case more adventurers came by later.

Edgar the level 1 elf, you died in vain.

Comb Stranger
10-16-2011, 04:12 PM
A game of blackjack that no one, including a coin flip, thought he should play.

namelessentity
10-19-2011, 11:06 PM
So, my group has been playing the Star Wars roleplaying game since high school. This time I'm playing a droid(ME), someone else is playing a wookie(A1 SAUCE), and someone else is going to be knocked out three seconds into this story(DEADIE).

So the other two are part of a disbanded mercenary party, and I have been separated from my mercenary party, so we joined up because it was convenient. We get this mission to reclaim a stolen ship which was taken by a rogue Jedi. After dealing with meaningless thugs we finally get to his quarters. The Jedi steps out holding my old captain hostage. With a wink and a nod, A1 SAUCE springs across the room and slides my captain to safety. I hurry over to free him from his restraints, at which point my captain takes a pistol and shoots A1 SAUCE. I ask "Why did you do that?" to which he responds "Listen to me, just kill these guys." Being a droid, and fiercely loyal to my old crew, I don't even bat an eye and start attacking.

At this time, DEADIE tries to keep the Jedi busy with a meaningless shot to the face. The Jedi uses a force power to hurl him across the room into a wall. Critical hit. He went from full health to -1 in a single hit. A1 SAUCE panics, grabs DEADIE, jumps into the lift and mashes the up button. He barely escapes, but is now trapped in the control room.

After asking my captain if he is all right, we gather the remaining thugs and march with the Jedi up to the control room. They have disabled the elevator up to them, so we have to climb. We send a few thugs up to weaken them, then I climb up to start taking them down. As soon as A1 SAUCE sees the whites of my photo receptors, he presses a button and the elevator plummets five stories. I take about half my hit points in damage, but am still operational. All I have to do is climb back up.

Meanwhile, the Jedi, his assistant, and my captain have all engaged A1 SAUCE. He has weakened them as they came down the corridor at him, but in a up close fight with three of them he knows he isn't going to win. He thinks if he can drop one of them before they reach him he might have a chance, but then bad luck strikes. He's out of ammo, switches guns, then that one runs out of ammo. He is about to switch to his melee weapon when he spies down the corridor me finally making my way out of the elevator shaft.

"Screw it" and A1 SAUCE presses a button, the window at the front of the ship blows out, the Jedi is sucked into space, my captain asphyxiates on the ground. I barely have time to grab the assistant before she is lost too. We close the blast doors and I start walking back to the elevator. The assistant starts freaking out and shouts "Where the hell are you going?"

"Jobs over, I'm going back to my crew."

tl;dr
I killed two PCs, and it was awesome.

pence
10-20-2011, 07:18 AM
My pressing question is, what version of Star Wars do you play? d20? SAGA? Dare I say... d6 Star Wars?

My fondness for that game is probably due to it being my first RPG.

namelessentity
10-20-2011, 08:17 AM
My pressing question is, what version of Star Wars do you play? d20? SAGA? Dare I say... d6 Star Wars?

My fondness for that game is probably due to it being my first RPG.

Whatever the new one is that they refuse to call 4th edition but is clearly based on 4th edition. We used to play the old d20 system, which had some obvious flaws but was still really good.

kaisel
10-20-2011, 09:34 AM
Whatever the new one is that they refuse to call 4th edition but is clearly based on 4th edition. We used to play the old d20 system, which had some obvious flaws but was still really good.

That'd be SAGA I think, which was actually used as the basis for 4th edition (instead of the other way around). It's a pretty solid system, aside from being really easy to break if you decide to be a Force user.

Comb Stranger
10-20-2011, 09:37 AM
That'd be SAGA I think, which was actually used as the basis for 4th edition (instead of the other way around). It's a pretty solid system, aside from being really easy to break if you decide to be a Force user.

When has being a demigod Jedi ever been balanced in any way?

widdershins
10-20-2011, 09:44 AM
d6 Star Wars was the business.

namelessentity
10-20-2011, 09:48 AM
We are having trouble with the fact that you can't really die. If you have a force point you can spend it to instantly save from death. As long as the enemies don't coup de grace (which our GM won't let them do) you can't really die outside of ridiculousness (sucked into space, eaten by a sarlaak, etc.)

That and the massive amount of errors in the source books. For example, these two items are listed right next to each other:

Rations: 1500 credits
JetPack: 20 credits

Something just doesn't seem right about that.

Comb Stranger
10-20-2011, 10:02 AM
We are having trouble with the fact that you can't really die. If you have a force point you can spend it to instantly save from death. As long as the enemies don't coup de grace (which our GM won't let them do) you can't really die outside of ridiculousness (sucked into space, eaten by a sarlaak, etc.)

That and the massive amount of errors in the source books. For example, these two items are listed right next to each other:

Rations: 1500 credits
JetPack: 20 credits

Something just doesn't seem right about that.

I dunno, I remember my friend trying to explain that the Star Wars universe never invented paper. I'm sure somewhere in the expanded universe there's a planet where giant slugs crap jetpacks because Force.

namelessentity
10-20-2011, 10:17 AM
I dunno, I remember my friend trying to explain that the Star Wars universe never invented paper. I'm sure somewhere in the expanded universe there's a planet where giant slugs crap jetpacks because Force.

It is actually in the GM notes of the core book. Reading it, it sounds like they are quite adamant about paper not existing in the Star Wars universe. Something to do with maintaining the sci fi environment, yada yada yada.

Another error that pissed me off was the description of one of my feats. In the short feat list blurb it says "3x strength damage on hit" in the actual feat description it says "Add an extra die worth of unarmed damage." That is a huge difference in my damage output (8-14 vs 18-22).

Egarwaen
10-20-2011, 10:42 AM
The starship combat rules are also head-scratchingly bad. I'm pretty sure that someone on the development staff wrote them in one pass, then handed them to a bunch of freelancers and said "Now build some starships that can fight using these!" It's obvious that they were never play-tested or, you know, read through more than once. They simply don't work for recreating the kind of starship action seen in the movies. Fighter-bombers can't scratch capital ships, and transports like the Millennium Falcon are flying death-traps.

kaisel
10-20-2011, 11:08 AM
When has being a demigod Jedi ever been balanced in any way?

Heh, true. A stabby Jedi isn't too bad, it's the Force-power focusing that's the real problem. Especially when you add in Skill Focus: Use the Force, where you're basically auto-hitting on anything but a 1.

Coincidentally, I'm running a session of Star Wars: SAGA this weekend, which should be interesting. Everyone's playing a Jedi, but two went for the more stabbing side of things, and the other went all out with Force Powers. Trying to make this fun for everyone is going to be interesting...

Mogri
10-20-2011, 01:10 PM
Make the entire campaign a "paladin trap" and see who racks up Dark Side points the fastest.

Egarwaen
10-20-2011, 01:14 PM
Coincidentally, I'm running a session of Star Wars: SAGA this weekend, which should be interesting. Everyone's playing a Jedi, but two went for the more stabbing side of things, and the other went all out with Force Powers. Trying to make this fun for everyone is going to be interesting...

Step #1: Watch the original Clone Wars cartoon shorts.

Step #2: Split the party. :D

Comb Stranger
10-20-2011, 05:41 PM
Just for god's sake, don't do it with completely random forcefields that serve no apparent purpose.

http://grupthinkpro.s3.amazonaws.com/grupthinklive9bdf64c827f1d7f6ce699631b6056955

pence
10-20-2011, 06:59 PM
And then a force field separates you from Nobleus, the brave Jedi! At first, you despair, as Nobleus and Evilus are separated from you. "It ends here, Nobelus" Evilus snarls. "Force, give me strength!" Nobelus intones bravely! Your hearts soar to hear such noble words! So perfect, Nobleus is, as he fights against all odds. You are inspired by his technique, and his brave awesomeness!

"Yes, Nobleus, save the planet!" you cry!

*Proceeds to play out an 8-round long combat between two NPCs*

Solitayre
10-20-2011, 08:09 PM
Step #1: Watch the original Clone Wars cartoon shorts.

Step #2: Split the party. :D

Oh man, you never split the party!

Actually, one of my very first campaigns started with the party split. Near the end, the two parties joined.

One of the parties had a paladin, a witch hunter and a holy priest, the other party had a very evil death mage in it.

It did not end well for anyone.

namelessentity
10-21-2011, 08:27 AM
Oh man, you never split the party!

Actually, one of my very first campaigns started with the party split. Near the end, the two parties joined.

One of the parties had a paladin, a witch hunter and a holy priest, the other party had a very evil death mage in it.

It did not end well for anyone.

I have been fiercely warned against playing an evil character whenever we start a game. It isn't like the rest of the party are saints, but I'm just slightly more evil than the rest. Personally, I think the inter-party tension can be just as fun as opposed to ending up with "Why are you guys together" "The campaign needs a party of four"

My first reaction whenever we come to a new ship or space station "Let's turn off life support" "What if somebody good is here" "Sucks to be them, I don't want to die to the hoards of baddies"

Fun Fact: Had the party listened to me and turned off life support, I never would have met my old captain and wouldn't have been ordered to kill them.

kaisel
10-21-2011, 09:02 AM
And then a force field separates you from Nobleus, the brave Jedi! At first, you despair, as Nobleus and Evilus are separated from you. "It ends here, Nobelus" Evilus snarls. "Force, give me strength!" Nobelus intones bravely! Your hearts soar to hear such noble words! So perfect, Nobleus is, as he fights against all odds. You are inspired by his technique, and his brave awesomeness!

"Yes, Nobleus, save the planet!" you cry!

*Proceeds to play out an 8-round long combat between two NPCs*

Heh, my group mocks like a 5-10 second conversation between two NPCs, I think I'd have my dice shoved down my throat after round 2.

Personally, I think the inter-party tension can be just as fun as opposed to ending up with "Why are you guys together" "The campaign needs a party of four"

I like inter-party tension, so long as the party itself works together. Usually we end up with one guy who has to be dragged into everything, or is manipulating everyone else because of his absurdly high bluff, insight, and diplomacy skills, which is never fun.

namelessentity
10-21-2011, 09:29 AM
I like inter-party tension, so long as the party itself works together. Usually we end up with one guy who has to be dragged into everything, or is manipulating everyone else because of his absurdly high bluff, insight, and diplomacy skills, which is never fun.

I try to keep it from slowing the game down, I just try to declare my motivations early, but when the group vetoes it I move forward. I just take it as a badge of honor that in a different campaign one of the party members hired bandits to mug the party and "accidentally" kill me because he feared that my "kill them all and let some deity sort it out" mentality would get them into trouble one day.

I think it depends on the group. I wouldn't do that in a different group, but I know these guys get a kick out of it (and sometimes the GM even encourages it)

Egarwaen
10-21-2011, 11:01 AM
I like inter-party tension, so long as the party itself works together. Usually we end up with one guy who has to be dragged into everything, or is manipulating everyone else because of his absurdly high bluff, insight, and diplomacy skills, which is never fun.

Overly antagonistic characters are a problem regardless of morality system. Even if you're all playing Lawful Good Crusaders of Glory, there's that One Guy who refuses to allow even the slightest injustice, and demands that the party go haring off to right any wrongs that are so much as mentioned. Or who really gloms on to the idea of "lawful" and insists on an exhaustive discussion of applicable legal codes before the party can take action.

kaisel
10-21-2011, 11:56 AM
Overly antagonistic characters are a problem regardless of morality system. Even if you're all playing Lawful Good Crusaders of Glory, there's that One Guy who refuses to allow even the slightest injustice, and demands that the party go haring off to right any wrongs that are so much as mentioned. Or who really gloms on to the idea of "lawful" and insists on an exhaustive discussion of applicable legal codes before the party can take action.

Oh yeah, most definitely, luckily I haven't had to deal with that side of things, since trying to play a kinda good character in my group is much like pulling teeth. Which is why I tend to prefer DMing to playing at the moment because playing as an immoral jackass for months on end isn't really my cup of tea. But yeah, that One Guy who stalls the game is never fun, no matter how or why he's stalling the game.

Comb Stranger
10-21-2011, 01:18 PM
I never play evil characters, but I do have extremely malleable conscience. It comes in handy!

We once wound up between a city of dwarves and an angry LG god. The city was infested by the cursed bloodline of an evil douche-king, and the god was willing to raze the entire city to destroy them. The only thing we could do to save the innocent percentage was a pretty horrifying compromise; going through my contacts and calling in the Hellknights for some, lets be honest, ethnic cleansing. It was horrible, but we managed to save thousands from imminent holy fire.