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Shagohod
06-06-2012, 08:49 AM
I've only ever read Fahrenheit 451 from his output, and even just reading that shows how important he was to science fiction.

Another great one lost.

The Raider Dr. Jones
06-06-2012, 09:00 AM
My mom was a fan back in the '60s, she was a big one for Dandelion Wine.

She liked to tell a story of going to see him speak at the University of Utah. He started out pretty stiff, drank steadily through the evening, and was remarkably entertaining by the end.

I still haven't read a lot of his stories, but I remember really liking "There Will Come Soft Rains" from the Martian Chronicles.

Nyarlathotep
06-06-2012, 09:59 AM
This is a real bummer. Fahrenheit and some of his other stories are what got me into reading and writing when I was a kid. He's one of the best children's/young adult authors whose books can still be entertaining for an adult.

Loki
06-06-2012, 10:26 AM
Oh shit. Oh no. Oh shit.

Damn. Double damn.

...


fuck I'm tearing up here.

gahitsu
06-06-2012, 10:41 AM
It's very sad, but he lived to be 91 and, as someone pointed out on twitter, will continue to outlive us all.

I liked a lot of his works but "Homecoming" shaped a lot of my tastes as a reader and who I am as a writer today.

Karzac
06-06-2012, 10:46 AM
I've only read Fahrenheit 451 and a couple short stories, but I really enjoyed them. He had one of the strongest voices of any author I've read.

Dizzy
06-06-2012, 10:47 AM
Libation for my homie:

http://i.imgur.com/6NKGK.gif?1

Patrick
06-06-2012, 10:53 AM
Bradbury was a good dude. RIP.

Kirin
06-06-2012, 11:01 AM
Yeah, I can't say I've read him recently, but I definitely enjoyed a bunch of his work when I was younger. Cheers for a life well-lived.

Issun
06-06-2012, 11:02 AM
It's very sad, but he lived to be 91 and, as someone pointed out on twitter, will continue to outlive us all.

I guess that pretty much sums it up.

Little Sampson
06-06-2012, 11:06 AM
In ninth grade I devoured everything Bradbury ever wrote and loved every bit of it. Looking back, I recognize that not everything was gold like I thought, but it played a major, major part in me wanting to write.

I'm just glad he got to live a full (age-wise) life.

tungwene
06-06-2012, 11:06 AM
I don't think I've read anything by him past my high school years which makes me sad to think how big a part of my life his writing used to be but not more recently. I should remedy that.

Loki
06-06-2012, 11:25 AM
Bradbury was a gigantic part of my childhood and adolescence and a huge influence. The Halloween Tree remains my most cherished and reread book to this day. His output was staggering in both quantity and quality. His legacy and the impact he had on countless writers may be immeasurable, but I can't help but feel that the world is a poorer place for his passing. He is deeply missed.

upupdowndown
06-06-2012, 11:26 AM
It's very sad, but he lived to be 91 and, as someone pointed out on twitter, will continue to outlive us all.

Yeah, Bradbury had a really full life. He figured out early what his passion was and then he did it and made a living out of it for pretty much his entire life, and lived to be lionized as a legend of the field.

Sprite
06-06-2012, 11:58 AM
I liked his books. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1IxOS4VzKM)

Evil Dead Junkie
06-06-2012, 12:09 PM
I feel genuinely terrible about this. He was one of those guys I thought would find a way to live forever. I had two chances to meet him and missed both.

Well let's let him have the final word...

"As for my gravestone? I would like to borrow that great barber pole from out front of the town shoppe and have it ruin at midnight if you happened to drop by my mound to say hello. And there the old barber pole would be, lit, its bright ribbons twining up out of mystery, turning, and twining away up into further mysteries, forever. And if you come to visit, leave an apple for my ghost."

Loki
06-06-2012, 12:12 PM
One of the better remembrances I've seen todays is from the AVClub, of all places.

http://www.avclub.com/articles/rip-ray-bradbury,79799/

Mara
06-06-2012, 12:28 PM
RIP. He was a great author and I have a huge amount of respect for him and his work.

Healy
06-06-2012, 05:32 PM
RIP, Ray Bradbury. I read a bunch of his short stories in middle and high school. There's this one story in particular that's stuck with me, where this kid is completely isolated from the rest of the world, and his mom is grooming him to be his dad (who died a long time before the story began), and also she's kinda crazy.

I remember the very end of the story, where the kid finally gets out, and all the while he's yelling "I'm dead! I'm dead!" which freaks out a couple of cops. Does anyone remember the name of this story? I'm drawing a blank, and I'd really like to read it again.

Paul le Fou
06-06-2012, 06:03 PM
I never read him beyond Fahrenheit 451, but I always intended to. Guess this is my chance, to pay homage. Where should I start?

keele864
06-06-2012, 06:04 PM
RIP, Ray Bradbury. I read a bunch of his short stories in middle and high school. There's this one story in particular that's stuck with me, where this kid is completely isolated from the rest of the world, and his mom is grooming him to be his dad (who died a long time before the story began), and also she's kinda crazy.

I remember the very end of the story, where the kid finally gets out, and all the while he's yelling "I'm dead! I'm dead!" which freaks out a couple of cops. Does anyone remember the name of this story? I'm drawing a blank, and I'd really like to read it again.

"Jack-in-the-Box" from The October Country

Loki
06-06-2012, 06:55 PM
I never read him beyond Fahrenheit 451, but I always intended to. Guess this is my chance, to pay homage. Where should I start?

You really can't go wrong. Nich mentioned the most prominent works but any of the short story collections are going to have a wealth of treasures. Also Dandelion Wine is perhaps the most beautiful thing he ever wrote (and that's saying something). Also The Halloween Tree but you really should wait until October.

Matchstick
06-06-2012, 07:23 PM
I liked a lot of his works but "Homecoming" shaped a lot of my tastes as a reader and who I am as a writer today.

You are good people. I've read a lot of his stuff and The October Country is my favorite overall. I'm sure some of it is sentimental, because it was also a big favorite of my dad. Check it out (off the top of my head): Homecoming, Uncle Einar, The Scythe, The Wind, the aforementioned Jack-in-the-Box, The Crowd - so many great stories. The other bit of his writing that I totally loved was from Dandelion Wine where they try remodeling his grandmother's kitchen. He was a giant of American literature, IMO.

ThricebornPhoenix
06-06-2012, 08:04 PM
The Illustrated Man, The Martian Chronicles, and Something Wicked This Way Comes.
Also, The Toynbee Convector is probably my favorite short story, though the collection is not so good overall.

Tavir
06-06-2012, 08:20 PM
Sad news, I'll always remember his short story "All Summer in a Day" (http://www.dodea.edu/instruction/curriculum/lars/ela_lab/PreK-Grade6/Docs/AllSummerinaDay.doc)*. I read it in middle school and I think I hadn't read anything as profoundly sad as that in my life up to that point, and probably shaped my outlook on how to treat people in life.

* opens in .doc file, sorry, only format I could find it in.

Sheana
06-06-2012, 08:54 PM
We should all live to be 91 and as influential as him. RIP to an amazing author.

Fahrenheit 451 was, strangely, one of my "comfort food" books growing up. One of those books that just got picked up and read over and over again when I got the craving. Something Wicked This Way Comes was the other huge one for me; we watched the movie in class one day and something about it just really stuck in my mind and lingered for a long while. Then I checked the book out of the library and devoured it.

Man, I remember reading so many short stories of his in class, too, actually. Science fiction (or just fiction of a particular sort, since Mr. Bradbury wasn't fond of the term, heh) was such a controversial one to so many people, still is, and to have so much of it taught in school as thoughtful, meaningful literature was such a great thing.

ThricebornPhoenix
06-06-2012, 09:34 PM
Hey, he asked where to start, not "what Bradbury books should I read."
Well, the answer to the latter question is probably "all of them", although I can't be sure since I haven't read all of them myself, yet.

Healy
06-06-2012, 09:48 PM
"Jack-in-the-Box" from The October Country

Thank you. I googled the name of the story, and apparently some dudes made a short film based on it. I should see if it's on Youtube sometime.

ajr82
06-06-2012, 09:55 PM
Sorry to say, I tried to read Fahrenheit 451 for the first time a few years ago, and I just couldn't stand it.

The Martian Chronicles, though, that's a book I love.

Evil Dead Junkie
06-06-2012, 10:24 PM
My personal Bradbury favorites include but are by no means limited to; Usher II, There Will Come Soft Rains, The Veldt, Small Assassin, The Next In Line, The Jar, etc. etc. etc.

As terrible as it is to say I have to think the one good thing that might come from his death is Dark Carnival might finally get released in an edition that does not require a second mortgage to buy.

Ghost from Spelunker
06-06-2012, 10:30 PM
I got to see Ray Bradbury give a speech in high school. He seemed like a pretty swell guy. The story I remember most was when he said he had a comic book collection and his friends gave him a hard time over it. He got different friends. His exact words were "to hell with them!"

He had such a powerful voice too. I think he was the narrator for "The Halloween Tree" when they animated it.

Evil Dead Junkie
06-06-2012, 10:31 PM
Here it is.

"I learned that I was right and everyone else was wrong when I was nine. Buck Rogers arrived on the scene that year, and it was instant love. I collected the daily strips, and was madness maddened by them. Friends criticized. Friends made fun. I tore up the Buck Rogers strips. For a month I walked through my fourth-grade classes, stunned and empty. One day I burst into tears, wondering what devastation had happened to me. The answer was: Buck Rogers. He was gone, and life simply wasn't worth living. The next thought was: Those are not my friends, the ones who got me to tear the strips apart and so tear my own life down the middle; they are my enemies.

I went back to collecting Buck Rogers. My life has been happy ever since. For that was the beginning of my writing science fiction. Since then, I never listened to anyone who criticized my taste in space travel, sideshows, or gorillas. When this occurs, I pack up my dinosaurs and leave the room."

- Ray Bradbury

Evil Dead Junkie
06-07-2012, 11:40 AM
Neil Gaiman is really good at obituaries. (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jun/06/ray-bradbury-neil-gaiman-appreciation)

Brickroad
06-07-2012, 01:59 PM
I am ashamed at how little Bradbury I've read. Just Fahrenheit 451, The Halloween Tree and a smattering of short stories here and there. I really need to fix that.

elementalpenguin
06-07-2012, 02:47 PM
I've only read Fahrenheit 451 and some of his short stories, but my mom sat me down one day when I was 10 or something and made me read Fahrenheit 451, and it's lived on my bedside table ever since. Rest in peace.

Alex Scott
06-07-2012, 11:00 PM
Bradbury was probably my first favorite author, ever since I found The Illustrated Man on a school reading list. After that, I went after some of his short story collections, and my parents' old copy of Something Wicked... Somehow, I never got around to reading Fahrenheit 451; I started it today, and I'm sorry I didn't.

I've always admired him as a stylist. He wrote prose you could taste.

I get the feeling Deep South Con is going to be full of Bradbury reminisces when I get there.

shivam
06-08-2012, 01:16 PM
Ray Bradbury did nothing for me as a writer, but he greatly influenced a bunch of my favorite authors, and for that I thank him.

keele864
06-08-2012, 07:31 PM
My personal Bradbury favorites include but are by no means limited to; Usher II, There Will Come Soft Rains, The Veldt, Small Assassin, The Next In Line, The Jar, etc. etc. etc.

As terrible as it is to say I have to think the one good thing that might come from his death is Dark Carnival might finally get released in an edition that does not require a second mortgage to buy.

Your favorites look a lot like my favorites, especially "Usher II", "There Will Come Soft Rains", and "The Next in Line". That "etc., etc." covers a lot, doesn't it? To think that Bradbury also wrote "Homecoming", "The Lake", "Kaleidoscope", "A Sound of Thunder", and "The Scythe". Are there any other sf authors who wrote so many A-list stories?

And I'm sure there are dozens of great stories that get lost in the shuffle Look at all those later collections like Driving Blind, One More for the Road, The Cat's Pajama's, and We'll Always Have Paris. I've read some of the stories from those collections and they're not as consistently great as The October Country or The Martian Chronicles, but there are still really memorable tales.

Imagine pop culture without Bradbury. Without "The Fog Horn" we wouldn't have The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, so we wouldn't have Godzilla, so we wouldn't have so very many things.

(Without the example butterfly from "A Sound of Thunder" would I be playing this mental game? Somehow I doubt it.)

gahitsu
06-08-2012, 09:06 PM
Neil Gaiman is really good at obituaries. (http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jun/06/ray-bradbury-neil-gaiman-appreciation)

He really can. That obituary gave me shivers.

Also, ' "Looking back over a lifetime, you see that love was the answer to everything," Ray said once, in an interview. ' ... oh lord. Something's in my eye.