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View Full Version : On the Back of Great A'Tuin: Talking About Discworld


teg
12-18-2012, 04:11 PM
bringing the nerd singularity that is talking time full circle

So lately I've been getting back into Discworld after a brief interest a few years back when I picked up The Colour of Magic and a few other loose books. I keep finding cheap copies of different entries at a used book store here, so I've been going through the series at a rate of one book every month or so, all out of order and in completely different print formats. This seems incredibly appropriate for Discworld. Right now I'm just finishing up Witches Abroad and thinking of getting Maskerade next. I've had a lot of fun with the Samuel Vimes and the City Watch books (I've read Thud!, Night Watch, and Guards! Guards!), but Soul Music has been a real standout, too. Any favourites from any other Tyrants?

fugu13
12-18-2012, 04:23 PM
The Tiffany Aching books are some of the best (and I firmly believe the Discworld novels are overall some of the best literature anywhere), despite being billed as children's books. The great brilliance of Pratchett in selling them is that all he had to do was write exactly the same sorts of novels but with a younger protagonist and add in a few subtle allusions to child interpretations of swear words and he'd be able to sell them as children's books.

I'm also a big fan of the Vimes novels. Hogfather is one of my favorites, as is Small Gods, both for the depth of their insight. Going Postal is a really solid new direction, but read it after The Truth. If you liked Soul Music, read Mort and then read the rest of the Death books. Lots more thoughts, but that's plenty to start.

Falselogic
12-18-2012, 04:25 PM
I've been reading them in order now and just finished up Guards, Guards! I've enjoyed all of them so for, but especially enjoyed Sourcery and Wyrd Sisters

Loki
12-18-2012, 04:34 PM
One of my favorites was Thief of Time I found it really moving when it first came out. It's been a few years since I last read it though so maybe not. Night Watch is rather brilliant. I like Monstrous Regiment more than most people seem to though I agree it gets rather noodly at the end.

Karrius
12-18-2012, 05:46 PM
Favorite books:

The entire night watch series, read in order. I have special fondness for The Fifth Element, which most people don't seem to like as much.

The Truth. Maybe my favorite discworld novel, if not for...

Small Gods. The best. The perfect stand alone.

Really, they're all wonderful.

teg
12-18-2012, 06:03 PM
Oh, also, this may be sharing something everyone already knew about, buuuuuut:

The Annotated Pratchett File, v9.0 (http://www.lspace.org/books/apf/index.html)

A fan-made set of annotations for every Terry Pratchett book. As far as I can tell it's been floating around since the days of usenet, with new segments appended on when appropriate. It's incredibly useful as a companion piece when reading any of the Discworld novels. I refer to it constantly.

Büge
12-18-2012, 07:00 PM
Dudes, we already had a Pratchett thread (http://www.talking-time.net/showthread.php?t=9670).

teg
12-18-2012, 07:05 PM
Aw nuts. I searched the forum all about, but there found nothing

Torzelbaum
12-18-2012, 07:18 PM
Dudes, we already had a Pratchett thread (http://www.talking-time.net/showthread.php?t=9670).That's the right leg of the trousers of time. This is the left. (Or maybe vice versa - I'm not entirely sure either way.)

Daikaiju
12-21-2012, 12:05 PM
My wheelhouse. You are all up INS.

Daikaiju
06-16-2013, 07:19 AM
Odd note. Rincewind is one of the possible judges on Midway's Circus Voltaire table.

Daikaiju
07-07-2013, 08:42 AM
Just bought Nanny Ogg's Cookbook off iBooks. Leonard Of Quirm's grilled cheese sandwich is a revelation.

Büge
07-07-2013, 11:33 AM
Leonard Of Quirm's grilled cheese sandwich is a revelation.

I made one of those last night. The recipe is hard, but the end product is all worth it.

Falselogic
10-07-2013, 10:50 AM
I finished Eric awhile back... That is a really short book. I'm nearly done with Moving Pictures right now.

I can't decide whether Pratchett really likes Hollywood or really hates it.

Falselogic
10-07-2013, 11:47 AM
"It's a Holy wood monster! From film land!"

Sven
10-07-2013, 03:30 PM
Dudes, we already had a Pratchett thread (http://www.talking-time.net/showthread.php?t=9670).

To be fair, that thing's (a) in the wrong forum and (b) old enough that I started it.

Anyway, I really like Terry's (for lack of a better classification) Big Ideas books. The Truth deals with newspapers and media, Going Postal is about the role of the post office in modern society, and Making Money is like porn for economic geeks. The next one is going to be back with Moist and the gang, this time dealing with railroads, so it's going to be another total geekfest for me. These are all really fun, since they carry on exploring the modern world through a fantasy haze.

They all kind of fit into the Vimes area since he's a regular supporting player and Vetinari's always around, but really those are sort of off in their own area now that Moist is up to a trilogy even by himself.

I didn't particularly like the most recent Vimes book, Snuff - I thought it was a fun enough idea (Vimes in the country and totally out of his element a la a classic detective story), but I like Vimes more when he's battling the maniacs around his office as much as the psychopaths of the week. Taking him away from Carrot / Nobby / Colon kind of blunts the charm. That, and the whole riverboat / slavery thing just kind of built with no real payoff.


I can't decide whether Pratchett really likes Hollywood or really hates it.

Moving Pictures is kind of a literary fantasy version of The Player, although it came out a couple of years earlier. But... 1990? That seems about right for the "everyone in Hollywood is insane" meme to find it's way to his desk.

Falselogic
10-07-2013, 03:33 PM
I'm doing them in order, so Reaper Man is next

Wolfgang
10-09-2013, 08:57 PM
Anybody heard any news on that AMPD tv series?

Daikaiju
10-11-2013, 05:42 AM
Not since last year. It's maddening.

Zef
12-19-2013, 06:14 PM
So I just finished Night Watch (Jesus :eek:) and, before moving on to Monstrous Regiment this weekend, I glanced at the list of published books to confirm that there's now no gaps in my Discworld reading :D But I also realized something: is Carpe Jugulum the last Witches book in the main Discworld line? I love the Watch and all (as Pratchett evidently does) but should I start looking into the Young Adult Tiffany Aching series for my Weatherwax fix?

fugu13
12-19-2013, 06:37 PM
Yes. The Tiffany Aching books are Pratchett at his best. They're fantastic -- he just told stories about a young person, from the perspective of a young person portrayed realistically, with basically no other accomodations to his usual style for the age of the reader. Which is perfect.

Wolfgang
12-19-2013, 08:27 PM
Also, the second and third books are seriously great Witches books - where the first has Granny and Nanny cameos, they're main characters in the next two.

Daneno
01-11-2014, 08:13 PM
So I was at the book store and all of a sudden... New Discworld! I don't pay attention for a few months and new books just coalesce from the aether.

I could get used to this.

Daikaiju
01-12-2014, 05:26 AM
Is it out?

*googles*

yessssssssssssssssss

Wolfgang
01-12-2014, 10:57 AM
So I was at the book store and all of a sudden... New Discworld! I don't pay attention for a few months and new books just coalesce from the aether.

I could get used to this.

I just started reading that last night, whaddya know

Octopus Prime
01-12-2014, 11:16 AM
I just picked it up, but I'm in the middle of a different Pratchett book so I must be patient.

I don't WANT to be patient, but I will!

Zef
01-12-2014, 02:15 PM
I'm about a fourth, maybe 2/5ths into Monstrous Regiment, and I still have to start on the earlier Moist von Lipwig books, the next Watch ones, and Academicals, so I'm quite a ways from Raising any sort of Steam. Especially if I add the Tiffany Aching ones to my list.

Speaking of Regiment... I dunno, maybe it's because I plunged into it practically on the same day I finished Night Watch, but I'm still not feeling it. Everything's right there --the characters are excellent, the subject's awesome, Pratchett's research and attention to detail are, as always, exquisite, and the humor is really good considering the sombre atmosphere and setting. But... it hasn't quite gripped me the way other Discworld books have, especially not Night Watch.

Of course, the same thing happened when I first read Reaper Man, and when I reread that two years ago I was enthralled, so maybe this is just not the right "moment" for this book.

Loki
01-12-2014, 03:12 PM
Add Tiffany Aching to your list.

Droewyn
01-12-2014, 04:42 PM
Add Tiffany Aching to your list.

Wolfgang
01-12-2014, 06:00 PM
Add Tiffany Aching to your list.

Holy shit do this, they get exponentially better as they go

Daikaiju
01-13-2014, 11:35 AM
Seconded.
Motion carried.
GET DEM BOOKS.

periodical
01-13-2014, 01:14 PM
I'm about to finish Long Earth and while I liked it, no characters were really as endearing as any of the discworld MCs. I'll probably wait a bit before trying the sequel.

Falselogic
04-03-2014, 10:39 AM
Witches Abroad is my favorite Discworld story so far. I seem to have a soft spot for Granny and Nanny. Almost done with it and then its on to Small Gods... which I'm told is really really good.

Zef
04-03-2014, 11:01 AM
It is. It's not the funniest or the most exciting, but Pratchett Talks Religion is still one of my favorite Discworld books, and a very important book in general.

Incidentally, I misplaced my Monstrous Regiment, which is really terrible because the second half was absolutely perfect :( It was also very fortunate that I read it after The Truth (which I almost didn't) because of Otto and William's appearances. However, I'm now deep into Going Postal, and... is it me, or is the writing style noticeably different from its immediate predecessors?

Wolfgang
04-03-2014, 03:23 PM
I'm pretty sure that's around the time Pratchett started using a writing assistant because of his condition...? I could be wrong about the specifics but he's been more or less collaborating on his books for the last handful of them.

Falselogic
04-10-2014, 11:01 PM
Finished Small Gods. Different, more thoughtful, than the other books so far. And I think all of them have been thoughtful!

I really enjoyed it. I'm up for talking about ideas in it if anyone else is.

Daikaiju
04-11-2014, 08:29 AM
Oh Small Gods is one of my top faves along with Hogswatch. What did you want to talk about?

Falselogic
04-11-2014, 08:33 AM
The tortoise as a symbol of Jesus of Nazareth or Vishnu, the idea that gods need people not vice-versa, those sort of things.

Daikaiju
04-11-2014, 09:07 AM
I think the larger issue being presented was that institutions, be they religions, government or armies, need to remember they exist to serve, not be served.

Zef
04-14-2014, 02:00 PM
Yep, that was my main takeaway. The quote that goes:

"Around the god there forms a shell of prayers and ceremonies and buildings and priests and authority, until at last the god dies. And this may not be noticed."

...should be branded in flaming letters at the door of any church, temple, mosque, chapel, synagogue, or prayer room ever, to remind us all what religion, organized or otherwise, should really be about.

Hell, while I'm at it, these other brilliant quotes from the book:

“Just because you can explain it doesn't mean it's not still a miracle.”

“Humans! They lived in a world where the grass continued to be green and the sun rose every day and flowers regularly turned into fruit, and what impressed them? Weeping statues. And wine made out of water! A mere quantum-mechanistic tunnel effect, that'd happen anyway if you were prepared to wait zillions of years. As if the turning of sunlight into wine, by means of vines and grapes and time and enzymes, wasn't a thousand times more impressive and happened all the time...”

And the brilliant part is that the second actually comes from the actual god in the story! Considering that Pratchett is, IIRC, atheist, it's absolute genius that his treatise on religion is actually a condemnation of humanity's approach to it, rather than of our belief in the divine.

dtsund
04-18-2014, 02:27 AM
I'm pretty sure that's around the time Pratchett started using a writing assistant because of his condition...? I could be wrong about the specifics but he's been more or less collaborating on his books for the last handful of them.

Nah, can't be; Going Postal was ten years ago. He wasn't diagnosed until 2007. Discworld books don't usually do chapters, though.

Daikaiju
04-19-2014, 06:02 AM
Considering that Pratchett is, IIRC, atheist, it's absolute genius that his treatise on religion is actually a condemnation of humanity's approach to it, rather than of our belief in the divine.

“He knew from experience that true and obvious ideas, such as the ineffable wisdom and judgment of the Great God Om, seemed so obscure to many people that you actually had to kill them before they saw the error of their ways...”

Sven
04-25-2014, 07:16 AM
Anyone tucked into the new one yet? Admittedly, writing a Moist book about trains makes it seem that Terry's now writing with me specifically in mind, but I'm not willing to drop the $40 on the hardcover unless it comes very highly recommended.

(The premise seems like Terry played a lot of the Railroad Tycoon II campaign, specifically the infamously tough Teddy Roosevelt mission.)

Daikaiju
04-25-2014, 07:54 AM
I'm part way through it and enjoying.

Wolfgang
04-25-2014, 09:19 PM
Yeah, I liked it. Discworld is now officially Steampunk, though, if that bothers you (it doesn't bother me).

Zef
04-25-2014, 09:31 PM
Yeah, I liked it. Discworld is now officially Steampunk, though, if that bothers you (it doesn't bother me).

I'm still about five books away (give or take the Tiffany Aching ones) but I love how Ankh-Morkpork is going through a very speedy Industrial Revolution and a clockwork Information Age. The best part is how someone who can dress in a relatively modern suit...

http://i.imgur.com/Z5ahO8V.jpg

Can coexist in the same city as a bunch of Roman legionnaires, open-toe sandals and all:

http://i.imgur.com/1Ab7vE9.jpg?1

(Well, given, what, a time frame of about ten years between books?)

Wolfgang
04-25-2014, 10:03 PM
It's still a mishmash of anachronisms, but Discworld as a whole is pretty much in the Victorian era now, with outlying regions (Lancre, for example) scurrying to catch up. The last few main-series novels that have to do with modernizing industries have pushed forward the visible state of technology in the series. If you've read any of the Science of Discworld books, Unseen University is looking more like a steampunk MIT.

Octopus Prime
04-26-2014, 04:13 AM
We're only talking about Raising Steam now? I got it for Christmas, and read it then.

I tend to like Moist books a lot, and I definitely liked it more then the last couple.

Wolfgang
04-26-2014, 08:42 AM
It only came out in America really recently

Zef
04-30-2014, 09:52 PM
Finished Going Postal, and it was seriously awesome. But I did find it awkward how Pratchett built up the "living mass of letters" plot, the "avatar of the gods" part, the eldritch consciousness of the Post Office and the people it killed... and then unceremoniously got rid of all those plots via arson in order to focus on the Post/Clacks rivalry.

I mean, I loved the rivalry plot too, since its realistic, humanistic trappings are a better fit to "modern" Discworld and the magical bits felt like they belonged in an earlier book... And maybe the living letters were a bit too close to Pratchett's own L-Space and University Library, and he decided to scuttle the concept, but still, feels like an abandoned plot.

Still deciding whether to plunge ahead to Thud! next, or pick up The Folklore of Discworld, or finally get the Tiffany Aching books. Or maybe The Science of Discworld.

Adam
05-01-2014, 01:24 AM
Finished Going Postal, and it was seriously awesome. But I did find it awkward how Pratchett built up the "living mass of letters" plot, the "avatar of the gods" part, the eldritch consciousness of the Post Office and the people it killed... and then unceremoniously got rid of all those plots via arson in order to focus on the Post/Clacks rivalry.

Yeah, the "living mass of letters" "you are the chosen one" scene is actually kind of embarrassing to read, and not even worth it in any way due to what you just said.

Octopus Prime
05-01-2014, 06:58 AM
One of my favorite parts of Going Postal was that things were getting so... mythical about a job as mundane as post-master.

Wolfgang
05-01-2014, 07:07 AM
One of my favorite parts of Going Postal was that things were getting so... mythical about a job as mundane as post-master.

This is actually what makes a Discworld novel: imparting fantastical gravitas to mundane situations and taking it out of places you'd expect it (witches/wizards)

Zef
05-01-2014, 07:32 AM
Yeah, the "initiation ceremony" where he became the old postmen's Chosen One was fine, especially since the golems were put through the same process. But the part where the letters literally plucked him off the ground and spun him while chanting at him, making him their mystical Chosen One, was completely unlike anything in the series since that one Octavo spell leapt into Rincewind's head. So I was intrigued to see how that enormous, unsolvable task would get resolved... (And I was also rather looking forward to seeing the golems, who could find anyone, anywhere, and don't need to sleep or rest --save for once a week-- go about distributing that mass of letters, come rain, snow, or glom of nit. :p) But then it was solved by fire, and the consciousness of the letters was "fridged", for lack of a better term, simply to give Moist more motivation than he already had to take down Gilt. Even the "avatar" bit that drove Moist to take his job seriously was ultimately unnecessary to him as a character, since he antagonized Gilt more on his personal values and his relationships with other people than the "killing" of the letters or even his attempted murder.

Unrelated, but I could swear that the "pipe organ that was turned into a mail sorter" with components "where pi was exactly 3" was mentioned in one of the early books as a minor gag, as one of the many instances of BS Johnson's expertise, but there are so many of these scattered across the series that damned if I could remember which book had it.

ThricebornPhoenix
05-01-2014, 08:27 AM
Even the "avatar" bit that drove Moist to take his job seriously was ultimately unnecessary to him as a character
I have a weak memory for fine details, but I'm pretty sure that was what set him on the path to righteousness usefulness to society. It didn't need to manifest again because there were other forces pushing him back if he strayed too far, but he would never have really gone that way without it.

Sven
05-07-2014, 08:22 AM
Finished it off on the train in this morning. I thought it was rather flat overall; Moist's scheme for avoiding the bridge issue wasn't as clever as we've come to expect out of him, and TP didn't really take advantage of being able to bounce Moist off Vimes as much as he could have.

The technical / railroad stuff was all quite neat, especially the bit in Quirm. But the main plot didn't have much to it, since the coup / extremist aspect was downplayed.

(I liked how they explicitly had Vetinari recall that someone already came up with a steam engine before, in one of those typically Pratchett moments where he threw out an idea as a one-off joke back in the old days, and then realised it would make a hell of a full novel later down the road.)

I could've done without explicitly making Iron Girder into a mystical object, although I suppose that could easily be interpreted as metaphor on Moist's part.

So, overall good, if a little underwhelming (and certainly my least favourite of the books dating back to... I guess Monstrous Regiment?). I'm not sure what's left to use in the Moist (and William)-as-drivers-of-societal-progress line of books, though.

jpfriction
08-11-2014, 08:07 AM
After I finished Raising Steam I decided to revisit the older books, starting with Guards! Guards. Man did Pratchett ever have a way with words in the early books. I'm on page 12 and I'm already chuckling like an idiot.

R^2
08-11-2014, 08:45 AM
I just finished Unseen Academicals, and wow.

This isn't just bad for Pratchett. It's plain bad.

It might as well have been called "Discworld Callbacks: Also Some Football References". I realize Ankh-Morpork's a big place full of established characters, but trying to cram every one of them in as a cameo really bogs down the narrative. This isn't to mention the abandoned plot threads -- what happened to the Furies? -- and that Nutt is an even worse Mary Sue than late-career Esmerelda Weatherwax ever was.

It's just... not punchy, certainly not like you're used to from Pratchett. One of the better callback jokes in the book is when Archchancellor Ridcully and the former Dean get into a big argument. After the situation is calmly defused, a background character notices Rincewind pulling his sock back on.

Left as is, that'd be an absurd situation that draws meaning and its humor from Rincewind's previous adventures. I feel like in an earlier book, that would have been that, leaving the reader to connect the dots. Instead, there's two or three paragraphs going "Hey guys remember the end of Sourcery? It's probably the same sock lol". It comes off as clunky, inelegant, and overexplained.

I'm starting to feel like I'd be better off skipping the rest of the late Discworld books. Wintersmith was the last one I think I really enjoyed.

Zef
08-11-2014, 09:09 AM
The latest DW book I've read is still Going Postal, which, as I mentioned above, felt oddly disjointed with its "avatar" plotline. As such, I think the last "funny" Discworld book I read was, by publication history, Thief of Time, or The Truth going by my reading order (though I did reread Witches Abroad last month and I was so happy with it). Night Watch was gorgeous, albeit somber, and Monstrous Regiment tried so hard to interject humorous bits in a relentlessly oppressive, gloomy story that I didn't have fun reading it until near the end.

And apparently Thud! is dark and grim too? It's next on my list.

Maybe Unseen Academicals is an attempt to recapture the humorous satire that first birthed Discworld, going as far as to make it a Rincewind/Wizards book? I can understand if forced comedy fails, but it it comes as a palate cleanser after a bunch of cynical books I can be more forgiving of it.

Adam
08-11-2014, 10:43 AM
I think the downslope of the Discworld can be traced to how much each individual book's Igor has been shoehorned into the narrative. (Replace "Igor" with "The Luggage" or "The Librarian" if you want to be nasty)

ThricebornPhoenix
08-11-2014, 10:46 AM
late-career Esmerelda Weatherwax
You mean the woman who saved a life by intimidating the anthropomorphic personification of the concept of death DEATH with a scowl?

Sven
08-28-2014, 07:07 AM
And apparently Thud! is dark and grim too? It's next on my list.

Maybe Unseen Academicals is an attempt to recapture the humorous satire that first birthed Discworld, going as far as to make it a Rincewind/Wizards book? I can understand if forced comedy fails, but it it comes as a palate cleanser after a bunch of cynical books I can be more forgiving of it.

Thud's not so much dark and grim as it is a chuckling tribute to a genre that's inherently dark and grim (the "cop goes on vacation, falls into murder investigation" story). But there's a whole whack of stuff in there about slavery and civil rights that feels particularly anvilicious.

I get what Terry was going for with UA, but it just took too much setup to get to where things were going. It reads a lot like an inferior version of Moving Pictures, right down to the main character you know isn't ever going to show up again, the peripheral involvement of the Wizards, and the general disconnect with the now-"mainline" Vimes / Moist stories. It's almost self-consciously saying "okay, I know I've left this type of stuff behind, but I'm going to be done with all of this soon so have a callback before I go back to contemplating monetary theory and right-of-way disputes."

Octopus Prime
08-28-2014, 07:17 AM
That's Snuff, not Thud. Thuds the one where they wind up resolving the Troll/Dwarf conflict by learning that the battle they were obsessing over didn't occur.

It also features Vimes getting possessed by the spirit of vengeance and wreaking bloody havoc while quoting a children's picture book.

Sven
09-02-2014, 01:01 PM
That's Snuff, not Thud. Thuds the one where they wind up resolving the Troll/Dwarf conflict by learning that the battle they were obsessing over didn't occur.

It also features Vimes getting possessed by the spirit of vengeance and wreaking bloody havoc while quoting a children's picture book.

Ah, right. Enough with the un-descriptive onomatopoeiac titles already, Terry.

(Yes, I know there's in-universe references to both of those, but they're damned hard to keep straight)

Zef
10-15-2014, 12:54 PM
Thud! is being difficult with me.

On the one hand, the Vimes side is being absurdly and stupendously awesome, with finely-tuned narrative, perfect prose, and just the right balance of humor and (ahem) darkness. It's so much better than Going Postal and more involving than Monstrous Regiment. (Which just goes to show how Pratchett seems to be much more comfortable writing Watch novels than any other type.)

On the other, the Angua/Sally side is exceedingly problematic, what with half of their page-time having them naked for no reason other than fanservice, their (otherwise interesting) investigation getting bogged down in a mental catfight over Carrot (and said investigation getting taken over by the male officers anyway), and, in the last bit I read, the narration of their "girls' night out" outright sniggering at the "beautiful airhead" who's too "dumb" to realize she's out of Nobby's league.

This is the very first time I've run into out-and-out fanservice in a Discworld book without it being called out, and it's weird.

taosterman
01-08-2015, 01:08 PM
I've been getting into these books lately, and honestly they're among the only fantasy I can do anymore, besides the Locke Lamora books. And I'm realizing that, for all my cartography love, it's because there's deliberately no map. So many fantasy books use maps in a way that limits the imagination and results in stories where characters walk from one place to another for chapters on end, so desperate is the creator to build his/her world piecemeal. Discworld fills out its world purely through ideas, concepts and characters, and feels all the more real to me as a result.

Anyway, I'm not saying all other fantasy shares the same problems, but that's particularly why this series is scratching my itch right now. I read The Truth a long time ago, recently read Small Gods and am in the middle of Guards! Guards! The latter two have been the best, but at the time I appreciated Truth as someone in the copy editing trenches.

Falselogic
03-12-2015, 09:35 AM
Terry Prachett died (http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-31858156)

Octopus Prime
03-12-2015, 09:37 AM
But...

I don't want him to...

Büge
03-12-2015, 09:47 AM
He shook his head. “There’s no justice.”
Death sighed. No, he said, ...there’s just me.

:(

Zef
03-12-2015, 10:50 AM
I had just finished Snuff last week and was in the opening pages of Unseen Academicals this morning.

:(

masterthes
03-12-2015, 11:08 AM
Goddamnit that sucks :(

masterthes
03-12-2015, 11:22 AM
So, now I'm conflicted if I want to binge read the rest of Discworld, or just take my time as usual

upupdowndown
03-12-2015, 11:31 AM
I knew this was coming.

I knew.

I'm not ready for this. with whom do I file a complaint

Sven
03-12-2015, 11:42 AM
I knew this was coming.

I knew.

I'm not ready for this. with whom do I file a complaint

I think my reaction was a resigned sigh and little else.

We all knew. Honestly, part of me is glad that it happened the way it did; his final book was wrapped up last summer, and he didn't suffer for too long beyond that.

jpfriction
03-12-2015, 11:49 AM
I think my reaction was a resigned sigh and little else.

We all knew. Honestly, part of me is glad that it happened the way it did; his final book was wrapped up last summer, and he didn't suffer for too long beyond that.

Yep, well put. Taken before his time but still, what an amazing body of work he managed to complete while he was with us. I'm looking forward to sharing his books with my children one day.

Octopus Prime
03-12-2015, 12:02 PM
Long Mars isn't really the book I would have hoped to have been his last, if I had any say in the matter, but I'm also not so sure he had much of a hand in it either.

Zef
03-12-2015, 12:03 PM
I'm still crying at my desk. The Tweet from Death absolutely destroyed me.

masterthes
03-12-2015, 12:20 PM
Long Mars isn't really the book I would have hoped to have been his last, if I had any say in the matter, but I'm also not so sure he had much of a hand in it either.

Raising Steam was his last I believe (a Discworld book, fittingly enough)

Octopus Prime
03-12-2015, 12:25 PM
Raising Steam came out the year beforehand. Long Mars was a collaboration with Stephen Baxter, but it came out this past summer.

Unless he had another story or two written but unpublished, that'd be the last one.

Sven
03-12-2015, 12:49 PM
Long Mars isn't really the book I would have hoped to have been his last, if I had any say in the matter

Maybe he'll be like Tupac and put out more stuff after he "died"* than when he was alive. We can only hope.

* - Tupac's still alive. We all know it.

Vaeran
03-12-2015, 01:07 PM
God damn it, 2015.

Egarwaen
03-12-2015, 01:19 PM
:( For the past twenty years, I've gotten a new Terry Pratchett book from my parents for Christmas every year.

Daikaiju
03-12-2015, 01:23 PM
I knew this was coming.

I knew.

I'm not ready for this. with whom do I file a complaint

None of were.

Maybe write the Disc's Death?

Egarwaen
03-12-2015, 01:25 PM
Looks like the last one will be out this September (http://www.paulkidby.net/index.php/blog/previous/221-february-6th-2015-so-far-so-good).

One more?

And it's a Tiffany Aching novel?

Now I'm really crying. I love the Tiffany Aching books.

Tanto
03-12-2015, 04:03 PM
This sucks.

Evil Dead Junkie
03-12-2015, 04:46 PM
WHAT IS THAT SENSE INSIDE YOUR HEAD OF WISTFUL REGRET THAT THINGS ARE THE WAY THEY APPARENTLY ARE?

"Sadness, master. I think. Now-"

I AM SADNESS

GoggleBob
03-12-2015, 05:46 PM
"In the Ramtops village where they dance the real Morris dance, for example, they believe that no-one is finally dead until the ripples they cause in the world die away - until the clock he wound up winds down, until the wine she made has finished its ferment, until the crop they planted is harvested. The span of someone's life, they say, is only the core of their actual existence."

Can we just make this the Pratchett quote thread now? I think that's going to make me feel marginally better.

SQUEAK

Heron
03-12-2015, 06:44 PM
I like that quote.

I just heard about this and immediately bought two Discworld books. I'm going to try to read more often again, especially his works.

Daikaiju
03-12-2015, 06:51 PM
From the Discworld Emporium (http://www.discworldemporium.com/a%20message%20from%20the%20heart)

It was a revelation the way he could sprinkle stardust on a sentence and make it shine or take the germ of an idea, hold it up to the light, and within minutes polish it into something original, clever and very funny. We shall miss his many phone calls requesting information about police procedure, and latterly the location of a particular town, or the landscape of a train journey.

Torzelbaum
03-12-2015, 07:02 PM
Arggh... They say February is the cruelest month but this March has been crueler.

LORD, WE KNOW THERE IS NO GOOD ORDER EXCEPT THAT WHICH WE CREATE...
Azrael's expression did not change.
THERE IS NO HOPE BUT US. THERE IS NO MERCY BUT US. THERE IS NO JUSTICE. THERE IS JUST US.
The dark, sad face filled the sky.
ALL THINGS THAT ARE, ARE OURS. BUT WE MUST CARE. FOR IF WE DO NOT CARE, WE DO NOT EXIST. IF WE DO NOT EXIST, THEN THERE IS NOTHING BUT BLIND OBLIVION.
AND EVEN OBLIVION MUST END SOME DAY. LORD, WILL YOU GRANT ME JUST A LITTLE TIME? FOR THE PROPER BALANCE OF THINGS. TO RETURN WHAT WAS GIVEN. FOR THE SAKE OF PRISONERS AND THE FLIGHT OF BIRDS.
it was impossible to read expression in Azrael's features.
LORD, WHAT CAN THE HARVEST HOPE FOR, IF NOT FOR THE CARE OF THE REAPER MAN?

Zef
03-12-2015, 07:05 PM
God does not play dice with the universe: He plays an ineffable game of His own devising, which might be compared, from the perspective of any of the other players , to being involved in an obscure and complex variant of poker in a pitch-dark room, with blank cards, for infinite stakes, with a Dealer who won't tell you the rules, and who [I]smiles all the time.

Daikaiju
03-13-2015, 08:09 AM
AV Club

Terry Pratchett was fantasy fiction’s Kurt Vonnegut, not its Douglas Adams (http://www.avclub.com/article/terry-pratchett-was-fantasy-fictions-kurt-vonnegut-216514)

masterthes
03-13-2015, 08:30 AM
Great article

jpfriction
03-13-2015, 11:28 AM
AV Club

Terry Pratchett was fantasy fiction’s Kurt Vonnegut, not its Douglas Adams (http://www.avclub.com/article/terry-pratchett-was-fantasy-fictions-kurt-vonnegut-216514)

Just read that, great piece.

masterthes
03-13-2015, 11:41 AM
The Last Hero was completely fantastic

Zef
03-13-2015, 11:55 AM
The Last Hero was completely fantastic

"I have no use for people who have learned the limits of the possible."

Torzelbaum
03-13-2015, 09:04 PM
Terry Pratchett's Coat of Arms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Pratchett#Arms):
Motto : Noli Timere Messorem (Don't fear the reaper.)

Daikaiju
03-14-2015, 12:54 PM
http://i1266.photobucket.com/albums/jj537/greenhooves04/MxrYpB2_zpstpmutxru.jpg

Octopus Prime
03-26-2015, 10:11 AM
Mort is a much better Early Discworld book than I remember. I've barely started and I've already had Chuckled Warmly several times.

"My name is Mort, sir"
WHAT A COINCIDENCE



Beautiful

masterthes
03-26-2015, 11:10 AM
Mort is awesome

masterthes
04-08-2015, 07:41 AM
I wonder how come L Space has never been updated?

Thaeus
04-08-2015, 08:08 AM
Dunno, but the wiki is active. http://wiki.lspace.org/

Sven
04-10-2015, 07:49 AM
That Wiki's always struck me as being written in a very odd manner (EG going to great lengths to point out that Moist and Sacharissa aren't officially married, when... c'mon, now.).

Zef
04-10-2015, 08:56 AM
I'm taking a small break from Discworld after Unseen Academicals (because the last four books I've read have all been DW), but I still have quite a few installments left --Money, Steam, Maurice, all of Tiffany, all of Science, and now Folklore. There's also a few other non-DW Pratchetts I really need to get to or reread.

But, mostly, I'm cleansing my palate with some light fantasy (The Name of the Wind and probably The Martian afterwards) because Academicals and Snuff... didn't feel all up there with the rest of the series. Thud!, despite the problematic scenes with Angua, ended up phenomenal, but Snuff was rather like a pleasant and comfortable walk through a very familiar neighborhood, and the central plot of Academicals had very little bite to it, if any. I recognized and laughed at the criticism of foot-the-ball, especially the frustration at rules like "offside", and de Worde's excitable running commentary of the match, but having read Snuff first I found the whole Nutt plot very... redundant. Honestly, the same subject was handled much better with the goblins, and Nutt was just a hair's breadth away from being a Mary Sue (not that Vimes was any less invincible in Snuff, but at least he had decades to get there so he had earned it.)

In the end, though, the epilogue with the wizards DID feel like the absolute best cap to their particular branch of the series. Especially Ponder's last scene. Whatever the rest of the book had been, wrapping up the wizards like that got a sincere smile from me. :)

Likewise, Vetinari. After his ominous, angry appearance in Snuff, he was a blast to read in Academicals and it was nice to see Lady Margolotta in the flesh, and interacting one-on-one with him. Hopefully his last appearance in Raising Steam (I assume he's in it) will be as good a cap to his story as this one could have been.

But it makes me wonder if PTerry wrote these books with that in mind. I can think of no better way to "end" the Watch books than by allowing Sam a nice, long-deserved "holiday" (followed by a real one) where he looks back on the experiences of a lifetime and uses them to become an unstoppable force of social justice, a loving husband, and a happy father. And like I said above, for all its faults, Academicals' sendoff of the wizards was very funny and endearing. It's sad to think of PTerry as writing them knowing they would be his last, but it's also sweet to think that he loved his world so much he'd allow it to end on his terms.

Anyway, once I'm done with the break, I'll probably start with the Tiffany books before resuming the Moist ones. And the Science series also has a bit of a narrative interspersed throughout, doesn't it?

Octopus Prime
04-20-2015, 02:47 PM
After years of failure, I was finally able to get a copy of The Last Hero.

After the day I had, this will do nicely

Octopus Prime
05-06-2015, 03:50 PM
Just finished The Last Hero which, if I can be so bold as to venture an opinion before digesting the book, might be one of my favorite entries in the series.

It had the "screw it, let's go on a CRAZY ADVENTURE!!" vibe of the earlier DW books but, and this is a crucial difference, with the writing chops of the later ones.

Originally, the joke with Cohen was that he was a barbarian who was very old. Then Cohen was awesome because, traditionally, Barbarian Heroes do not get Old, and here, finally, he's incredibly bitter because Being Old is the only thing that can kill him and he can't fight back.

Additionally, it had Rincewind hanging out with Carrot on a Space Adventure. Which is precisely what this world needs.

Büge
05-06-2015, 07:48 PM
My favorite scene in The Last Hero, and, arguably, Pratchett's body of work:

A hatch opened in the strange wooden bird. It fell off and rolled a little way.
The gods saw a figure get out. He appeared, in many ways, to be a hero, except that he was far too clean.
He looked around, removed his helmet and saluted.
“Good afternoon. O mighty ones,” he said. “I do apologise, but this should not take long. And may I take this opportunity to say on behalf of the people of the Disc that you are doing a wonderful job here.” He marched towards the Horde, past the astonished gods, and stopped in front of Cohen. “Cohen the Barbarian?”
“What’s it to you?” said Cohen, mystifed.
“I am Captain Carrot of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch, and I hereby arrest you on a charge of conspiracy to end the world. You need not say anything-”
“I don’t intend to say anything.” said Cohen, raising his sword. “I’m just gonna cut your -ing head off.”
“Hold it, hold it,” said Boy Willie urgently. “Do you know who we all are?”
“Yessir. I believe so. You are Boy Willie, aka Mad Bill, Wilhelm the Chopper, the Great-”
“And you are going to arrest us? You say you are some kind of a watchman?”
“That is correct, sir.”
“We must’ve killed hundreds of watchmen in our time, lad!”
“I’m sorry to hear that, sir.”
“Ow much do they pay you. boy?” said Caleb.
“Forty-three dollars a month, Mr.Ripper. With allowances.”
The Horde burst out laughing. Then Carrot drew his sword.
“I must insist, sir. What you are planning to do will destroy the world.”
“Only this bit, lad,” said Cohen. “Now you could go off home and-”
“I’m being patient, sir. out of respect for your grey hairs.”
There was a further burst of laughing and Mad Hamish had to be slapped on the back. “Just a moment, boys.” said Mrs McGarry quietly. “Are we thinking this one through? Look around you.” They looked around.
“Well?” Cohen demanded.
“There’s me, and you,” said Vena, “and Truckle and Boy Willie and Harnish and Caleb and the minstrel.”
“So? So?”
“That’s seven,” said Vena. “Seven of us, against one of him. Seven against one. And he thinks he’s going to save the world. And he knows who we are and he’s still going to fight us ...”
“You think he’s a hero?” cackled Mad Hamish. “Hah! Wha’ kind o’ hero works for forty-three dollars a month? Plus allowances!”
But the cackle was all alone in the sudden quietness. The Horde could calculate the peculiar mathematics of heroism quite quickly.
There was, there always was, at the start and finish ... the Code. They lived by the Code. You followed the Code, and you became part of the Code for those who followed you. The Code was it. Without the Code, you weren’t a hero. You were just a thug in a loincloth.
The Code was quite clear. One brave man against seven ... won. They knew it was true. In the past, they’d all relied on it. The higher the odds, the greater the victory. That was the Code.
Forget the Code, dismiss the Code, deny the Code ... and the Code would take you.
They looked clown at Captain Carrot’s sword. It was short, sharp and plain. It was a working sword. It had no runes on it. No mystic gleam twinkled on its edge.
If you believed in the Code, that was worrying. One simple sword in the hands of a truly brave man would cut through a magical sword like suet.
It wasn’t a frightening thought, but it was a thought.

Sanagi
05-07-2015, 12:54 AM
See also the million-to-one chance from Guards! Guards!

Although I think my favorite passage is the ship sailing into Death from Small Gods.

Octopus Prime
05-07-2015, 02:29 AM
My favorites always been Vimes arresting two battling armies for disturbing the peace.

SpoonyBardOL
05-29-2015, 10:15 AM
So if I finally wanted to start this series, should I just begin with The Colour of Magic and continue in chronological release order?

fugu13
05-29-2015, 10:32 AM
I strongly recommend against that approach. Personally, I recommend not reading the colour of magic or light fantastic until you've completed most of at least one of the other major character groupings. They just aren't that much like the rest of the series or as good. Well, unless you're a Gray Mouser fan, in which case they'll have more humor.

This is the classic reading order guide, I believe linked above a few times: http://www.lspace.org/books/reading-order-guides/the-discworld-reading-order-guide-20.jpg

The Death novels and Watch novels are both classic starting places. The Witches books have more ups and downs, but include several greats, and eventually reach the incredible Tiffany Aching young adult books. Small Gods is a particularly excellent standalone that you could read right off (don't pay attention to being placed after Pyramids, which is also solid for reading standalone).

Octopus Prime
05-29-2015, 10:45 AM
Pyramids and Small Gods are not only both stand-alone, but they also cover much of the same story beats.

It's just that the Comedy/Drama ratio swings in rather different directions for each of them. And Omnism and History Monks both show up in multiple books.

The important thing to note is that Discworld is chronological, but not sequential, at least outside of a given series. And even then, you can usually read any book in a given series alone and still work things through easily enough.

I read the Watch books in a sideways order and was able to follow just fine.

Zef
05-29-2015, 10:46 AM
To offer an alternate perspective, I've been reading in chronological order since 2001 and have never had an issue with this approach. Yeah, The Color of Magic reads primitive by direct comparison to more recent books, and halfway through I was still wondering what people saw in the series, but by the time I finished it I was thrilled and immediately went to consume The Light Fantastic.

I've also never gone out of my way to read by "groups", not even when rereading them. The chronological order --which naturally alternates Wizards with Death with Watch with Witches with Standalones-- has allowed me to better appreciate Pratchett's evolving style, their different perspectives, worldbuilding, and interconnections (like seeing the effects of a Watch book on, say, The Truth or Monstrous Regiment).

Of course, putting off the Tiffany Aching books for so long means that I'll end up reading them all in one go, especially with the September release. Maybe I'll alternate with books I haven't reread yet.

Egarwaen
05-29-2015, 12:04 PM
The biggest problem with reading in chronological order is Sourcery, which is utterly awful. Colour of Magic and Light Fantastic are acceptable starting points if you're a fan of classic SF/Fantasy (and will enjoy, eg, extended sequences that have little to recommend them other than lampooning a specific series), and Equal Rites is a pretty good follow-up to them.

Otherwise start with Mort, which is basically the first book to capture anything resembling the tone of any of the rest of the series, then proceed to either Wyrd Sisters or Pyramids.

Gerad
05-29-2015, 09:26 PM
To offer an alternate perspective, I've been reading in chronological order since 2001 and have never had an issue with this approach. Yeah, The Color of Magic reads primitive by direct comparison to more recent books, and halfway through I was still wondering what people saw in the series, but by the time I finished it I was thrilled and immediately went to consume The Light Fantastic.

I've also never gone out of my way to read by "groups", not even when rereading them. The chronological order --which naturally alternates Wizards with Death with Watch with Witches with Standalones-- has allowed me to better appreciate Pratchett's evolving style, their different perspectives, worldbuilding, and interconnections (like seeing the effects of a Watch book on, say, The Truth or Monstrous Regiment).

Exactly the same case here. Just finished Men at Arms a week ago.

Octopus Prime
05-30-2015, 09:25 AM
Speaking of, in right in the middle of rereading Thud.

It's about 9/10s great, and one-tenth... Let's be polite and say "questionable"

Thaeus
05-30-2015, 05:22 PM
The important thing to note is that Discworld is chronological, but not sequential, at least outside of a given series. And even then, you can usually read any book in a given series alone and still work things through easily enough.

Yea, this. There aren't any overarching plot threads between books tying everything together (mostly, anyway). Witches Abroad is a sequel of sorts to Wyrd Sisters, but you needn't know anything from the latter to understand it.

(Although funnily, the next Witches book, Lords and Ladies, does build off its predecessors. I'm pretty sure there's a preamble about beginnings and endings that basically amounts to "sorry everyone, you need to have read the other books this time".)

Thaeus
09-11-2015, 02:46 AM
Mark Reads is currently doing Small Gods. I love his reactions while he's reading the dialog between Vorbis and the Tyrant of Ephebe, particularly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGF6qS27fUc&feature=youtu.be&t=16m41s

(For the curious, all the write-ups thus far can be found at http://markreads.net/reviews/tag/small-gods/ )

Daikaiju
10-07-2016, 09:07 AM
Celebrating 25 years of Discworld Emporium (http://www.discworldemporium.com/atuin-discworld-figurine)

http://i1266.photobucket.com/albums/jj537/greenhooves04/atuin_zpsejajumxg.png

Taeryn
05-15-2017, 06:55 AM
I am currently reading Small Gods and after sort of feeling rather "meh" with the first few chapters, the further it goes, the more I'm liking it. This is the first discworld book for me.

Zef
05-15-2017, 08:09 AM
That's a fine intro to Discworld! Pratchett had refined his craft and humor considerably since The Color of Magic and it also showcases his particular philosophies and humanism that shine brightly throughout his books. And as a religious person myself, I find that Pratchett, famously atheist, has an excellent grasp on spiritualism and the difference between organized religion and personal devotion (I still maintain Small Gods is a must-read for anyone remotely serious about their own faith.)

JBear
05-15-2017, 10:26 AM
Yeah, Small Gods is usually my recommendation for anyone looking to dip their toe into Discworld. The recommended reading order unfortunately gets a lot muddier from there. >_<

Daikaiju
05-15-2017, 11:03 AM
I read them in their published order, but I concur. Small Gods is an excellent intro. After that, maybe Guards, Guards! This is the tipping point for the Disc's march into modernity.

Sven
05-15-2017, 12:57 PM
I read them in their published order, but I concur. Small Gods is an excellent intro. After that, maybe Guards, Guards! This is the tipping point for the Disc's march into modernity.

Yeah, Guards Guards! is the intro to the "march of history" Ankh-Mopork-centric books: from there you go to Moving Pictures, which is a prototype of so much of the series after that point (EG, new technology is developed, exploited, causes chaos, then gets normalised to the point where it's remarked as being part of the furniture in later books).

Along those lines -

Moving Pictures - Movies
Men at Arms - Firearms
Soul Music - Rock n Roll
Feet of Clay - This one actually doesn't fit, but is essential to the overall story.
Jingo - Diplomacy and War
The Fifth Elephant - Communications / Telegraphs
The Truth - Printing Presses / Newspapers
Going Postal - Mail
Making Money - Currency
Raising Steam - Railroads

The later Vimes books - Night Watch, Thud, and Snuff - all don't really fit into the progression, but they're important for the overall progression of Ankh-Mopork in particular (although like most people I thought Thud was weak). Fifth Elephant winds up being a REALLY important book for years and years later, between the first real introduction to Dwarf politics and the Clacks.

Büge
05-15-2017, 01:13 PM
I tried reading Moving Pictures, but I couldn't finish it. The main character felt too much like a reskin of Rincewind.

Sven
05-15-2017, 01:28 PM
Most of the main characters in the technology line aren't very important - they're there to pace the reader through the references and react to what's going on around them.

Moist gets a bit more depth by necessity since he's the hero of three books, but even then Pratchett's writing had evolved to the point where he was writing more about the world than the hero.

FelixSH
05-15-2017, 06:59 PM
Nice, a discworld thread.

During my reread of all the discworld books in publishing order, I'm now in the middle of Wyrd Sisters. I enjoyed all the books up to now (even Sourcery, which I found to be a perfectly enjoyable read), but this one feels like a big improvement. I love the three witches, especially Nanny and Granny, and the bit where Granny critizices the play is beautiful. But the humour feels like it developed in general.

I can't wait to get to Lords and Ladies.

Daikaiju
05-16-2017, 08:55 AM
If you like The Ramtops witches, make sure you check out the Tiffany Aching books, starting with The Wee Free Men.

JBear
05-16-2017, 09:40 AM
I've never liked the Witches. Just never clicked with me. I've read every Discworld book except that sub-series, which I just started skipping over after reading a couple and hating them. In fact, I almost didn't read any Pratchett at all, since my introduction to his writing was the Witches short story in Legends, which was awful. I'm glad that I decided to give his other stuff a try anyway.

Sven
05-16-2017, 10:02 AM
I've never liked the Witches. Just never clicked with me. I've read every Discworld book except that sub-series, which I just started skipping over after reading a couple and hating them. In fact, I almost didn't read any Pratchett at all, since my introduction to his writing was the Witches short story in Legends, which was awful. I'm glad that I decided to give his other stuff a try anyway.

I'm in the same boat. The Witches stuff is for a specific type of reader that is very much not me.

Zef
05-16-2017, 11:05 AM
I'm in the same boat. The Witches stuff is for a specific type of reader that is very much not me.

I haven't read Raising Steam yet, but I feel similarly about Moist. I'm hoping his third book changes my opinion.

I will always lament that we never got to see Granny Weatherwax meet Vimes. While the Disc would've probably collapsed under such concentrated awesome, those are my two favorite Pratchett protags and I would've liked seeing them butting heads. It's doubly sad because Vimes HAS gone to Witches country and Granny and Nanny HAVE gone to the city and they never crossed paths.

Sven
05-16-2017, 11:56 AM
The closest you get to that is the gag from Fifth Elephant with the depressed trousers of Uncle Vanya. That scene was pretty clearly written to invoke the witches, even if it didn't use them.

Octopus Prime
05-16-2017, 12:44 PM
I don't think I've actually read any of the Witches books, but loved the Tiffany Aching series

Daikaiju
05-16-2017, 03:59 PM
I haven't read Raising Steam yet, but I feel similarly about Moist. I'm hoping his third book changes my opinion.

I will always lament that we never got to see Granny Weatherwax meet Vimes. While the Disc would've probably collapsed under such concentrated awesome, those are my two favorite Pratchett protags and I would've liked seeing them butting heads. It's doubly sad because Vimes HAS gone to Witches country and Granny and Nanny HAVE gone to the city and they never crossed paths.

Odds are they're both such powerful sources of Narrativium (https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Narrativium), they probably unconsciously are kept apart to keep their storylines on an even keel.

FelixSH
05-16-2017, 05:51 PM
If you like The Ramtops witches, make sure you check out the Tiffany Aching books, starting with The Wee Free Men.

Oh, it's a reread, I read most of the books already at some point. Still thanks for the info, Tiffanys books are probably my favourite sub-series, with Hat Full of Sky and Wintersmith being probably my favourite Discworld books. Having Nanny and Granny as side characters and teachers was a very clever move of Pratchett, showing them in a new light.

FelixSH
06-16-2017, 08:28 AM
Wyrd Sisters stayed pretty good for the whole time. I really enjoyed the reread after all this years.

Pyramids, on the other hand, was clearly early Discworld. Actually, I don't understand why people call Sourcery the most skippable book of the series when this one is right here. Not that it's bad - from the four parts, the first and third were as enjoyable of most of the staff in the books before it. Part four less so, and part two was probably the only time a discworld novel actively bored me.

Again, not that it's bad, but from all the Discworld books I've read this was the weakest. It's also responsible for me not reading Small Gods, back 15 years ago, when I first read some of the books, because I had no more interest in not-Egypt.

Guards, Guards on the other hand feels on the same level as Wyrd Sisters. Not quite there yet, but clearly a step up from what came before. Vetinary doesn't feel quite right, and Vimes just starts to stop being drunk all the time, so I can't even judge him now, but it all feels sort of right.

Taeryn
06-19-2017, 08:21 AM
So, I finished Small Gods and I enjoyed it enough to give Mort a read. I liked the ending of Mort more than Small Gods.
Those two and recommendations here got me to try Guards, Guards! and I've almost finished it. Now that's a book I've enjoyed a lot. I've found every character to be really funny in their own way. The only weird thing to me is Pratchett always cuts away from any action. When the dragon attacks the coronation ceremony, I think Vimes even comments on how spectacular it was. Not to say that's bad or good, just an interesting choice by the author.

I don't know that I'm really a huge Pratchett fan at this point. The books are clever and get a chuckle out of me. Its kinda fun to read a book that just doesn't take itself too seriously. I'll probably need to take a break from it for a while though.

Zef
06-19-2017, 09:29 AM
Even by the time of G,G!, Pratchett was still finding his style. He continues to improve, and so do his action scenes --all of the Watch books excel at action, in varying degrees, and the Rincewind/Wizards books have humorous sequences too.

Daikaiju
09-08-2017, 10:07 PM
Terry Pratchett's unfinished novels destroyed by steamroller
Unpublished works are lost for ever with crushing of computer hard drive – as the late fantasy novelist had instructed (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/aug/30/terry-pratchett-unfinished-novels-destroyed-streamroller?CMP=share_btn_fb)

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DIEYpkvXUAMOStU.jpg

Jeanie
09-09-2017, 12:31 AM
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DIahaavV4AA-c24?format=jpg

Octopus Prime
09-09-2017, 02:25 AM
[CENTER]Terry Pratchett's unfinished novels destroyed by steamroller
Unpublished works are lost for ever with crushing of computer hard drive – as the late fantasy novelist had instructed (https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/aug/30/terry-pratchett-unfinished-novels-destroyed-streamroller?CMP=share_btn_fb)


That is in character.