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ThornGhost
03-09-2015, 07:33 AM
I always try to bring my lunch to work at least three or four days a week to avoid having to go out for lunch. I'm afraid I've gotten in a kind of rut, though, as I usually don't get much more interesting than a healthy sandwich, chips and yogurt or fruit.

I know some people do a sort of weekly lunch prep where they cook a bunch of food at the beginning of the week and then divide it up into containers to take each day. Does anybody here do this? Can you give me some suggestions to try? I'd especially be interested in crock pot dishes, but am not averse to more involved meals.

Patrick
03-09-2015, 08:54 AM
I've been getting a few pre-made salad containers each week, in addition to a similar sandwich/yogurt lunch other days. They're cheaper than eating out, but still not as cheap as they could be if I made my own salad. I've been thinking about getting some good Tupperware and just making one big salad each week. I suspect that it wouldn't last more than two days though, which is always my problem with making salad instead of buying it.

I'm interested in hearing other suggestions too!

MagFlare
03-09-2015, 09:59 AM
I'm a big believer in slow cookers. Make a big heap of stew one day, eat some of it for dinner, and then pour it into a bunch of little seal-top glass bowls for the rest of the week. Stew tends to freeze well, too.

BŁge
03-09-2015, 10:39 AM
I do this too. Not just chili or casserole, either. Lots of recipes are easy to portion out, and I like to include something to fill out the lunch, like veggies or rice. Sometimes I make chicken dishes and have enough pieces to use 1-2 per meal.

I get a lot of use out of the recipes at budgetbytes.com.

taosterman
03-09-2015, 11:32 AM
I know some people do a sort of weekly lunch prep where they cook a bunch of food at the beginning of the week and then divide it up into containers to take each day. Does anybody here do this? Can you give me some suggestions to try? I'd especially be interested in crock pot dishes, but am not averse to more involved meals.

Pad thai - cheap ingredients, huge yield. A lot of East Asian noodle dishes are great for this, actually.

Serephine
03-09-2015, 09:57 PM
As someone who just trashed like 25 bucks worth of sandwich fixins because I got incredibly tired of sandwiches all the time and accidentally not accidentally left them to go bad this is super fuckin relevent to my interests. That the nature of my job means rarely having time to sit down and actually properly reheat previously portioned meals makes this whole thing a real pain!

Olli T
03-10-2015, 01:38 AM
I eat a lot of salads at work. They usually take some extra steps to prepare the night before, but with some practice, it doesn't need to take more than a couple of minutes. Some favorite non-fresh ingredients:
* couscous
* quinoa
* bulgur
* chickpeas
* pumpkin etc. seeds
* olives
* dried onion flakes
* feta
* cottage cheese
* sweet corn

upupdowndown
03-10-2015, 08:10 AM
I do this every weekend. My diet is very low-carb so I really have to bring my food to work, otherwise I'm not gonna meet my intake goals. Currently I roast a 2 lb bag of green beans and pair that with meatloaf muffins I make in muffin tins. I also make sausage for my afternoon snack, and I'll also do some meat in my sous vide so that a few dinners during the week are easy-peasy. (example: cooking pork chops sous-vide so that I can just come home after work, sear them real quick and crust them with parm, and serve them with wilted greens. dinner in 10 minutes!)

Frittatas are also a wonderful thing to make for the week that you can easily cut up into 5-6 servings that reheat well or can be eaten cold.

Solitayre
03-10-2015, 08:45 AM
I started doing this a few months ago to save some money, since the cafeteria at my office is rather pricey. I usually buy a package of tortillas and then just fill them with whatever I'm in the mood for; flank steak, chicken, spinach, black beans, etc. Put a little shredded cheese in there to hold it together and put it in a pan for a minute until its nice and crispy. Easy way to make lunch for a week that comes pre-portioned. I probably save close to $100 a month doing it too.

This week is Mediterranean!

I get a lot of use out of the recipes at budgetbytes.com.

If anyone hasn't checked this out yet, it might be the best thing on the internet.

ThornGhost
03-10-2015, 09:05 AM
Pad thai - cheap ingredients, huge yield. A lot of East Asian noodle dishes are great for this, actually.

I took this to heart and made some pad thai last night. It was my first time and actually turned out pretty well. We ended up eating the majority of it for supper, but it left enough for two lunch portions. Not bad for about $7 worth of ingredients. (It might've been cheaper had I bothered to drive across town to the Asian supermarket, but I wasn't in the mood.) I'll probably do it again soon!

Funny enough, I saw this blog post (https://mealprepsunday.wordpress.com/) on Reddit today about this exact thing.

Violentvixen
03-16-2015, 12:46 PM
This celery/radish tuna salad (http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/tuna-salad-celery-radishes-recipe) is something I eat at least once a week. I skip the parsley and just eat it with a fork rather than crackers, though.

I'll often make quiche, mainly with this crust (http://www.food.com/recipe/quick-n-easy-quiche-crust-18185) because I hate making crusts normally and this is stupidly easy. This is a good starter recipe (http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/broccoli-garlic-quiche-354952), although I usually add in asparagus and use half as much cheese and take out a couple egg yolks to make it lighter. But I prefer egg whites to normal eggs so keep that mind!

You can also make quiche muffins (http://www.food.com/recipe/muffin-sized-breakfast-quiche-163211), but these require more chopping than I often care to do.

As for soup, I do a Roasted Red Pepper and Cauliflower (http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/red-pepper-cauliflower-soup) that's really filling and thick enough that it doesn't spill too easily.

There are also a lot of days where an apple and a mound of peanut butter is my lunch, but that's mainly due to free peanut butter at work.

MooMoo
03-24-2015, 01:31 PM
My quick (if you remember to make it), mega cheap, filling and easy dins is pasta + pesto. A jar of pesto is about 80p, fancier stuff for more, pasta is beans. Super tasty and piss to make.

MCBanjoMike
03-24-2015, 06:39 PM
Don't think I'm hating on pesto - dear god do I love pesto - but having that with pasta means you're basically eating oil and starch for lunch every day and nothing more.

Also, every time I see the title of this thread, I read it as "weekly lunch perp", which is actually something we had in my department for a little while a year or two back.

BŁge
03-24-2015, 06:50 PM
Don't think I'm hating on pesto - dear god do I love pesto - but having that with pasta means you're basically eating oil and starch for lunch every day and nothing more.

Not to mention garlic and (optionally) Parmesan cheese. Your co-workers will hate you, but not as much as your colon.

ThornGhost
03-25-2015, 01:51 PM
I kind of did this on Sunday! I chopped up some yams and baked them with olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic and paprika, steamed a bunch of broccoli and baked a few chicken breasts with garlic and cheese and boxed up four lunches - two for myself and two for my wife. They were all delicious, fairly healthy and I was done within an hour or so (with plenty of time to play vidja games while the chicken baked). I received compliments at work that my lunches looked really delicious.

I recommend trying it out, though you may have to cook more food than you think since I ended up only making four meals worth.

MooMoo
03-31-2015, 12:39 PM
Not to mention garlic and (optionally) Parmesan cheese. Your co-workers will hate you, but not as much as your colon.

I think I'm known as the "girl who makes pesto at dinnertime" in work. :) I can be identified by the smell in the air.

Which is bad I guess.

delicious pesto.

Destil
03-31-2015, 02:32 PM
Garlic is a vegetable, not a spice.

Been a great debate in my family for years.

Excitemike
03-31-2015, 03:07 PM
Garlic is a vegetable, not a spice.

Been a great debate in my family for years.

It can't be both?

Mr. Sensible
03-31-2015, 09:27 PM
Alternatively: garlic is an ~aromatic~

SpoonyBardOL
04-01-2015, 07:08 AM
Alternatively: garlic is amazing