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View Full Version : Canadian "Delicacies", Talking about Kraft Dinner and junk


SpoonyBardOL
07-31-2015, 08:02 AM
Or, as the stuff is now being rebranded, 'KD'. (http://www.cbc.ca/news/trending/kraft-dinner-officially-changes-its-name-to-kd-1.3174613) I never actually called it 'KD' though so the new rebranding is immediately awful.

I'm really not sure why Kraft Dinner/KayDee became so ubiquitously Canadian, first time I ever heard of our apparent love for the stuff being the butt of a joke was through South Park.

Like a lot of kids I grew up on the stuff, though I haven't eaten it in years thanks to learning how to actually cook. There was a time, though, when I'd scarf down an entire box for lunch. Not something I could do anymore, especially after noticing the nutrition information on the side and realizing the listed portion size was only, like, 1/4th of a box (seriously just add up the sodium content for full box. Yow)

Then I had a phase when I started adding real shredded cheese to a pot of Kraft dinner and eating the whole thing and oh god what on Earth was I doing

But while I know it's absolutely terrible for you and I'm perfectly capable of cooking far better, and real, macaroni and cheese I still kind of miss it sometimes. It was the go-to lunch when there was nothing else to eat for a really long time in my life. Every now and then we'd get a new pasta shape which ultimately just made it harder to cook and serve, but you didn't care. I know I didn't when we got that limited time Super Mario Bros Kraft Dinner back in the early 90s.

I have a specific memory of eating the SMB Kraft dinner one afternoon, and biting into a Starman-shaped noodle that had a little chunk of the cheese powder that didn't get blended into the sauce properly. #KDnostalgia

What's your favorite shape of gross noodle to swim in a pot of cheese-like chemicals? I know a lot of people swear by original, but for me it was Spirals fo' life.

Thaeus
07-31-2015, 08:29 AM
I was never a big KD fan, to be honest. I was given a couple boxes for my birthday this year, and while I appreciate the intent, I'm probably going to pass them onto other Canucks.

Obligatory youtube video: Irish People Taste Test Canadian Foods (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pua6Kc6qI14). Apparently Coffee Crisps are only sold in Canada. Neat!

madhair60
07-31-2015, 09:01 AM
what's a kraft dinner? not googling it.

BŁge
07-31-2015, 11:14 AM
what's a kraft dinner? not googling it.

Boxed macaroni with cheese powder packet.

Kylie
07-31-2015, 11:17 AM
what's a kraft dinner? not googling it.

If you had a million dollars, you could eat a lot of it.

Falselogic
07-31-2015, 11:37 AM
what's a kraft dinner? not googling it.

It's amazing that is what it is!

JBear
07-31-2015, 02:26 PM
I have a lot of Kraft Dinner nostalgia. I ate a ton of it growing up, including the aforementioned terrible shaped ones like Super Mario and Ninja Turtles. I always keep one box in my cupboard as a comfort food, but it generally just sits there, as I'm always disappointed when I eat it.

I was always a fan of poorly blended Kraft Dinner with bits of cheese powder, and for some reason I've always preferred room temperature left-over KD to freshly made. I used to love it when I'd come home from work and get to finish off a pot that my ex-wife had made at lunch time.

And I too had the "make KD delicious by adding cheese to it" phase.

Obligatory youtube video: Irish People Taste Test Canadian Foods (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pua6Kc6qI14). Apparently Coffee Crisps are only sold in Canada. Neat!
Cesars are Canadian? Anyway, they're awful.

And that guy who wants to add greens to poutine is a crazy person.

Mightyblue
07-31-2015, 03:05 PM
Oh, so it's just your basic blue box Kraft macaroni stuff.

BŁge
07-31-2015, 03:08 PM
If you had a million dollars, you could eat a lot of it.

I wanna be your Yoko Ono, Kylie. <3

Kylie
07-31-2015, 03:08 PM
Plus ketchup.

will
07-31-2015, 03:14 PM
I wanna be your Yoko Ono, Kylie. <3

Plus ketchup.

Hey, get a room!

Kylie
07-31-2015, 03:44 PM
Hey, get a room!

Hey buddy, the thread says "Canadian Delicacies"! Is this not how Canada works?

Dadgum Roi
08-01-2015, 05:52 AM
My only contribution to this thread is that I was in Mexico years ago. My wife and I had rented a car and were tooling around the Yucatan. We were coming into the capital of YucatŠn state, and we were in a pretty rough-looking area. At one point I saw a crude, homemade made sign on the side of the road that had "Restaurante Canadiense" scrawled on it with an arrow pointing right, down a dark, forbidding track that was hacked out of thick, virgin jungle.

Wolfgang
08-01-2015, 08:10 AM
At the end of the path was a large wooden crate with one side held up by a stick, and resting in the shade of that box was one package of kd

I prefer the stuff with the silver packet of cheese sauce, not the powder. Fry up some bacon or some ham(turkey?)burger to put in and that's some garbage unhealthy junk comfort food. Is that even in Canada?

BŁge
08-01-2015, 08:14 AM
I didn't think you could make a more ghetto Hamburger Helper but somehow Wolfgang found a way.

Karzac
08-01-2015, 08:25 AM
I'm really not sure why Kraft Dinner/KayDee became so ubiquitously Canadian, first time I ever heard of our apparent love for the stuff being the butt of a joke was through South Park.


Kraft is originally a Canadian company, so that's probably how the association got made.


Cesars are Canadian? Anyway, they're awful.

Caesars are Canadian because the key ingredient, Clamato, is Canadian. It's also the number one thing I find foreigners get grossed out about.

Caesars are great, though.

On the topic of KD, I too ate a bunch of it when I was a kid, but I went through phases where I hated it. I haven't eaten it in years though.

Wolfgang
08-01-2015, 08:26 AM
damn right, I'm street as fuck yo

the hard streets of, like, manitoba? Though I think for me it was more 'upscale broke college student'

BŁge
08-01-2015, 09:02 PM
Hm. Apparently, our three most common choices for the National Food of Cananda is poutine, KD, and butter tarts. All three are loaded with salt, starch and fat. What does THAT say about us?

Falselogic
08-01-2015, 09:28 PM
Hm. Apparently, our three most common choices for the National Food of Cananda is poutine, KD, and butter tarts. All three are loaded with salt, starch and fat. What does THAT say about us?

That the USA is rubbing off on you...

Daikaiju
08-01-2015, 09:33 PM
Screw this noise. I want the UK's potato waffles!! I WILL RANSOM THE CROWN JEWELS FOR THEM.

taosterman
08-02-2015, 01:51 AM
I had poutine a couple days ago and it still looks and tastes like something a 4-year-old (or stoner) (or both) came up with. Maybe if the fries were absolutely perfect ...

Thaeus
08-02-2015, 04:47 AM
Caesars are great, though.

No. I had my first one (IIRC) back in March, and it was disgusting. Clamato juice is an abomination that will surely prevent Canada from ever getting a permanent seat on the UN's security council.

I had poutine a couple days ago and it still looks and tastes like something a 4-year-old (or stoner) (or both) came up with. Maybe if the fries were absolutely perfect ...

I think my gateway poutine was the stuff sold by New York Fries (which is apparently a Canadian chain, whodathunk). It's a simple dish, but I've had plenty of poutine (especially outside of Canada) that has the component ingredients (or at least reasonable approximations) but missed that certain je ne sais quoi of actual poutine.

If you're even in Vancouver, I can recommend some good poutineries.

Thaeus
08-02-2015, 04:55 AM
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-psCTe6VRVAY/Vb32Pllzg3I/AAAAAAAAVhM/AtOm2715nJs/s640-Ic42/IMG_20131022_125510.jpg

Maple Moose (http://maplemoose.ie/) is a real thing that exists (at least in the Ilac Shopping Centre in Dublin). I don't consider crepes especially Canadian, but I liked it.

(Sorry for the shoddy picture, it's the only one I could find. The lit-up sign should have a red maple leaf in the background.)

Torzelbaum
08-02-2015, 06:27 AM
I don't consider crepes especially Canadian, but I liked it.Of course not. They're French-Canadian, duh...

Grignr
08-02-2015, 06:50 AM
I prefer the stuff with the silver packet of cheese sauce, not the powder. Fry up some bacon or some ham(turkey?)burger to put in and that's some garbage unhealthy junk comfort food.

My daughter's used to like to eat that version (it's Kraft "Deluxe") and my favorite variant was to add leftover taco beef (also made from a kit) and have cheesy taco mac.

My parents take the basic powder kit and add a can of tuna and one of those little cans of tomato sauce. That's also good!

Bunk Moreland
08-02-2015, 07:04 AM
Hm. Apparently, our three most common choices for the National Food of Cananda is poutine, KD, and butter tarts. All three are loaded with salt, starch and fat. What does THAT say about us?

That Canadian food is just as much of a modified version of English food as most US food is!

Anyway, I just wanted to post here to say that while I don't really like ketchup, I am surprised at how damn good ketchup flavored potato chips are.

jpfriction
08-02-2015, 11:08 AM
I'm pretty sure the existence of this thread and the fact that I clicked on it (or more likely watching that video) has caused targeted Kraft ads to show up in my Twitter app.

The future is scary.

Red Hedgehog
08-02-2015, 02:14 PM
I think my gateway poutine was the stuff sold by New York Fries (which is apparently a Canadian chain, whodathunk).

Boston Pizza is also a Canadian chain. Which I always find hilarious because it's not like Boston is known for its pizza.

I guess this is how it must feel for someone from China to visit here and see a restaurant named "Shanghai Garden".

Dadgum Roi
08-02-2015, 02:24 PM
Boston Pizza is also a Canadian chain. Which I always find hilarious because it's not like Boston is known for its pizza.

I guess this is how it must feel for someone from China to visit here and see a restaurant named "Shanghai Garden".

This analogy only falls down a bit because Canadians are close enough to Boston and areas that are known for their pizza to know better.

Red Hedgehog
08-02-2015, 05:08 PM
This analogy only falls down a bit because Canadians are close enough to Boston and areas that are known for their pizza to know better.

You'd think that, but every Canadian that I've mentioned the oddness of a franchise calling itself "Boston pizza" hasn't found anything odd about it. I think they just assume the US is known for pizza and one city is as good as any other.

Falselogic
08-02-2015, 05:45 PM
I prefer the stuff with the silver packet of cheese sauce, not the powder. Fry up some bacon or some ham(turkey?)burger to put in and that's some garbage unhealthy junk comfort food. Is that even in Canada?

You mean Velveeta?

Thaeus
08-03-2015, 03:25 AM
You'd think that, but every Canadian that I've mentioned the oddness of a franchise calling itself "Boston pizza" hasn't found anything odd about it. I think they just assume the US is known for pizza and one city is as good as any other.

I never really thought about that. Upthread I mentioned New York Fries; are fries in NYC actually a thing?

I was more confused by the "Pizza" part of the name, because I really hate their pizza.

Patrick
08-03-2015, 08:51 AM
Oh, so it's just your basic blue box Kraft macaroni stuff.

I eventually had to look this up, and it is exactly the same, just with different branding. I was expecting a bigger portion or something.

I ate that a lot as a kid. Nowadays I'll occasionally pick up some Annie's mac & cheese:

http://i.imgur.com/6zXJNN2.png

It's way better! White cheddar is the way to go.

madhair60
08-03-2015, 08:59 AM
Screw this noise. I want the UK's potato waffles!! I WILL RANSOM THE CROWN JEWELS FOR THEM.

I remember when I went to my Aunt's house as a kid and she presented me with potato waffles with a slice of cheese placed on top and grilled.

talk about your treats mate talk about your treats

taosterman
08-03-2015, 09:00 AM
Getting used to a style of Detroit hot dog called "Coney Island" was pretty strange. I also still haven't quite figured out what differentiates them so much from regular chili dogs that they needed to appropriate another city's place name.

Red Hedgehog
08-03-2015, 11:48 AM
I never really thought about that. Upthread I mentioned New York Fries; are fries in NYC actually a thing?

No, but I'm hard pressed to think of any geographic location in the US that is specifically known for its fries.

LBD_Nytetrayn
08-03-2015, 02:31 PM
Or, as the stuff is now being rebranded, 'KD'. (http://www.cbc.ca/news/trending/kraft-dinner-officially-changes-its-name-to-kd-1.3174613) I never actually called it 'KD' though so the new rebranding is immediately awful.

Huh, I thought they were doing that already. "Gotta be KD" and all that.

I'm really not sure why Kraft Dinner/KayDee became so ubiquitously Canadian, first time I ever heard of our apparent love for the stuff being the butt of a joke was through South Park.

Kraft is Canadian, so... maybe that?

I have a specific memory of eating the SMB Kraft dinner one afternoon, and biting into a Starman-shaped noodle that had a little chunk of the cheese powder that didn't get blended into the sauce properly. #KDnostalgia

I remember that stuff. I think I kept the box. What gets me is that you almost never see these cool variations here in Canada any more. I always liked them, even without the standard cheese powder, because of the unique textures from the shaped pasta.

One time, I had a bowl of the TMNT shaped stuff and basically recited this verbatim with one of the Turtle pieces on my fingertip:

http://www.talking-time.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=717&stc=1&d=1438633383

Friend couldn't stop laughing...

Plus ketchup.

I prefer mustard.

Caesars are Canadian because the key ingredient, Clamato, is Canadian. It's also the number one thing I find foreigners get grossed out about.

Nadia said they tried to spread the love to other countries, but they weren't having any of it.

Hm. Apparently, our three most common choices for the National Food of Cananda is poutine, KD, and butter tarts. All three are loaded with salt, starch and fat. What does THAT say about us?

Winter is coming?

I think my gateway poutine was the stuff sold by New York Fries (which is apparently a Canadian chain, whodathunk). It's a simple dish, but I've had plenty of poutine (especially outside of Canada) that has the component ingredients (or at least reasonable approximations) but missed that certain je ne sais quoi of actual poutine.

Loooooooove me some New York Fries poutine. So much that it's what I used to create the officially-recognized South St. Poutine Burger (http://www.poisonmushroom.org/2015/05/pmo-food-science-vol-1-the-south-st-poutine-burger/).

Anyway, I just wanted to post here to say that while I don't really like ketchup, I am surprised at how damn good ketchup flavored potato chips are.

I'm very particular about these. I think the only ones I've come close to liking are the President's Choice "loaded" version, but I do rather like ketchup Doritos. Those are #1.

No, but I'm hard pressed to think of any geographic location in the US that is specifically known for its fries.

Yeah, this and Boston Pizza both threw me for a loop at first until I made the same realization that Red Hedgehog did.

Dadgum Roi
08-04-2015, 06:30 AM
You'd think that, but every Canadian that I've mentioned the oddness of a franchise calling itself "Boston pizza" hasn't found anything odd about it. I think they just assume the US is known for pizza and one city is as good as any other.

Thought experiment:

Detroit Pizza (there is actually a place called Jet's Pizza in my town that advertises its "Detroit-style pizza". It's okay.)

Chicago Pizza

Seattle Pizza

Omaha Pizza

Dallas Pizza

Houston Pizza

Birmingham Pizza

Orlando Pizza

Charleston Pizza

Raleigh Pizza

Norfolk Pizza

Newark Pizza (Eeeyew)

Montpelier Pizza

Patrick
08-04-2015, 08:16 AM
Quad Cities pizza is a thing and it's actually fairly good. I say this as someone who lives in Chicago and can get really good pizza whenever I want.

Well done, Quad Cities.

BŁge
08-04-2015, 10:20 AM
Thought experiment:

Detroit Pizza (there is actually a place called Jet's Pizza in my town that advertises its "Detroit-style pizza". It's okay.)

Chicago Pizza

Seattle Pizza

Omaha Pizza

Dallas Pizza

Houston Pizza

Birmingham Pizza

Orlando Pizza

Charleston Pizza

Raleigh Pizza

Norfolk Pizza

Newark Pizza (Eeeyew)

Montpelier Pizza

Okay (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okay,_Oklahoma) Pizza

Accident (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accident,_Maryland) Pizza

spineshark
08-04-2015, 11:57 AM
Quad Cities pizza is a thing and it's actually fairly good. I say this as someone who lives in Chicago and can get really good pizza whenever I want.

Well done, Quad Cities.i've only heard of quad cities pizza because at one point somebody edited the wikipedia article to say that the crust contains a "spice jam"

it got reverted, sadly

Red Hedgehog
08-04-2015, 12:25 PM
Newark Pizza (Eeeyew)

Man, New Jersey has some pretty great pizza. Some would say better than New York. I wouldn't but Pizza and Subs/Hoagies are the foods New Jersey is known for.

That said, Newark probably isn't the place geographically in Jersey for the best pizza. (though it does apparently have the #7 pizza restaurant in the state (http://www.nj.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2014/10/njs_best_pizza_the_definitive_list_for_national_pi zza_month.html)). Still, a place named "New Jersey Pizza" would be totally reasonable.

(And Chicago Pizza is that big, thick deep-dish pie thing they do, even though you can also find good, more standard thinner crust pizza in Chicago)

Dadgum Roi
08-04-2015, 01:18 PM
Still, a place named "New Jersey Pizza" would be totally reasonable.


Indeed I believe I have seen such a place around here. But look me in the eye and tell me you don't derive a negative connotation from "Newark Pizza".

Sven
08-04-2015, 03:01 PM
Boston Pizza is a pizza chain founded by a guy who's best known for his chain of oil & lube locations (and being a great Dragon's Den judge, and his son(?) now being the GM of the Calgary Flames).

No one I've ever encountered has been under any impression other than it's a complete joke of a name, but then opinions held outside of the centre of the universe don't count anyway.

Dadgum Roi
08-04-2015, 05:00 PM
No one I've ever encountered has been under any impression other than it's a complete joke of a name, but then opinions held outside of the centre of the universe don't count anyway.

Look, Sven, it's either this or more Rob Ford .gifs.

Red Hedgehog
08-04-2015, 05:58 PM
Indeed I believe I have seen such a place around here. But look me in the eye and tell me you don't derive a negative connotation from "Newark Pizza".

Oh, no doubt, but just because the city itself has such a poor reputation. Not specifically for food.

Karzac
08-04-2015, 07:41 PM
Boston Pizza is a pizza chain founded by a guy who's best known for his chain of oil & lube locations (and being a great Dragon's Den judge, and his son(?) now being the GM of the Calgary Flames).

No one I've ever encountered has been under any impression other than it's a complete joke of a name, but then opinions held outside of the centre of the universe don't count anyway.

My main association with Boston Pizza is mediocre food and Howie Mandel.

BŁge
08-05-2015, 06:16 AM
My main association with Boston Pizza is mediocre food and Howie Mandel.

JBear
08-05-2015, 09:54 AM
I've never previously devoted more than two seconds of thought to the name (I didn't associate it with Boston in the slightest; it's just a name *shrug*), but I've been coming around on Boston Pizza's food recently. When one first opened locally, I ate there a couple of times and was disappointed, but I have several friends from out of town who have dragged me there several times since, and I've quite enjoyed the sandwiches and pasta dishes that I've ordered.

Also, it just occurs to me that we have a local pizza place called "New England Pizza Company", and as far as I can tell they have nothing to do with New England. Oh, and they also serve awful pizza that makes me physically ill, which is a shame since they're a 5-minute walk from my house.

Red Hedgehog
08-05-2015, 12:36 PM
Also, it just occurs to me that we have a local pizza place called "New England Pizza Company", and as far as I can tell they have nothing to do with New England. Oh, and they also serve awful pizza that makes me physically ill, which is a shame since they're a 5-minute walk from my house.

Obviously just riding on Boston Pizza's coattails.

(Connecticut is actually known for its pizza, but that's obviously just a subset of New England)

Thaeus
08-05-2015, 03:15 PM
I've just tried the poutine at Taco Taco in Dublin and can attest that it's not, in fact, poutine. The gravy was all at the bottom of the tray instead of on the chips; they replaced cheese curds (curds are unknown in Ireland) with some sort of yellow sauce which I think was melted mozzarella; the chips themselves were good. Plus there were bits of bacon scattered all over, which were tasty.

It was decent enough, but it wasn't poutine.

Dadgum Roi
08-05-2015, 04:53 PM
I've just tried the poutine at Taco Taco in Dublin...

LBD_Nytetrayn
08-06-2015, 03:53 AM
Cross-posted with the potato chip thread...

http://www.talking-time.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=721&stc=1&d=1438854766

One thing I've never been able to wrap my mind around? The name "Montreal Smoked Meat." Just the "meat" part. So vague...

Googleshng
08-06-2015, 04:39 AM
(Connecticut is actually known for its pizza, but that's obviously just a subset of New England)

Darn right!

Although is should be noted that contrary to what Hollywood (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095690/) would tell you, Mystic Pizza pales in comparison to most other local options.

Seriously, every so often someone comes here from out of town who really wants to make a point of eating there.

SpoonyBardOL
08-06-2015, 07:43 AM
Dangit, I wanted to try and submit a flavor this year, I have a good one in mind but I never see the means to actually enter the contest before the new flavors come out.

Shagohod
08-08-2015, 01:21 AM
My parents take the basic powder kit and add a can of tuna and one of those little cans of tomato sauce. That's also good!

Who the hell would look at these three things and think of throwing them together? Why had nobody else asked this? Am I the only one who thinks it's weird?

I assume it had to have been at a broke time. I've mixed some ridiculous foods before because I couldn't afford groceries and had to work with what I had. Don't take my inquisitive ways as insulting. Merely curious.

LBD_Nytetrayn
08-08-2015, 02:00 AM
Science is a weird thing.

Wolfgang
08-08-2015, 09:35 AM
Philly has "Florida-style" pizza, because of course it does. And like most Philadelphian food, it's delicious in a trashy way and will kill you dead if you eat it more than once every few months. It takes the base concept of a food and adds thousands of calories in fat.

Florida-style is where you act like you're going to make a calzone, taking pizza dough and wrapping it around fillings like meat, saice and cheese. Then you deep fry it. It then bypasses your stomach and lodges itself in your heart.

teg
08-08-2015, 12:07 PM
GARLIC FINGERS! (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garlic_fingers)

http://i.imgur.com/x1lyrPE.jpg

They're specifically an Atlantic Canadian thing; kind of a weird minimalist pizza with no toppings except garlic butter, parsley, cheese, and -optionally- bacon bits. They're typically served at pizza joints, cut into "fingers" instead of slices, and come with delicious donair sauce to dip them in. They're unhealthy as fuck but I'm still gonna miss them when I eventually leave Atlantic Canada.

taosterman
08-08-2015, 12:10 PM
Those are usually just called cheesy sticks in the US. Donair and its associated sauce are the bomb, though.

SpoonyBardOL
08-08-2015, 12:17 PM
GARLIC FINGERS! (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garlic_fingers)

They... don't exist outside of Atlantic Canada?

Oh you poor souls.

Gaer
08-08-2015, 01:01 PM
They... don't exist outside of Atlantic Canada?

Oh you poor souls.

Oh, they do. The only problem is trying to track down donair sauce. But if you look you can find that too (in grocers).

Grignr
08-08-2015, 03:11 PM
Who the hell would look at these three things and think of throwing them together? Why had nobody else asked this? Am I the only one who thinks it's weird? .


I think "poor Southerner cuisine" is the answer - other people at college (in Florida) knew about it too. Parents called it tuna casserole.

Paul le Fou
08-09-2015, 12:41 AM
Boston Pizza

Maybe it never had anything to do with the city

http://www.shoutwiki.com/w/images/badwebcomicswiki/e/ec/TphW9.gif

Gwrrrk
08-09-2015, 10:31 AM
My main association with Boston Pizza is mediocre food and Howie Mandel.

Ayeeep

Double Dracula
08-13-2015, 10:28 PM
I remember when I went to my Aunt's house as a kid and she presented me with potato waffles with a slice of cheese placed on top and grilled.

talk about your treats mate talk about your treats

Rarely have I lol'd so hard. Had to show this post to my pal, and he lol'd too.

***

I blew my coworkers' minds when I told them that, back home in Canada, milk is sold in plastic bags.

Thaeus
08-14-2015, 01:54 AM
I blew my coworkers' minds when I told them that, back home in Canada, milk is sold in plastic bags.

I've never seen them in BC or Alberta (or, IIRC, Quebec), but my grandparents had them in Nova Scotia. According to wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milk_bag), it sounds like it's an eastern Canada thing. How prevalent are they? Does everyone use them?

Double Dracula
08-14-2015, 02:17 AM
I grew up in and around Toronto, and never saw a carton of milk in my home until I was in my late teens.

It may be less common now, but at one point, it was the de facto option for purveyors of milk.

Thaeus
08-14-2015, 03:35 AM
OK, slightly OT, but you can find Tim Hortons food overseas!

http://i.imgur.com/Qr8He79l.png

This was at a Eurospar convenience store in Dublin. The plaque on the wall talked about the distinguished history of Tim Horton and the namesake company. Alas, Spar has since switched to a different doughnut / coffee provider, and my days of getting not-really-Tim's-but-it's-a-doughnut! are over.

BŁge
08-14-2015, 07:36 AM
How prevalent are they? Does everyone use them?

If soy milk ever came in bags, I'd buy it.

Double Dracula
08-14-2015, 06:21 PM
This was at a Eurospar convenience store in Dublin.

I've been there! Was wandering around Dublin one day about a decade ago, and stumbled upon it, much to my surprise.

Thaeus
08-15-2015, 12:45 PM
I've been there! Was wandering around Dublin one day about a decade ago, and stumbled upon it, much to my surprise.

HIGH FIVE!

Double Dracula
08-15-2015, 06:46 PM
HIGH FIVE!

Heck yeah.

SpoonyBardOL
08-19-2015, 08:20 AM
So we might as well use this to talk about regional Canadian food (in fact some of us already are) so being the resident Newfie I would be remiss if I did not talk about Jiggs Dinner (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiggs_dinner). It's kind of the quintessential Newfie cuisine.

The meal has many pieces and not everyone includes everything or cooks it all the same way, but what the main parts fundamentally boil down to, pun intended, are various root vegetables (potato, carrot, turnip) boiled together with salt beef. It's not a proper Jiggs dinner if it doesn't have veggies boiled with salt beef.

Other things served with it can be cabbage (usually boiled with the other veggies), turnip greens (sometimes boiled separately, vinegar is often added to them on the table), pease pudding (made from cooked and smashed yellow split peas, like a super thick pea soup), figgy duff (a boiled, bagged bread pudding with raisins), and some kind of roasted meat (pork, beef, chicken, turkey, whatevs).

Also dressing (or stuffing), whether or not there's a chicken or turkey to stuff it in. 'Dry' dressing can be made without being cooked in a bird, and sometimes will be made anyway even if there's a chicken or turkey being cooked (at least in my family anyway). The dressing usually isn't terribly fancy, mostly just breadcrumbs, butter, and onion, but the distinct ingredient is savory (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_savory) which is common in Atlantic Canada and not so much everywhere else. If it doesn't have savory it's just not dressing. I have an aunt who lives in the US and always takes some back with her when she visits because she can't get it down there.

My folks would have this nearly every Sunday for lunch when I was growing up. Even to this day I have a nearly Pavlovian response whenever I smell anything that resembles a Jiggs Dinner being cooked and I immediately think it must be Sunday.

Honestly my folks had it so much I kind of got sick of it. There was a time when I absolutely hated Jiggs Dinner and just didn't want to eat it because it was every damn week. Now that the only time I ever have it is when I'm visiting home (I've never made it myself and probably never will) I find I like it a lot more. It's more nostalgic now, rather than "Oy, THIS again...".

Jiggs Dinner was on my mind particularly because I was recently back home on vacation. In fact there was a big family reunion where lots of distant relatives and their kids who never even had it before were around and the meal was made a lot.

Double Dracula
08-20-2015, 01:52 AM
I'd be interested in a recipe for Jiggs Dinner if you've got one. That sounds delicious.

SpoonyBardOL
08-20-2015, 05:43 AM
Honestly, I don't really know of any written recipes for Jiggs Dinner, it's one of those things that's taught from generation to generation.

Maybe some could be found through Google, but it's one of those things where you really have to see other people make it first, at least if you'll be doing the works. Trying to coordinate the cooking times for all the dishes, the roasted meat, the boiled veggies and salt beef, the pease pudding, the turnip greens, the figgy duff, and whatever else, is something that really takes practice and experience.

Maybe seek out recipes for the individual bits, first? It also depends on whether or not you can get a bucket of salt beef (and yes, it comes in buckets) at your local grocery store. In Atlantic Canada it's no problem, but I can't speak for anywhere else.

JBear
08-20-2015, 08:37 AM
It also depends on whether or not you can get a bucket of salt beef (and yes, it comes in buckets) at your local grocery store. In Atlantic Canada it's no problem, but I can't speak for anywhere else.
I have lived in Atlantic Canada my whole life, and I've never seen a bucket of salt beef. I think it might just be a Newfoundland thing.

Dawnswalker
08-20-2015, 12:30 PM
Do you have Sobeys in New Brunswick? I've also seen them at Co-op and Superstore.

JBear
08-20-2015, 01:01 PM
Do you have Sobeys in New Brunswick?
It's where I buy my groceries every week. I'm confident that I've never seen a bucket of salt beef there, or at least as confident as I can be given that I'm not even 100% certain what it is.

SpoonyBardOL
08-20-2015, 01:36 PM
IN OTHER NEWS, I think we've reached peak Canadian-ness.

Tim Hortons devises a 'Timbits Poutine'. (http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/08/19/timbits-poutine-cne-foods_n_8009532.html)

It's basically just a bowl of Timbits with some kind of whipped cream topping, but still.

Thaeus
08-20-2015, 01:41 PM
Now I have a reason to go back.

(Also, bucket of salt beef. Bucket of beef. My brain can't process it.)

EDIT: Boo, it's just for the CNE.

BŁge
08-20-2015, 03:05 PM
I know I've seen bucketed meat at Sobeys, but I think it's just tripe.

LBD_Nytetrayn
08-21-2015, 12:03 PM
IN OTHER NEWS, I think we've reached peak Canadian-ness.

Tim Hortons devises a 'Timbits Poutine'. (http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/08/19/timbits-poutine-cne-foods_n_8009532.html)

It's basically just a bowl of Timbits with some kind of whipped cream topping, but still.

Just heard of that. That's pretty weak sauce.

I want a Timbit soaked in cheese curds and gravy, dammit.

Hopefully the latke poutine I just learned about does it right.

JBear
08-21-2015, 01:03 PM
I want a Timbit soaked in cheese curds and gravy, dammit.
A sentence that I feel like I can state with confidence has never before been uttered.

Do you really, though? Do you really?

Torzelbaum
08-21-2015, 09:22 PM
I guess it would be like those burgers that use krispy kreme donuts for the bun...

LBD_Nytetrayn
08-22-2015, 11:06 AM
I guess it would be like those burgers that use krispy kreme donuts for the bun...

Well, I'm thinking of an unfrosted one -- just the basic batter fried, then instead of icing, having the gravy and cheese.

I think it would work, with the sweetness of the dough balanced out by the savory of the gravy. Sort of like a honey ham or maple bacon. (I usually have a pretty good sense of these things.)

chud_666
08-22-2015, 08:33 PM
A sentence that I feel like I can state with confidence has never before been uttered.

Do you really, though? Do you really?

Double Dracula
08-23-2015, 09:36 PM
Well, I'm thinking of an unfrosted one -- just the basic batter fried, then instead of icing, having the gravy and cheese.

I think it would work, with the sweetness of the dough balanced out by the savory of the gravy.

My mouth is watering reading about this, so it passes the first test.

(I am, however, Canadian, and therefore biased(?).)

teg
09-06-2015, 07:27 PM
I could really go for some fiddleheads.

Karzac
09-07-2015, 09:50 PM
Oh man, fiddleheads are awesome. So seasonal though.

Falselogic
09-07-2015, 09:51 PM
what's a fiddlehead?

Torzelbaum
09-07-2015, 10:44 PM
This (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiddlehead_fern).

Falselogic
09-07-2015, 11:35 PM
This (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiddlehead_fern).

You can get those in the States too... Anywhere ferns grow...

Karzac
09-08-2015, 08:19 AM
Well, yeah. Something being part of a regional cuisine doesn't mean it's exclusive to the region. See: hamburgers, hot dogs, apple pie and all manner of iconic American foods.

JBear
09-08-2015, 12:12 PM
Huh. That's news to me, actually. I thought fiddleheads were regional; I had no idea how ubiquitous they evidently are. I used to go fiddlehead picking with my dad when I was a boy. They're a really polarizing food; I don't know many people who don't either love them or hate them.

Anyway, I think they're delicious, and the season is short. I prefer mine with a nice hollandaise.

Johnny Unusual
09-22-2015, 12:36 AM
I can just cook 'em up with some lemon and their fine. But I understand: there are certain iron-rich veggies that sort of have a bit of a slight bitter taste. It's been a while since I've had them though. I'd love to have them again.