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MooMoo
02-28-2016, 12:28 PM
After an extensive 7 pages search I couldn't find a thread on this, so apologies if there is one.

What do you guys make for your lunches? I want to try and cut down on bread, but it's so damn good at being a vehicle for other foods. My staple at the moment is pesto pasta with a tomato or two thrown in for good measure. I only have a microwave and kettle in university, so I'm fairly reliant on reheatables or things that won't perish too quickly.

Got some good ideas for spicing up 12-1pm?

Solitayre
02-28-2016, 12:38 PM
I usually make a pot of soup on the weekends and that'll be my lunch for the next week.

MooMoo
02-28-2016, 12:40 PM
Soup is fine and all, but I find unless I accompany it with a bun (or maybe just eat a lot of it) it doesn't keep me full.

BŁge
02-28-2016, 01:33 PM
Most of the time I make a pot of something, or something I can separate easily into four to six meal portions. I usually hit up budgetbytes.com for ideas.

Solitayre
02-28-2016, 03:01 PM
I do a little dance every time someone on TT references Budgetbytes.

Violentvixen
02-28-2016, 05:59 PM
Another vote for soup, but I do make really hearty ones.

A bunch of apple slices, some cheese and peanut butter is good.

This tuna salad (http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/tuna-salad-celery-radishes-recipe) is great in warmer weather.

BŁge
02-28-2016, 06:47 PM
I do a little dance every time someone on TT references Budgetbytes.

I actually made these (http://www.budgetbytes.com/2015/04/mini-garden-turkey-loaves/) today.

madhair60
02-29-2016, 03:44 AM
I close my eyes and just thrust my arms out with a grabbing motion, and whatever ends up in my grip is what I eat.

--Posted from prison

Double Dracula
02-29-2016, 04:19 AM
Have you considered purchasing a rice cooker? They can be had fairly cheaply (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0001IWD7O/ref=s9_hps_bw_g201_i3?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-2&pf_rd_r=02K0QFA7FTDNK09YT1DG&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=506978747&pf_rd_i=3538364031), and rice goes well with just about everything.

MCBanjoMike
02-29-2016, 07:10 AM
Lunch is whatever I had for dinner last night - we always make enough to have leftovers.

Mr. Sensible
02-29-2016, 11:07 AM
Deli-style sandwiches have always been my go-to for lunches. I try to keep it interesting by using high-quality ingredients, like organic produce and fresh-sliced deli meat. The trickiest part is keeping leaf lettuce fresh; fortunately you can preserve most greens for a week or two by washing them, separating the dried leaves, rolling them up in a paper towel and then sticking them in a gallon zip-top bag with the air sucked out. I've heard keeping the greens sandwiched between paper towel layers in a hard plastic container also works well. Because I hate soggy sandwiches, I try to keep the "wet" and "dry" ingredients in different containers if I'm packing a lunch for later. Fast food-style condiment packets are also incredibly useful.

I also try to buy fresh-baked bread. Marble rye is my favorite, but stone-ground wheat and sourdough are good too. You can toast the bread before assembly if you're packing a lunch, or even make yourself a little hot sammy for immediate consumption. If you're trying to cut down on bread, you could also substitute a tortilla wrap or those "sandwich thins" they sell at supermarkets.

JBear
02-29-2016, 11:10 AM
-1 banana
-1 carrot
-1 container of whichever of blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, cherries, grapes or cherry tomatoes was cheapest that week
-1 snack bar

I usually eat at my desk while working, so an actual tasty or interesting lunch would just be wasted on me. This is fortunate, though, because I work in an office tower that's above a mall with a with a food court, and that might be difficult to resist otherwise. I used to also take a sandwich every day, but then I stopped and found that I didn't really miss it.

Another vote for soup, but I do make really hearty ones.

A bunch of apple slices, some cheese and peanut butter is good.
That... certainly sounds like a hearty soup, but not, I would think, a very palatable one. :p

MooMoo
02-29-2016, 12:03 PM
Have you considered purchasing a rice cooker? They can be had fairly cheaply (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0001IWD7O/ref=s9_hps_bw_g201_i3?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-2&pf_rd_r=02K0QFA7FTDNK09YT1DG&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=506978747&pf_rd_i=3538364031), and rice goes well with just about everything.

It's not recommended you reheat rice though, or so I heard?

MCBanjoMike
02-29-2016, 01:13 PM
It's not recommended you reheat rice though, or so I heard?

Weird, I'd never heard that before, but I looked it up and apparently it's true. But I think that if you promptly put leftovers in the fridge and reheat properly, it's fairly safe. I eat reheated rice at least 3 times a week and I never get sick from it.

Lakupo
02-29-2016, 09:58 PM
The Japanese build entire lunch bentos out of rice that sits at room temperature (with some additions, sometimes), so I wouldn't worry too much. Looking it up, it seems to be in roughly the same category of "put food away or it will go bad" food poisoning. I just think about the texture of some rice being lousy after the starches solidify in the fridge.

I don't have anything actually meaningful to say in this topic because I spend too much of my money eating out for lunch with my boyfriend and friends. :X

Torzelbaum
02-29-2016, 10:43 PM
The Japanese build entire lunch bentos out of rice that sits at room temperature (with some additions, sometimes)Don't the Japanese normally use vinegar when making rice?

Lakupo
03-01-2016, 12:25 AM
Vinegar in rice turns it into sushi rice, s. I've seen one or two life hack-style recipes that add a small amount of vinegar to resist spoiling, but it's not traditional as far as I'm aware.

I've read but not confirmed that the umeboshi picked plum sitting in the rice in a traditional bento is the old way to keep the way to keep the rice fresh. Or the salty ingredients in a bento keep bacteria in check.

Rufferto
03-01-2016, 02:43 AM
The Japanese build entire lunch bentos out of rice that sits at room temperature (with some additions, sometimes), so I wouldn't worry too much. Looking it up, it seems to be in roughly the same category of "put food away or it will go bad" food poisoning. I just think about the texture of some rice being lousy after the starches solidify in the fridge.

I don't have anything actually meaningful to say in this topic because I spend too much of my money eating out for lunch with my boyfriend and friends. :X

I cover my rice with a wet paper towel before reheating in the microwave and it's about good as new. I only eat jasmine rice though, so your mileage may vary.

Beefy Hits
03-02-2016, 07:40 AM
Usually a wrap made of a tortilla or bagel, cheese, pepporini, salami, mustard.

Sometimes peanut butter on a bagel.
Other times it's soup.

R^2
03-02-2016, 10:34 AM
You "don't reheat rice" because it gets dry and unpleasantly crunchy. If you take measures to avoid that, day-old rice is fine.

Ample Vigour
03-02-2016, 01:04 PM
You "don't reheat rice" because it gets dry and unpleasantly crunchy. If you take measures to avoid that, day-old rice is fine.

rice has to dry up a little before you can fry it

Ample Vigour
03-09-2016, 11:19 AM
[tune of neo contra theme] TACO SALADDDDDD

Paul le Fou
03-10-2016, 04:44 PM
I freeze my leftover rice. Keeps moisture in the container for reheating instead of drying it out in the fridge.

Don't the Japanese normally use vinegar when making rice?

No

They don't




As for my lunch, I'm barely functional enough to cook dinner for myself, preparing a lunch ahead of time is right out. I just grab something at the cafe/store I'm at usually when I get hungry. (goodbye all of my money forever)

Patrick
03-10-2016, 05:36 PM
I've been making a salad (usually including some leftovers) or a sandwich, a little cup of greek yogurt & frozen berries, and some kind of granola or popcorn thing. Worst case scenario I at least make a pb&j and buy some chips to eat with it.

Johnny Unusual
03-16-2016, 11:10 PM
Came up with a new grilled cheese strategy. I always hate how long I have to wait for the cheese to melt even when the bread is perfectly cooked. So no I cook one side of bread then then have it facing inside the sandwich, then cook the remaining two sides so that it will melt the cheese much faster.

pudik
03-17-2016, 02:25 PM
stick a single wick running the length of the sandwich, through the cheese

JBear
03-18-2016, 07:05 AM
I have no idea what "wick" could mean in this context. Unless it just mean the only thing that I know wick to mean, in which case I'm just confused. Why are you making grilled cheese candles?

Droewyn
03-18-2016, 09:18 AM
Big pots of soup are my go-to, hearty stuff like split pea or black bean. Sometimes I do deli sandwiches, but when I do that I always pack the ingredients to be assembled at work because soggy bread sucks.

Next week I'm thinking I'll do corned beef with a couple sides.

Mr. Sensible
03-18-2016, 11:21 AM
Sometimes I do deli sandwiches, but when I do that I always pack the ingredients to be assembled at work because soggy bread sucks.

I ate way too many pre-made PB&J sandwiches for lunch as a schoolchild, and that interminable mass of wet bread still haunts me to this day.

However, you can usually pack the cheese and meat between your bread slices without much sog; but any sort of spread, condiments or wet veggies MUST be separate lest sogginess ensue.

Mightyblue
03-18-2016, 01:55 PM
I generally lightly toast the bread I make sandwiches with, which dries them out enough that soaking them in damp veggies (or lots of brown mustard in my general case) just restores them to before.