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View Full Version : How can I find out what kind of RAM my computer takes?


Bergasa
07-18-2008, 08:16 AM
As the title says. I think there are different kinds right? I want to buy some more, is there a way of checking this without cracking open the case? (It's a PC tower btw).

djSyndrome
07-18-2008, 08:26 AM
As the title says. I think there are different kinds right? I want to buy some more, is there a way of checking this without cracking open the case? (It's a PC tower btw).

If it's a cookie cutter, you should be able to look on the manufacturer's website using the model number (likely on the back of the case).

If it's a custom build, boot the machine and try to get the motherboard ID. From there you can go to the manufacturer's website and look up what kind of RAM it supports.

If you're running 32-Bit Windows XP or certain flavors of Vista, bear in mind that no matter how much you stuff in there, the OS won't see more than 3GB.

Bergasa
07-18-2008, 08:27 AM
It is a custom. Any idea how to get to the motherboard ID?

djSyndrome
07-18-2008, 08:43 AM
It is a custom. Any idea how to get to the motherboard ID?

On boot, is there a logo at the top-left of the screen? It's often just underneath there.

Barring that, you could always open it up and look for the ID on the board itself.

Bergasa
07-18-2008, 08:50 AM
Alright I will try this a little later on. Thanks for the help!

shivam
07-18-2008, 09:05 AM
just open the box. it's a tower, so you only have to remove two screws and slide the left panel off. you're gonna need to do this to add new ram anyway.

DANoWAR
07-18-2008, 09:09 AM
If it's custom built, do you have the mainboard manual? If you do, just look for the specs...

(of course you won't have the manual...)

SDMX
07-18-2008, 09:10 AM
If it's custom built, do you have the mainboard manual? If you do, just look for the specs...

(of course you won't have the manual...)

Bahahaha... who has the manual?

Certainly not me.

Bergasa
07-18-2008, 09:13 AM
If it's custom built, do you have the mainboard manual? If you do, just look for the specs...

(of course you won't have the manual...)

I might, I'll have to check.

ALSO: Here is another question for you guys. My Hard Drive is full, so I am looking at getting a new one. Would you recommend an external or internal, and is there an easy way of transferring my existing stuff to the new, bigger one?

djSyndrome
07-18-2008, 09:17 AM
I might, I'll have to check.

ALSO: Here is another question for you guys. My Hard Drive is full, so I am looking at getting a new one. Would you recommend an external or internal, and is there an easy way of transferring my existing stuff to the new, bigger one?

Internal, and yes, there are imaging programs you can use to do copy one drive to another. Although depending on the age of your Windows installation you may be better off just reformatting and re-installing everything.

Daremo
07-18-2008, 09:18 AM
Whenever I buy a new drive I always start from scratch and reinstall everything and keep the old drive as a backup for a little while. You can make the old drive a slave, or if it is a SATA drive just plug it into the second SATA plug after you have finished the OS install. Then just move your files back to the new drive. Programs will have to be reinstalled, and in some cases settings are not recovered unless you know how to dig into the hidden settings files in your documents folder. Nothing like a clean copy of windows though. I swear the OS rots like a bad fruit as an installation ages.

Edit: Just be sure to turn the power off before switching hard drives. Even when adding secondary SATA drives it is a good idea to do this. Some SATA devices seem to work fine when hot swapping, but I have seen the results of when they don't too...

shivam
07-18-2008, 09:34 AM
hard drives these days come with discs that let you clone old drives over. It's smooth and simple.

and not only should your power be off, but your computer should be unplugged. There's no reason to be sloppy about this.

But yeah, it's super easy to clone a drive.

DANoWAR
07-18-2008, 09:38 AM
I might, I'll have to check.

ALSO: Here is another question for you guys. My Hard Drive is full, so I am looking at getting a new one. Would you recommend an external or internal, and is there an easy way of transferring my existing stuff to the new, bigger one?

Depends...What HD size do you have now, do you think your space will only shrink in time, do you have a server, do you have USB2.0/Firewire/eSATA?

I would recommend the MyBook series of Western Digital (http://www.wdc.com/en/products/productcatalog.asp?t=2).

Because I like fast, mobile access to mucho macho size.

EDIT: Oh, of course there is the question: Do you want to reinstall your system? Do you want to install it onto the new hard drive? Maybe then you should buy an internal solution. But still, Western Digital or Seagate is the way to go.

Mightyblue
07-18-2008, 10:42 AM
Yeah, I just pick up a new Seagate portable drive whenever I need more space, since it's handier because I need to switch around computers a lot at times.

SlimJimm
07-18-2008, 11:06 AM
Last time I used this memory scanner (http://www.crucial.com/systemscanner/) and ordered a few sticks of RAM a few years back.