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ravinoff
07-31-2008, 09:59 PM
I love short stories just as much as I love novels, but good discussion or even recommendations of short stories seems much rarer than the equivalent for novels. I guess this is me trying to counter that a little, by discussing some of my favorites from a number of genres.

Jorge Luis Borges
Not only my favorite short story author but one of my top 3 authors period. Probably Argentina's most famous writer. Some of his stories are metaphysical or philosophical horror stories, and he seems to have had a underlying fear of mirrors and the concept of infinity (in many incarnations, be it infinite life, infinite space, or even just the abstract concept). In contrast many of his stories concern rural and gaucho lifestyles in Argentina, complete with bandits, revolutionaries and plenty of knife fights. Borges loved to play with literary form and presentation and while he himself is classified as a modernist some of his work in this area certainly presages postmodernism (example: he never wrote any novels, but sometimes when he had an idea for a novel he would pretend it was already written and write either a review or a literary criticism of it). Some personal favorites:

Tlon Uqbar: Orbis Tertius: A epistemological horror story concerning the idealism of Berkeley.

The Immortal: A story concerning the implications of immortality.

Library of Babel: http://jubal.westnet.com/hyperdiscordia/library_of_babel.html I'll let the story speak for itself, its quite short (the above isn't my favorite translation, but its not bad).

The Garden of Forking Paths: A story thats central concept is strikingly similar to the many worlds theory of quantum mechanics, even though it predates that by a number of years.


G.K. Chesterton
Chesterton wrote everything from novels to poetry to essays on all the topics of his day but what we are concerned with here is his Father Brown stories. I am generally not a big fan of mystery fiction (well unless its really noir-ish or melded with another genre) but I make a major exception for the Father Brown stories, they are so fucking fantastic. The stories are full of wit, humor, beautiful prose and extremely well crafted mystery. I'm not gonna list any specifics but instead will link to the Project Gutenberg version of the first collection if Father Brown stories: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/204


Gene Wolfe
Gene Wolfe is a science fiction/fantasy writer best known for his The Book of the New Sun series. His writings very commonly have major themes dealing with personal identity and the nature of memory. While Wolfe's work is perfectly satisfying to read strictly on the surface level there are usually enigmas and depths to explore. Wolfe plays fair, he gives you the information to put things together. What he doesn't do is coddle you, he's probably only going to say something once. Some favorites:

Golden City Far: Won a Locus award. In many ways a parallel of Wolfe's Wizard Knight pair of novels (although not in any way directly connected). A coming of age story, with swords and stuff.

A Solar Labyrinth: A story concerning a labyrinth of a most unusual construction.

Parkroads: A rather Borgesian story, in the form of a movie review.

Redwood Coast Roamer: A set of four extremely short stories (one and a half pages each or so), the first of which is my probably my favorite thing Wolfe has written.


James Joyce
Not really gonna say much on Joyce, there is certainly no lack of writing about the man's work. I will say that the final short story in Dubliners, The Dead, is one of my all time favorite short stories; mainly due to its ending.


Samuel Delany
Another great science fiction author. Often deals with language and human sexuality. I strongly recommend Empire Star, at around 90 pages I guess its a novella and not a short story but oh well. Empire Star reminds me of a Celtic knot in structure, zoomed in so close that you can't see the knot, you can only follow the strand of the knot you are on. Near the end of it the focus pulls back, and you can see the knot as a whole, and how it weaves into itself over and over.

I am looking forward for recommendations of other good short fiction.

Dizzy
07-31-2008, 10:17 PM
Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery."
No details. Just read it. The less you know, the better.

dussssstin
07-31-2008, 10:18 PM
Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery."
No details. Just read it. The less you know, the better.

i had to read this in class. i liked it a lot. i was then known as the effed up kid.

ravinoff
07-31-2008, 10:22 PM
Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery."
No details. Just read it. The less you know, the better.

That is a great story. I need to reread it, its been probably 10 years or more since the last time I did

shivam
07-31-2008, 11:06 PM
ernest hemingway. say what you will about the man's novels; his short stories are among the best in the language.

Figure Four
07-31-2008, 11:15 PM
Ray Bradbury is probably my favorite short story author. Of the collections I've read I'd recommend the Illustrated Man because it contains my favorite short story ever, "Kaleidoscope." Though you can't really go wrong when you're reading Bradbury.

I'd also recommend "A Study in Emerald," by Neil Gaiman. It's Sherlock Holmes and Lovecraft crossover fiction and it is awesome.

ravinoff
07-31-2008, 11:30 PM
shivam: While I have mixed feelings about his novels (liked Old Man and the Sea, didn't care for the Sun Also Rises) I have never read his short fiction, I shall rectify that.

Figure Four: A Study In Emerald is a great story, Gaiman's short stories in general are very entertaining. Another Gaiman story with ties to Lovecraft's mythos is Shoggoth's Old Peculiar.

shivam's suggestion of Hemingway reminds me of another truly exceptional author of short fiction, Herman Melville. Melville's short fiction contain most of his strengths and very few of his weaknesses. Anyone who tried to read Moby Dick and enjoyed the prose but got bored with the story, or the pacing of the story I strongly suggest looking into Melville's short stories and novellas.

Issun
07-31-2008, 11:34 PM
I can't help noticing this thread lacks H.P. Lovecraft as anything but a comparison. I suggest reading the man himself. If you haven't already.

Tomm Guycot
08-01-2008, 12:38 AM
"On Meeting the 100% Perfect Woman" by Haruki Murakami
(title might be slightly different, but you'll know it when you see it)

This is the best short story ever.

Other than that, Hemingway's stuff.

Gredlen
08-01-2008, 12:52 AM
Isaac Asimov's The Last Question (http://www.multivax.com/last_question.html).

Paul le Fou
08-01-2008, 01:05 AM
"A Primer for the Punctuation of Heart Disease" by Jonathan Safran Foer was a really good one we read in class. Kind of experimental but it works.

nunix
08-01-2008, 01:06 AM
Cordwainer Smith. You can get it all in the combined volume The Rediscovery of Man (http://www.amazon.com/Rediscovery-Man-Complete-Science-Cordwainer/dp/0915368560/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1217573990&sr=8-1). Check your library, or just order it straight. In particular:

Mark Elf
Scanners Live in Vain
The Lady Who Sailed The Soul
Think Blue, Count Two
The Game of Rat and Dragon
The Dead Lady of Clown Town

estragon
08-01-2008, 01:22 AM
Most everything by Akutagawa Ryunosuke.

I've been reading a lot of him recently, and I've been really impressed by almost all of it. They're also almost all really, really short, so you have no excuse not to read read him. They range from bizarre supernatural/mythological stuff to crime dramas to original fairy tales to fables to fairly straightforward realism and everything in between, so there's something for everyone.

If you're a Japanese speaker, you can even read him for free on Aozora Bunko (www.aozora.gr.jp/)).

If you only read one, try "In a Grove (藪の中)," which was the basis for the movie Rashomon. (His story "Rashomon" was, fairly obviously, also another source for the movie, but "In a Grove" is actually where most of the plot and the structure comes from.) I don't want to say anything about this if somehow you've both managed to never read this story or see Rashomon, because the basic premise is fun enough that it's best not to spoil it.

Dhroo
08-01-2008, 03:05 AM
I can't help noticing this thread lacks H.P. Lovecraft as anything but a comparison. I suggest reading the man himself. If you haven't already.

And if anyone needs something more specific than that, I'd have to recommend "The Rats in the Walls." Definitely my favorite Lovecraft story, and not just because one of the chapters of Eternal Darkness is clearly heavily influenced by it.

In 7th grade-ish, I remember reading a Vonnegut short story that left a pretty big impression on me. I can't remember the title, but it was about a future where the talented and gifted are handicapped so that everyone in society is equal. This sound familiar to anyone?

Rosencrantz
08-01-2008, 03:30 AM
My favorite short story is Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron (http://instruct.westvalley.edu/lafave/hb.html).

pence
08-01-2008, 05:03 AM
Great short stories? Ender's Game (http://www.incwell.com/ipulp/endersGAME/index.html) comes to mind, does that count?

nadia
08-01-2008, 05:26 AM
My favorite short story is Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron (http://instruct.westvalley.edu/lafave/hb.html).

There was a super low-budget Canadian movie adaptation of Harrison Bergeron. A family friend had a bit part in it.

kaisel
08-01-2008, 05:30 AM
In 7th grade-ish, I remember reading a Vonnegut short story that left a pretty big impression on me. I can't remember the title, but it was about a future where the talented and gifted are handicapped so that everyone in society is equal. This sound familiar to anyone?

My favorite short story is Kurt Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron.

I had to read Harrison Bergeron for a college English class, it was pretty good.

I was always fond of Ursula Le Guin's One Who Walks Away from Omelas.

The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brian is a pretty good Vietnam War short story as well, from what I remember.

Balrog
08-01-2008, 07:04 AM
"The Interlopers" by Saki (Hector Hugh Munro) is one of my favorites. Actually, any of his short stories are pretty solid.

Dadgum Roi
08-01-2008, 07:18 AM
Sam Shepard has a couple of short story collections out that I like a lot- Cruising Paradise and Great Dream of Heaven, with the former being the better of the two. They're like the distilled essence of his plays, if you're familiar with them.

Sprite
08-01-2008, 07:59 AM
ernest hemingway. say what you will about the man's novels; his short stories are among the best in the language.

Yeah, this. "Nothing happens" is a terrible concept for a novel but a delicious concept for a short story.

ajr82
08-01-2008, 09:12 AM
Ray Bradbury is probably my favorite short story author. Of the collections I've read I'd recommend the Illustrated Man because it contains my favorite short story ever, "Kaleidoscope." Though you can't really go wrong when you're reading Bradbury.

Much as I like The Martian Chronicles and parts of The Illustrated Man, I think you absolutely can go wrong with Bradbury if you're reading most of the stuff in I Sing The Body Electric, which I hated.

As far as Lovecraft, my favourites are The Colour Out of Space and The Whisperer In Darkness, though they may be a bit too long to qualify as short stories, and I'm not starting a novellas thread. Oh, also, The Statement of Randolph Carter still creeps me out.

As for my favourite short story author, I might go with Franz Kafka. The Complete Stories is an amazing book.

Red Hedgehog
08-01-2008, 10:46 AM
Not mentioned yet:

I recently read a collection of Robert Zelazny's short stories and they were some of the best Sci-Fi stuff I had read in short form.

Dizzy
08-01-2008, 10:56 AM
I was given a collection of Hemingway's short stories for Christmas, and boy are they boring. Tales of hunting, gambling, fishing, cooking, fur skinning and other outdoors stuff with maybe some drama about a pregnancy or a man disagreeing with his wife on something. I can't recall all of it accurately now, but I must have received all of Hemingway's more boring stories that I wouldn't want to read and labor through again. They were written when he was really young, so that might be it.

I'm trying to remember that Flannery O'Conner story where the family gets murdered by a God-worshipping hitchhiker.

ravinoff
08-01-2008, 11:12 AM
estragon: Rashomon and In a Grove are the only two Akutagawa Ryunosuke stories I have read, they were both in a little booklet that came with the Criterion DVD of Rashomon. I have always intended on reading more because those were two excellent stories.

ajr82: I can't believe I forgot Kafka in my initial post, holy crap are his stories mind searingly fantastic. He is truly one of the masters of the short story format.

dizzy: I think the Flannery O'Connor story you are referring to might be A Good Man is Hard to Find, except I don't remember the murderer being a hitchhiker or a god worshiper, so maybe not. I find the pervading nihilism present in O'Connor's writing interesting considering she was a devout Catholic.

shivam
08-01-2008, 11:23 AM
Hemingway is a man's man, and writes about manly things. Yes, they don't really talk about much, but his artistry is evident. One of my favorite stories by him, for instance, features a scene where the hero slices into an onion and makes it into a sandwich. yes, it seems ridiculously mundane, but man, it was a super evocative scene.

also, Joyce's Arabesque is my favorite by him.

Kishi
08-01-2008, 11:37 AM
Edgar Allan Poe -- particularly his seminal work in detective fiction, which usually gets overshadowed by his horror stuff. If you didn't already read it in high school, check out "The Murders of the Rue Morgue."

Add to Queue's VsRobot
08-01-2008, 11:48 AM
Richard Matheson and Robert Bloch are both masters of the format.

Tavir
08-01-2008, 11:54 AM
Ray Bradbury's All Summer In a Day (http://www.westburyfriends.org/online/ela/giver/all%20summer%20reading.pdf) is one of my favorites. Please read it if you have yet to, it's very short, only about 4 pages long.

Also, if you've been heard a reference to "hunting the most dangerous game....MAN!!" in a movie or show (like The Simpsons), they can all be traced back to this story: The Most Dangerous Game (http://fiction.eserver.org/short/the_most_dangerous_game.html), by Richard Connell. It's not great, but it's an interesting concept. My 8th grade teacher said once we read it, we'd never forget it, and I haven't, but only because I keep seeing it show up in pop culture every now and then.

I can't find a link to it, but I really enjoyed Harlan Ellison's "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream".

ajr82
08-01-2008, 11:58 AM
Edgar Allan Poe -- particularly his seminal work in detective fiction, which usually gets overshadowed by his horror stuff. If you didn't already read it in high school, check out "The Murders of the Rue Morgue."

I don't know, Rue Morgue is pretty good, but I don't see any reason why anyone would ever want to read "The Mystery of Marie Roget".

Sven
08-01-2008, 12:56 PM
Sherlock Holmes probably merits a thread all to itself for this type of thing.

(Personally, Red-Headed League is my favourite, just because it's so... whimsical.)

KCar
08-01-2008, 12:57 PM
You know, I'm not convinced that Borges isn't the only writer a person needs.

Calorie Mate
08-01-2008, 01:12 PM
"On Meeting the 100% Perfect Woman" by Haruki Murakami
(title might be slightly different, but you'll know it when you see it)

This is the best short story ever.

I came in here to post this, but I assumed you would have beaten me to the punch. I was not disappointed.

blakegli
08-01-2008, 01:42 PM
SF:
- I second the Cordwainer Smith recommend, especially "Alpha Ralpha Boulevard".
- Jack Vance is often criminally overlooked (in both short and long fiction)
- Ursula K. LeGuin has already been mentioned, but her collection Orsinian Tales never fails to blow my mind
- No one writes better crafted SF short stories than Connie Willis <-- this is a fact

"Classics"
- Much love for Saki
- Also KIPLING: "The Man Who Would Be King" enough said.
- Like Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne's short fiction is much more accessible
- Faulkner writes a mean short story too , especially the English class standby "A Rose for Emily"

Modernish
- Junot Diaz's collection Drown is excellent
- Thirds for Murakami
- Not enough people know about Ralph Lombreglia and it is a shame. Special recommend: "Late Early Man"
- Gao Xingjian earned his nobel prize in literature
- Roald Dahl's "Beware of the Dog" can make you forget that he also wrote James and the Giant Peach, Matilda, et al.
- Gabriel Garcia Marquez is magical realism at it's finest. "Last Voyage of the Ghost Ship" is the longest sentence I have ever read.

Tomm Guycot
08-01-2008, 02:09 PM
"On Meeting the 100% Perfect Woman" by Haruki Murakami
(title might be slightly different, but you'll know it when you see it)

This is the best short story ever.

Oh man, you don't even have to leave the internet (http://www.mat.upm.es/~jcm/murakami-perfect.html)!

ravinoff
08-01-2008, 03:17 PM
I recently read a collection of Robert Zelazny's short stories and they were some of the best Sci-Fi stuff I had read in short form.
Have you read A Rose for Ecclesiastes? Thats my favorite Zelazny short story.

I can't find a link to it, but I really enjoyed Harlan Ellison's "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream".
Another one I completely forgot about, Ellison is one of the best short story authors in science fiction. His nonfiction is also great if you want extremely well written angry rantings.

You know, I'm not convinced that Borges isn't the only writer a person needs.
Heh, well in a stupid YOU CAN ONLY HAVE ONE BOOK EVAR thought experiment I'd have a real hard time choosing between the complete Borges stories and Joyce's Ulysses.

Oh man, you don't even have to leave the internet (http://www.mat.upm.es/~jcm/murakami-perfect.html)!
Hadn't read that before, it was great, thanks. Murakami is always a lot of fun.

Secret Punch
08-01-2008, 03:48 PM
I knew "The Lottery" would probably be mentioned in the first or second post here, but I want to note that pretty much anything by Shirley Jackson is pure gold. That includes The Haunting of Hill House, which was adapted into The Haunting, which was of course a pale, pale shadow of the original. Her work is funny, bleak, biting, beautiful, and rendered in some of the most perfect, crisp, humble sentences any writer has ever written. I can't recommend her collected short fiction highly enough.

I haven't read her memoirs, though. I'll get to it someday.

ravinoff
08-01-2008, 05:11 PM
KCar: I would doubly recommend G.K. Chesterton to any fan of Borges, as Borges himself was a huge fan of Chesterton. Its not a short story but my favorite work by Chesterton is The Man Who Was Thursday, a spy novel containing equal portions madcap adventures and philosophical arguments. I disagree with Chesterton's religious and philosophical stances but that in no way detracts from my love of his writing.

Mightyblue
08-01-2008, 05:56 PM
You should always read things that you don't agree with, as it forces you to think critically about what you believe and why.*


*For this to work of course, you need to take the material seriously, so there's that caveat.

taidan
08-01-2008, 06:10 PM
I've always enjoyed The Gift of the Magi.

Also, Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell.

Surprised no one mentioned Leningan VS the Ants.

Ample Vigour
08-01-2008, 06:13 PM
I find the pervading nihilism present in O'Connor's writing interesting considering she was a devout Catholic.

Nihilism? Bleak, yes, but nihilistic?

EDIT: Robert E. Howard, America's favorite mama's boy, did a shitload of stuff about a shirtless dude from central Europe, but you can skip right over that into his Sailor Steve Costigan work. That's the best pulp fiction ever written, so far as I can tell.

ravinoff
08-01-2008, 06:33 PM
Nihilism? Bleak, yes, but nihilistic?
Well, that was my read on her work, yes. Thinking further the word 'pervading' is probably too strong a term considering I have read none of her novels and only about half of one of her short story collections (the collection in question being A Good Man is Hard to Find).

Dizzy
08-01-2008, 06:48 PM
You should always read things that you don't agree with, as it forces you to think critically about what you believe and why.*


*For this to work of course, you need to take the material seriously, so there's that caveat.

I DON'T CARE ANYMORE. I'M RIGHT AND YOU'RE WRONG DAMMIT.

I am guilty of this though, sometimes I read too much of what I like and not enough of what I don't like--books about female corporate executives trying to keep body and soul together during a tumultuous divorce or some such.

Balrog
08-01-2008, 09:29 PM
"Classics"
- Much love for Saki


Okay, this is two votes for Saki. Get reading, guys.

dwolfe
08-01-2008, 10:16 PM
Zelazny. Anything Zelazny.

Violentvixen
08-01-2008, 10:38 PM
JAMES HERRIOT. So absolutely wonderful. I cried when he died.

Sherlock Holmes probably merits a thread all to itself for this type of thing.

(Personally, Red-Headed League is my favourite, just because it's so... whimsical.)

That is a bizarre one! But yes, A+ to Holmes in general.

I highly recommend Chekhov's short stories. Really good writing.

Jack London is also fantastic although often depressing.

Adrenaline
08-01-2008, 11:39 PM
In 7th grade-ish, I remember reading a Vonnegut short story that left a pretty big impression on me. I can't remember the title, but it was about a future where the talented and gifted are handicapped so that everyone in society is equal. This sound familiar to anyone?

In case you didn't realize, your question was indirectly answered, it's Harrison Burgeron.

dwolfe
08-02-2008, 12:03 AM
Ian Fleming's original Bond novels are very short, and a couple are short story collections. Recommended.

Eusis
08-02-2008, 12:23 AM
I can't really speak on much here, I have Neil Gaiman's Smoke & Mirrors and checked out Gene Wolfe's Castle of Days from the library and read a few from both, but I haven't gone through very many short stories. However, Sci Fi (http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/archive.html) had apparently been posting various short stories for a few years, and they even have one that I've read out of Castle of Days, Paul's Treehouse.

Of those posted I've only read Haruki Murakami's 100% perfect girl story, I've wanted to read his stuff but didn't want to go through Hard Boiled Wonderland & The End of the World before finishing A Game of Thrones, and I'm stupid about finishing books.

ravinoff
08-02-2008, 01:01 AM
However, Sci Fi (http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/archive.html) had apparently been posting various short stories for a few years, and they even have one that I've read out of Castle of Days, Paul's Treehouse.

Hmm...actually there are a bunch of Wolfe stories published on various websites, and had I remembered that I would have included some in my initial post. Free awesome fiction for all who seek it:
Memorare - http://www.sfsite.com/fsf/fiction/gw01.htm
The Arimaspian Legacy - http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/stories/arimaspian.htm
Unrequited Love - http://subterraneanpress.com/index.php/magazine/summer-2007/fiction-unrequited-love-by-gene-wolfe/
Under Hill - http://www.infinitematrix.net/stories/shorts/under_hill.html
Copperhead - http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/originals/originals_archive/wolfe/wolfe1.html
Castaway - http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/originals/originals_archive/wolfe2/wolfe21.html
Easter Sunday - http://www.revolutionsf.com/article.php?id=1799
The Case of the Vanishing Ghost - http://www.revolutionsf.com/article.php?id=1688


Another superb author of short fiction is Vladimir Nabokov. While overall I find his novels superior to his short fiction thats like saying I like super extremely great better than merely extremely great. My favorite Nabokov short story is probably Terror. (Totally disregarding that fact that I created this post for short fiction I am going suggest anyone who loves words read Nabokov's Pale Fire. one of the best books ever, featuring the greatest pompous asshole in all of fiction)

Issun
08-02-2008, 02:51 AM
Oh man, you don't even have to leave the internet (http://www.mat.upm.es/~jcm/murakami-perfect.html)!

That was wonderful. Thank you very much for the link.

locit
08-02-2008, 03:11 AM
The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six More, by Roald Dahl. Most Roald Dahl books are basically short stories (at least I usually read them in one sitting), but these are really some of his best work, and at times a lot darker that most of his other stuff. They cover such a wide variety of topics and moods that it's hard to read through them and not be completely satisfied. And one of them is even true! I think!

Favourites: The Swan, The Hitch-hiker, well all of them really. But mostly those two.

Dhroo
08-02-2008, 08:59 AM
In case you didn't realize, your question was indirectly answered, it's Harrison Burgeron.

Heh, don't worry, I caught that, thanks.

I'm kind of surprised no one's mentioned Anton Chekov's "The Bet" yet(unless I missed it). Another short story that everyone reads at some point during middle or high school.

Mightyblue
08-02-2008, 10:07 AM
Man, you guys must have had some nice English classes. The only things we read were a couple of Shakespeare plays and Cyrano de Bergerac. We'd spend a couple of weeks reading and going over each one, and it was sheer torture because I'd be done reading anything assigned within a day or two.

I don't even remember what we did for the rest of the time. I spent most of my class time in high school reading books unless it was a math or science class.

nadia
08-02-2008, 12:10 PM
Flowers for Algernon is one of the best-evar short stories out there. There's also a great novel-length adaptation, though you can kind of smell the filler.

When he worked at the Toronto Star, Hemmingway wrote a short story/article about the oak trees in Toronto's High Park dying from the inside-out because of pollution. This is relevant because one of those very same oak trees recently fell down and nearly killed a bunch of kids.

It was kind of a dry story, though, despite the grim prophecy. I lost interest halfway through.

People say I suck because I like Stephen King, but The Mist is still one of my favourite short stories (more of a novella). It inspired Half-Life, so you know it's grand. Skeleton Crew is a good short story collection.

nadia
08-02-2008, 12:14 PM
Man, you guys must have had some nice English classes. The only things we read were a couple of Shakespeare plays and Cyrano de Bergerac. We'd spend a couple of weeks reading and going over each one, and it was sheer torture because I'd be done reading anything assigned within a day or two.

I don't even remember what we did for the rest of the time. I spent most of my class time in high school reading books unless it was a math or science class.

Reading was probably the only thing I cared about in school. People thought I was a nut because while they were slowly wending their way through the first book of the Tripod Trilogy in grade 8, I had already asked my teacher for book two and three, and finished them within two days.

There was one English teacher in my high school who genuinely cared about students doing more than reading slowly out loud from books they hated. Unfortunately, I never got her; we would have to spend lunch hours talking about books. I got stuck with a coke addict who would give us a month of class time to write a six-hundred word essay on Othello.

Dadgum Roi
08-02-2008, 12:29 PM
That Murakami story reminded me of an infographic on The Onion; "Who Would We Rather Be Married To?". One of the choices was "Woman in white dress stepping off ferry forty years ago". :D

Matchstick
08-04-2008, 12:20 AM
People say I suck because I like Stephen King, but The Mist is still one of my favourite short stories (more of a novella). It inspired Half-Life, so you know it's grand. Skeleton Crew is a good short story collection.

Stephen King was better when his editor took a firmer hand with him. His short story collections (at least the early ones) are filled with enjoyable stuff. "This Mist" is a particular favorite of my wife and myself, but I'd agree that it's a novella more so than a story. "The Mangler", "Quitters, Inc.", and "The Raft" are also favorites.

I'm saddened by the lack of Raymond Carver in this thread. His collections Cathedral and What We Talk About When We Talk About Love are recommended. Some of the stories are almost just sketches and they can be bleak, but I find them mesmerizing.

I'll chime in on the recommendations for Shirley Jackson and James Joyce (Dubliners is probably my favorite collection of short stories).

The Ray Bradbury collection I usually recommend to people is The October Country which includes two of my particular favorites ("Uncle Einar" and "The Scythe").

Ellison has always been a favorite of mine. Recommendations include "Paladin of the Lost Hour", "Repent Harlequin, said the Ticktockman", and "The Crackpots".



I think I need to investigate this Borges character.

jeditanuki
08-04-2008, 08:47 AM
Not mentioned yet:

I recently read a collection of Robert Zelazny's short stories and they were some of the best Sci-Fi stuff I had read in short form.

While I enjoyed most everything Zelazny wrote to some degree, I think he mastered the Science Fiction/Fantasy short story

See also: King, Stephen - Horror short stories

Pajaro Pete
08-04-2008, 02:09 PM
"The Fix" by Percival Everett.

And just about anything from Sherman Alexie.

keele864
08-04-2008, 03:08 PM
Hmm...actually there are a bunch of Wolfe stories published on various websites, and had I remembered that I would have included some in my initial post. Free awesome fiction for all who seek it:
Memorare - http://www.sfsite.com/fsf/fiction/gw01.htm
The Arimaspian Legacy - http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/stories/arimaspian.htm
Unrequited Love - http://subterraneanpress.com/index.php/magazine/summer-2007/fiction-unrequited-love-by-gene-wolfe/
Under Hill - http://www.infinitematrix.net/stories/shorts/under_hill.html
Copperhead - http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/originals/originals_archive/wolfe/wolfe1.html
Castaway - http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/originals/originals_archive/wolfe2/wolfe21.html
Easter Sunday - http://www.revolutionsf.com/article.php?id=1799
The Case of the Vanishing Ghost - http://www.revolutionsf.com/article.php?id=1688


Not to thread-jack, but are you on the WolfeWiki or the Urth list? I post on the latter from time to time.

I don't read as many short stories as I should. Borges and Bradbury are great though. And I clearly like Wolfe way too much.

ravinoff
08-04-2008, 03:19 PM
Not to thread-jack, but are you on the WolfeWiki or the Urth list? I post on the latter from time to time.

I am an Urth list lurker.

juanfrugalj
08-05-2008, 09:49 PM
Gabriel García Márquez

Ojos de Perro Azul, from Ojos de Perro Azul - Worth a look if you know Spanish. As fas as I know, it hasn't been translated. Story about two lovers who meet in dreams, but are unable to find each other once they wake up. Bestest story evah.

Light Is Like Water, from Twelve Pilgrims - Two brothers improve their grades and receive a small boat as a prize. After that, they break some light bulbs when their parents aren't home, and sail on the light flowing out of them.

Franz Kafka

A Hunger Artist - Desperate autobiography? Ironic commentary? Nobody can tell!