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demonkoala
10-08-2008, 08:13 PM
Being a college student, my eating habits can be rather strange.
I like to think of myself as a rather good cook though. Cooking is fun and takes my mind off things, so I do as much of it as I can. I miss home cooking and considering I never get to see my parents, I make up for it by cooking for myself...

With that though, I do like new ideas. Just wondering what you guys eat on a regular basis.
New recipes are welcome.

I guess I'll start with what I made tonight. Finally got stuff together and made some good ole curry (wafuu)
http://www.onmyplate.org/hotei_katsucurry.jpg

DemoWeasel
10-08-2008, 08:16 PM
I can cook a mean bowl of cereal and not much else :(

Wolfgang
10-08-2008, 08:24 PM
This is another one of those "didn't we just do this?" things.

Tonight I'm having: garlic mashed potatoes (with gravy), cucumber salad and a pack of Transformers Animated fruit snacks. Not bad!

Guy
10-08-2008, 08:29 PM
Four or five weeks of SCAD's meal plan and I'm really missing homemade food. I'm shooting for one of the apartment-style dorms next year with kitchens so I can cook things. Until then, it's gonna be nothing but greasy crap day in and day out.

Merus
10-08-2008, 08:40 PM
I have meat and veg somewhat regularly. You get some meat (like a beef steak, or some lamb or pork - reasonable quality meat), then you cook it. I dry fry it, but you can grill it or barbecue it or whatever.

I then get some frozen veggies, and tip some out into a round, microwave-proof container. I have a bowl I use for this. You need a lid/plate to put on the bowl. You put a bit of water in there, then put it on high for about four minutes. When it's done, you have delicious veggies.

By this point the steak's probably done (hope you flipped it), so take it out and put it on a plate. Then put the veggies on. At this point you want to add some sauce for the moisture - we have these microwavable sauces here that do the trick, so pour some o' that on. And there you are! A proper meal.

I also made lasagne once. That was fun, but I think it really needs vegetables in it to be delicious. My mum uses spinach and tomato, I think that works.

Oh! Hamburgers are really easy and it is a crime if you cannot make them. You get some mince, then add an egg. 1 egg will do four patties, but you can do 1 egg for 2 patties if you want. Don't do 1 egg, one patty. It doesn't taste all that good. Add some spices if you have them, some pepper if you like that sort of thing, some salt if you want a heart attack in twenty years (it will be plenty tasty either way), and finally some flour to try and get the patty to stick together. (That's what the egg's for, but the flour does help.) Separate out your mince into balls, depending on how many patties you want.

Next, get your skillet/frypan/whatever it's called in your country. Put the patty balls on your pan, with a little bit of oil, and press down with an egglift. Once one side's cooked, flip it over. Do the next bit while you wait.

Time to fire up the griller to do the rolls. You can use special hamburger rolls, but I prefer getting slightly thicker rolls as the hamburger rolls are kind of thin and plasticky. Then again, I don't like white bread, so that might be it. Anyway! Cut your rolls in half then put them on the grill. Pull out what you're going to put on the hamburger. I suggest lettuce, in leaves about the size of your rolls, and tomato, sliced (to slice a tomato optimally, get a sharp knife and cut across its body, so you're left with one piece with the bottom, one piece with a hole, one piece with the stem and every other piece basically intact), but you can put on all sorts of things: cheese, which you put on the patty when you're doing the second side; butter, for the rolls; eggs, which you should start cooking soon after you start the patties; bacon, which you can leave until you flip; pineapple; beetroot; and of course sauce, like tomato sauce, ketchup and mayo. Pick one sauce and stick with it.

See, it's a burger, you can put whatever you want on it-- wait, you're letting your rolls burn. Pull them out, quick. A bit of charcoal, but that's okay, just cut it off. If you're putting a spread on your roll, do it now so it melts deliciously, then match up bottoms to tops and start assembling! I like the patty on the bottom and the lettuce on the top, but I've heard convincing arguments to do it the other way around, and put the bulky, light stuff on the bottom and the heavy bits on the top. Whatever works for you.

And there you have it! A burger! Enjoy it, it's pretty tasty.

Dizzy
10-08-2008, 09:00 PM
I'm a poor cook. Macaroni, eggs, grilled cheese, ramen noodles - these things I can make. If I learned how to make a rice and refried beans I'd be set for life.

I can't let this thread pass without a Ramsay clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BgeA2IifcM). (Moron misspelled starring.)

Sheana
10-08-2008, 09:14 PM
Four or five weeks of SCAD's meal plan and I'm really missing homemade food. I'm shooting for one of the apartment-style dorms next year with kitchens so I can cook things. Until then, it's gonna be nothing but greasy crap day in and day out.

Going off-campus or to the apartment-style newer dorms will be the best decision you ever make! I still have nightmares about SCAD's food. Except for the waffles. It's like they stole those from Waffle House or something.

I'm feeling lazy, so tonight I'm having a bagel.

Paul le Fou
10-08-2008, 09:28 PM
I've ben making milkshakes lately. Ice cream, fruit, some milk, and I win.

Reinforcements
10-09-2008, 06:16 AM
I love to cook, but don't get the chance very often. Alton Brown is my personal hero. I did make a mean fritata with some leftover vegetable stir-fry the other day.

Brickroad
10-09-2008, 08:34 AM
I've ben making milkshakes lately. Ice cream, fruit, some milk, and I win.

Milkshakes are always happening up in my crib. I may not know exactly what the correct answer is, but I'm certain the incorrect one is never "milkshake".

Bergasa
10-09-2008, 08:52 AM
I enjoy cooking, and I'm really starting to get into it recently. It was my mom's birthday the other day, so I made her a nice meal. Got a nice cut of steak, and rubbed a rub into it, then grilled it outside. Quartered some mini potatoes and put them on a pan, added salt, pepper, garlic powder, thyme, and olive oil, and cooked them in the oven until golden brown. Grilled some mushrooms, and made a fresh salad. White wine topped it all off. It came out really nice!

As for cooking shows, I love Jamie at Home, Iron Chef, Kitchen Nightmares, and Tyler's Ultimate.

demonkoala
10-09-2008, 02:24 PM
Oh! Hamburgers are really easy and it is a crime if you cannot make them.

I like this option, but I don't do it often enough. I think it's because there are a ton of really good burger places around here... I do have a ton of ground beef, so I think I may do this :P

Got a nice cut of steak, and rubbed a rub into it, then grilled it outside. Quartered some mini potatoes and put them on a pan, added salt, pepper, garlic powder, thyme, and olive oil, and cooked them in the oven until golden brown. Grilled some mushrooms, and made a fresh salad. White wine topped it all off. It came out really nice!


That sounds really delicious. I drooled a little.
It also reminds me of the time I made a fucking 20 lb brisket.
k, I need to control my glands now.

Wolfgang
10-09-2008, 03:07 PM
You bastards have to stop doing this. I just ate lunch!

Which, by the way, was a sandwich with chicken tenders on wheat, lettuce, swiss and buffalo sauce, with more of those damn smile potatoes I'm hooked on. So much more kickass than french fries.

mugenkokoro
10-09-2008, 03:17 PM
I've been really getting into cooking more lately (since I have all this unemployed free time). Last night I made ratatouille, and it turned out really well. I did a lot of things I hadn't done before, like chopping up a whole onion (IT BURNS, I was weeping involuntarily), peeling, chopping, and subsequently frying potatoes, and getting my boyfriend to actually eat onions. I also did some grilled chicken breasts on the side with a spice rub, but that's easy.

I think my favorite thing to do still is making omelets, because they're so easy and delicious.

There really are few things that give me a better feeling of satisfaction than cooking up good food, especially if it's something you haven't done before.

Still, there's no substitute quite like opening a can of Dr. Pepper and a bag of Doritos and pigging out every once in a while. =)

Wolfgang
10-09-2008, 03:36 PM
(IT BURNS, I was weeping involuntarily)

Do it under running water.

Egarwaen
10-09-2008, 04:17 PM
Do it under running water.

Or just do it quickly. If you've ever played Cooking Mama, pay attention to the way they get you to chop an onion. Not only does it actually work, it's fast and results in smaller pieces than most other methods I know of.

I really enjoy cooking. This is good, because I've got a nasty set of allergies (milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, shellfish) so most restaurant/take-out/other prepared food is out of the question. It's kind of time-consuming, but the results are so tasty that I don't exactly mind. I'll go back and post recipes for the things that have them once I get home.

My favorite is chili. It's quick to prepare and re-heats very well, and there's so many easy ways to vary it and get something that tastes quite different. In fact, it's something of a challenge to prevent myself from just making chili all the time, since I know I'll get sick of it eventually.

Meatballs are similarly useful. You can make them with pretty much any ground meat, you can season them with all kinds of spices, and you can eat them with any pasta, in a sandwich, or even just on their own. My current favorites use a pound of meat and a half teaspoon each of of Worchestershire sauce, oregano, basil, and Italian seasoning.

Savory meat pies are more work to make and less flexible, but just so tasty...

I really enjoy curries, but haven't made many since moving here. I really should take some time and check out the packaged curries in the local grocery stores.

Home-made pancakes are an unbeatable delivery vehicle for maple syrup.

Sheana
10-09-2008, 04:39 PM
I like this option, but I don't do it often enough. I think it's because there are a ton of really good burger places around here... I do have a ton of ground beef, so I think I may do this :P

I can make a burger at home that's tastier and fresher and, most importantly, cheaper than any burger I can buy at a fast food joint or restaurant. Excepting McDonald's (for price, that is), but I don't think they really count.

Sven
10-09-2008, 04:47 PM
On the Onion thing: while I CAN do it chef-style (halve along the vertical axis, cut into near-juliene with the stem holding everything together, slice into cubes), it's so much simpler to just haul out the chopper I got for $5.99 at Ashley's warehouse sale (this thing's a stainless-steel BADASS and an example of why Ashley's may well be the most dangerous place on earth for wannabe chefs) and let that do the dirty work. Sure, it's a little more uneven, but nothing I use onions in requires an even chop.

But if you're doing it manually: GET A GOOD KNIFE. Seriously, dull shitty knives are 90% of the reason you run into trouble. A good (German or Japanese) knife should decapitate an onion before you even get a chance to cry, since it should be effortless.

Pajaro Pete
10-09-2008, 06:14 PM
I'm trying to master Chinese Pepper Steak.

Dizzy
10-09-2008, 07:30 PM
Alright, I managed to make not sunny side up, but scrambled eggs mixed in the cheese. Next time I'll try to work in some vegetables... and yet I know I can go to the store and buy a carton of egg beaters all ready to go. Still!

Sanagi
10-09-2008, 08:06 PM
I can cook a mean bowl of cereal and not much else :(
This, but I can also nuke pizza rolls like a pro.

mugenkokoro
10-10-2008, 01:00 PM
Do it under running water.

Ooh! I'll have to try that.

I've got a pretty good and very all-purpose knife from Ikea, but it's gotten quite dull and I can't find a place to buy a knife-sharpener. =(

Sucks about your litany of allergies, Egarwaen, but it's cool to see that you've adapted well to it by learning to cook such a variety of deliciousness. I need to learn how to make curry other than using the Golden Curry bricks you can buy anywhere (so good but so bad for you).

demonkoala
10-10-2008, 05:29 PM
This, but I can also nuke pizza rolls like a pro.

I have something for you guys :D
The brownie in a mug!!

Gather:
4 tbsp flour
4 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp cocoa powder
2 tbsp water
2 tbsp oil

stick it all in a coffee mug

microwave for a minute and a half

Havn't tried it, but I heard it makes something delicious :) (I think I'll have to experiement later tonight)

Ample Vigour
10-10-2008, 05:38 PM
Advances in frozen skillet meals have rendered my attempts to learn cooking obsolete.

I have seen the future, and it is delicious.

ravinoff
10-12-2008, 03:00 PM
Here's an experiment I did today that turned out excellent. I took a basic beer bread recipe, used a blueberry flavored beer, upped the sugar in the recipe and added dried blueberries. This is gonna be breakfast the next several days.

Blueberry Beer Bread
3 cups self rising flour, sifted
1/2 cup sugar
3 tbsp vegetable oil
12 oz Sweetwater Blue (a light bodied ale with a pleasent blueberry flavor, more subtle than most fruity beers tend to be. Sweetwater is a local microbrewery)
1/2 cup dried blueberries

Whisk flour and sugar together. Add oil and beer. Stir until just mixed. Add dried blueberries and quickly mix. Pour batter into a greased loaf pan and place in an oven preheated to 350 degrees F. Bake for 55-60 minutes. Remove from oven, then remove from loaf pan and let cool for 15 minutes.

Beer bread is awesome and very easy to make.

The Dread Cthulhu
10-12-2008, 03:36 PM
I'm studying Food Technology at GCSE.

I really, really wish I wasn't.

demonkoala
10-13-2008, 10:16 AM
Finally made the brownie in a mug the other night...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v178/kaleidoblue/extracc/IMG_8487.jpg?t=1223914389
It was delicious. Not the best of brownies, but for a simple microwave one, it was great. Soft and gooey when it was first heated, but more cakey when it cooled. I'm not much of a baker, so if someone knows more and can spiff it up even more, I'd be impressed.

Sweetwater is a local microbrewery
That makes me a bit sad. I really want to try the bread and drink the beer. I might try something similar with Sam Adams Cherry Wheat or something...

I'm studying Food Technology at GCSE.

I really, really wish I wasn't.
Why not? D:

Egarwaen
10-13-2008, 10:29 AM
Beer bread is awesome and very easy to make.

Seconded. Man, I haven't made it in forever. I totally need to find an excuse to do so.

Paul le Fou
10-13-2008, 01:44 PM
You can find Bar Harbor blueberry ale at most places with a halfway decent selection of beers. It is - and I say this as a huge, huge beer snob - actually pretty tasty. Honestly it's like drinking a blueberry muffin.

ravinoff
10-13-2008, 04:41 PM
That makes me a bit sad. I really want to try the bread and drink the beer. I might try something similar with Sam Adams Cherry Wheat or something...
You can find Bar Harbor blueberry ale at most places with a halfway decent selection of beers. It is - and I say this as a huge, huge beer snob - actually pretty tasty. Honestly it's like drinking a blueberry muffin.

Yeah, the Bar Harbor Blueberry Ale would be a perfectly good substitution. In general I imagine substituting fruit beer of your choice and matching (or even complimentary) dried fruit would be perfectly valid.

Further generalizing beer breads are more commonly (and just as awesome) savory. A good example I like would be my above recipe but reduce the sugar to 2 tbsp at most, use your favorite brown ale for the beer, instead of the dried blueberries mix in diced jalepenos and olives to the batter, and quickly sprinkle cheddar cheese on top of the loaf 15-20 minutes before it's done baking.

Edit: Note for this an all other beer breads: the beer should be room temp, not chilled.

blitzchamp
06-30-2009, 07:24 AM
So for some reason my boiled eggs never come out quite right.

Radical Ans
06-30-2009, 11:01 AM
Seconded. Man, I haven't made it in forever. I totally need to find an excuse to do so.

I think "Someone mentioned it on a forum and now I want it" is an excellent excuse to make beer bread. :)

Radical Ans
06-30-2009, 11:07 AM
Wife has taken to heading to the gym straight after work, leaving me at home to fix dinner. Lately I've been trying out some new recipes to add some variety to our meals. We've been stuck in a rut doing ground turkey and turkey Italian sausage dishes.

The other day I made breaded and sauteed pork chops w/ an arugula and tomato salad on top. The dressing was lemon juice, olive oil, salt and a little vinegar. Over all it was a hit with wife and somewhat on the healthy side (which she insists on since she's on a gym kick).

Last night I made Bacon Chicken (http://busycooks.about.com/od/chickenbreastrecipes/r/baconchicken.htm). I subbed in turkey bacon to take some of the unhealthy stigma off. YUMM!

Sven
06-30-2009, 11:23 AM
So for some reason my boiled eggs never come out quite right.

Are you salting the water? And what altitude are you at?

Lakupo
06-30-2009, 01:53 PM
So for some reason my boiled eggs never come out quite right.

What is going wrong with them?

The popular technique I've seen for the perfect hard-cooked egg boils down to this:
1. Place eggs in a single layer in a pan, and cover with cold water until the water is about an inch above the eggs.
2. Bring the pan to a boil.
3. When it comes to a boil, remove from the heat, cover with a tight lid, and let it stand for about 15 minutes. The time can vary by the size of the eggs and number you're cooking.
4. Drain, cover in cold water, let it sit for a minute, then repeat.
5. You now have hard-cooked eggs!

Torgo
06-30-2009, 02:42 PM
I am in culinary school. Unfortunately, since I rarely cook at home and do not actually work in the food service industry, my skills and knowledge are somewhat... lacking.

I do like baking very, very much though. I make a solid cheesecake and the best pumpkin pie you will ever eat. One thing I would really like to get back into is making ice cream. I had access to an ice cream maker for a little while in '06, and the few batches I made were incredible.

blitzchamp
06-30-2009, 03:09 PM
Are you salting the water? And what altitude are you at?

I don't salt it and I'm not sure what altitude I'm at, probably below sea level since I live in Florida.

What is going wrong with them?

The popular technique I've seen for the perfect hard-cooked egg boils down to this:
1. Place eggs in a single layer in a pan, and cover with cold water until the water is about an inch above the eggs.
2. Bring the pan to a boil.
3. When it comes to a boil, remove from the heat, cover with a tight lid, and let it stand for about 15 minutes. The time can vary by the size of the eggs and number you're cooking.
4. Drain, cover in cold water, let it sit for a minute, then repeat.
5. You now have hard-cooked eggs!

Thanks! I wasn't covering it and letting it stand, it came out much better this time.

Matchstick
06-30-2009, 08:40 PM
... the best pumpkin pie you will ever eat.

The gauntlet has been thrown down. It'll have to be amazing to be better than my mom's. That's not just me, either. A number of folks have said that my mom's pumpkin pie is the best they've ever had. I guess when we get back to HI, we'll have to stop by for a slice.

Torgo
07-27-2009, 09:48 PM
The gauntlet has been thrown down. It'll have to be amazing to be better than my mom's. That's not just me, either. A number of folks have said that my mom's pumpkin pie is the best they've ever had. I guess when we get back to HI, we'll have to stop by for a slice.
I never responded to this, but by all means do! I am always eager for an excuse to prepare food.

Anyway, I prepared a "cake" using the same filling as my pumpkin pie, except in a rectangle cake pan with a graham cracker crust. I'ma gonna top it with some Cool Whip and serve it tomorrow at a potluck. If it goes over well, next time I'll prepare cream cheese frosting instead of using Cool Whip.

That's not what I'm posting here for though. I broke the yolks on two of my eggs when trying to separate the whites, so I had scrambled eggs and toast for dinner. Nothing fancy, just the eggs simply seasoned with some salt and pepper, and man, I always forget how good it is. Everyone (myself included) is always eager to throw every edible ingredient in the kitchen into our eggs. Not that it's not good (or even awesome), but there's a simple elegance and tastiness to straight up eggs. It's a lot cheaper too.

nunix
07-27-2009, 10:00 PM
That's not what I'm posting here for though. I broke the yolks on two of my eggs when trying to separate the whites, so I had scrambled eggs and toast for dinner. Nothing fancy, just the eggs simply seasoned with some salt and pepper, and man, I always forget how good it is. Everyone (myself included) is always eager to throw every edible ingredient in the kitchen into our eggs. Not that it's not good (or even awesome), but there's a simple elegance and tastiness to straight up eggs. It's a lot cheaper too.

Favourite breakfast:

* butter pan
* crack two eggs into pan, add salt + pepper
* fry eggs until exterior is solid but there's still runny yolk inside
* put on plate
* rebutter pan, throw two slices of bread in pan, turn on high, toast bread in pan
* put toast on plate
* put eggs on toast
* .. just.. make a fried egg sandwhich, is what I'm saying
* eat it

You CAN add bacon or tomato or whatever else but generally all that overpowers the egg-and-butter-ness so I leave all that off.

mopinks
07-27-2009, 10:31 PM
god damn I wish I had some eggs

Radical Ans
07-28-2009, 06:23 AM
Favourite breakfast:

* butter pan
* crack two eggs into pan, add salt + pepper
* fry eggs until exterior is solid but there's still runny yolk inside
* put on plate
* rebutter pan, throw two slices of bread in pan, turn on high, toast bread in pan
* put toast on plate
* put eggs on toast
* .. just.. make a fried egg sandwhich, is what I'm saying
* eat it

You CAN add bacon or tomato or whatever else but generally all that overpowers the egg-and-butter-ness so I leave all that off.

On Saturdays I make a similar egg sandwich but I usually scramble and microwave the egg, use a toaster for the toast and add american cheese. If we have some ham I'll add that too.

Dadgum Roi
07-28-2009, 06:54 AM
Since it's summer, most of my cooking has been on the grill/smoker.

Grant's Eastern NC Barbecue recipe:

1) Put pork shoulder in the cooking chamber. Don't put anything on it! Maybe a little salt and pepper. But no other bullshit! No damn rubs. And no smart ass remarks about how I'm using a shoulder! I don't have a cooker that will fit a whole hog, and you cain't haul around a whole pig in a compact car, anyway.

2) Fill side firebox halfway with unlit charcoal. Pour one chimney full of lit charcoal on top of the unlit briquettes. Close everything up.

3) Baste about every hour with vinegar and red pepper sauce. Since you've got the cooker open already, add in some chunks of hickory wood to your fire.

4) Drink beer.

5) Forget about the damn thing for 12 hours or so, then remove from cooker and chop. If you can't pull the bone out, you screwed up.

If you don't want to spend all day waiting, you can do the same thing with chicken and be done in an hour or so.

Dadgum Roi
07-28-2009, 10:44 AM
Also, I tried a brisket recently. It came out...okay. After 6 hours or so in the smoker, it was still pretty tough(this was a 4.5 lb cut). We reheated it in the oven the next day for 3-4 hours, so I guess I need to give it a full day like I do a pork shoulder.

Any sauce recipes? I used a Lexington style barbecue sauce, which is basically an eastern NC vinegar and pepper sauce with ketchup added to it for sweetness. It worked pretty well- the vinegar helps keep the meat moist, and the sauce has a decent sweet/sour/spicy mix.

Posaune
07-28-2009, 10:48 AM
Now I wish I had a grill / smoker.

Radical Ans
07-28-2009, 10:53 AM
I really want to get a smoker. I started using a chimney starter with my grill this summer and it took a lot of the hassle and uncertainty out of grilling with charcoal. Now I want to take it to the next level!!!

I was thinking one of these (http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100661412&categoryID=502391)since it can be used as a grill and smoker:

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/79/7922fac9-1a36-4a2d-b155-d03f744125e6_300.jpg

Dadgum Roi
07-28-2009, 11:00 AM
I was thinking one of these (http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100661412&categoryID=502391)since it can be used as a grill and smoker:


I have that one or a very similar model. It's a great smoker and an okay grill. If you try to grill in the firebox, the grate is a little too close to the coals for many meats, although it's pretty good for steaks .

You can put coals in the main chamber and solve the above problem for things like chicken that take longer to cook, but cleanup is a bit of a pain.

Torgo
07-28-2009, 02:13 PM
Hmm, the pumpkin cake/bars didn't turn out quite as I had hoped. The crust is a little on the soft side, not necessarily a good thing when we're talking about graham cracker. I was a little bothered by how long the thing held its internal temperature after putting it in the fridge, and this is exactly why.

I'm a little nervous about serving it now. It tastes fine, and the pumpkin filling itself is as exemplary as usual, just the crust is a little mushy and not the right texture at all. I think next time I need to let the filling cool down at room temperature a little bit more before pouring it into/onto the crust.

Lucas
07-28-2009, 02:28 PM
Yesterday my brother and I made a big pot of beans in the slow cooker, using a ham hock as the base for flavor and fat. Today, however, we have a bean-covered ham hock and I have no idea what to do with it.

shivam
07-28-2009, 03:13 PM
corn chowder is so hard to figure out how to make taste right.

Dadgum Roi
08-01-2009, 06:23 PM
Second try at brisket today. Fuck, it was good. I brined it overnight in Lexington bbq sauce, then rubbed it this morning with kosher salt, coarse black pepper, and crushed red pepper. Smoked it for about 11 hours. Incredible.

KCar
08-01-2009, 06:29 PM
Grant, what are the odds of you visiting St. John's anytime soon?

I assume they're good. And meaty.

Dadgum Roi
08-01-2009, 06:59 PM
Grant, what are the odds of you visiting St. John's anytime soon?

I assume they're good. And meaty.

It's a thought; a mission program of sorts. Bringing barbecue to our savage neighbors to the north.

Take up the White Man's burden
Send forth the best ye breed
Go bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild
Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half-devil and half-child.

Sven
08-02-2009, 09:28 PM
Did a couple of pork tenderloins today, one with my usual dry rub and another using the one AB used on Good Eats a couple of episodes back. Not sure that I like his version - hell, since mine is basically a slightly bolder version of the rub he used on his ribs, I don't know why he changed it for tenderloin.

Tomorrow: the great garlic roast off, 2009 edition. Twelve bulbs of garlic, one BBQ, some really good olive oil, and one $10 blender from Wal-Mart that only gets pulled out of its triple ziploc bag for this one occasion a year.

(Roasted Garlic joins Shallots on my "easiest way to make your food taste a million times better" list.)

Today, however, we have a bean-covered ham hock and I have no idea what to do with it.

Probably too late, but: shred it, add it to crisped-up hash browns, toss in some onions or shallots, you've got what's surely a good ham hash.

Lucas
08-02-2009, 09:49 PM
A bit late, yeah. Besides, it was one of those hocks that's practically all fat and gristle anyway. As much as I hate throwing away food, I could have gotten maybe a spoonful of actual meat off it.

taidan
08-03-2009, 09:58 AM
I tried very hard to make sure my new Cast Iron Skillet was ready for cooking, and it is working pretty well so far, at least for a cooking novice like me. Cleanup has been damn easy, at least for meats.

Merus
08-03-2009, 10:29 AM
I'm finally accomplished enough at cooking to make sure that Chicken Kiev turns out right. It's hard: you need enough heat to cook it, but not enough that the garlic butter runs out. You can't just blast it and hope that the heat gets to the inside before the coating burns, and you can't simmer it and hope that the low heat is enough to penetrate the meat but not the butter.

But it's one of my favourite meals, so it's good to be able to cook it. My best meal, though, is my hamburgers. I've got them so that they hold together, with a little bit of egg (but not too much, or else they don't hold at all), and lots of lettuce and tomato.

Ample Vigour
08-03-2009, 04:40 PM
Did a couple of pork tenderloins today, one with my usual dry rub and another using the one AB used on Good Eats a couple of episodes back. Not sure that I like his version - hell, since mine is basically a slightly bolder version of the rub he used on his ribs, I don't know why he changed it for tenderloin.

Pork tenderloin's flavor is so subtle compared to pork ribs that it might as well not be there at all. Too much potency in the spice rub, and all you will taste is chili powder and cumin.

Dadgum Roi
08-03-2009, 08:19 PM
Pork tenderloin's flavor is so subtle compared to pork ribs that it might as well not be there at all. Too much potency in the spice rub, and all you will taste is chili powder and cumin.

Pork shoulder/hog quarter/entire hog.

Salt. Pepper. Red Pepper. Vinegar.

Wood.

I keep tellin' you.

Lakupo
08-04-2009, 11:45 PM
Feta turkey burgers with grilled onions and sweet potato fries (dipped in ranch dressing)! ...I should've taken a picture. And hey, it's a good example of cheap eats (although the initial cost for some of the ingredients may have been higher than usual, it was cheap per serving).

Ample Vigour
08-05-2009, 04:19 AM
I keep tellin' you.

Eat your brisket.

demonkoala
08-05-2009, 12:27 PM
Feta turkey burgers with grilled onions and sweet potato fries (dipped in ranch dressing)! ...I should've taken a picture. And hey, it's a good example of cheap eats (although the initial cost for some of the ingredients may have been higher than usual, it was cheap per serving).

I like making my own mediterranean style burgers.
Fry up a large slice of eggplant.
Grill patty.
Make own tsatziki sauce with yogurt, feta, dill, cucumber and onions.
Slice of tomato.
Some nice, slightly crisper bread than I normally take for burgers.

Combine for complete win.

Protip: Sometimes, I fry up my own french fries to eat with excess tsatziki sauce.

blitzchamp
08-06-2009, 07:23 PM
I want to get one of those do it yourself pizza kits that comes with the dough ready to go and stuff. What's the best brand?

Sven
08-06-2009, 07:37 PM
I want to get one of those do it yourself pizza kits that comes with the dough ready to go and stuff. What's the best brand?

Your grocery store will probably sell ready-to-go pizza dough (mine stocks it near the cold meats) - after that, you can use anything you want for the sauce, which gives you an edge over the all-in-one kits. I've gotten to the point where I just use pesto or olive oil as my pizza base (result of having an Italian girlfriend whose mother refused to let her eat North American style pizza, mainly), so I can't comment on the best pizza sauces.

Lucas
08-06-2009, 07:49 PM
My mom and I were pleasantly surprised by the quality of Pillsbury's pizza dough in a can, even if it did take a bit of finessing to fill in the holes when it was stretched out.

SlimJimm
08-07-2009, 07:36 PM
I just saw this place called Cemitas Puebla (http://www.cemitaspuebla.com/index.htm) on Diners Drive ins and Dives and its about 25-30 minutes away from my house. It looked so damn good on tv I definitely need to go there this weekend and try one of these cemitas or tacos arabe.

nunix
08-07-2009, 08:50 PM
I want to get one of those do it yourself pizza kits that comes with the dough ready to go and stuff. What's the best brand?

Thomas English Muffins.

If you can find the sandwich-sized ones, those are best, but I'm pretty sure they stopped making them because they were too popular, or something, I don't know, they were the best and now they are nowhere. >=(

ANYWAY.

English muffins make the best mini pizzas.

You get your pizza sauce, cheese, other toppings, et cetera; make sure everything is pre-cooked. Then you heat your oven up! Then you put the stuff on the split muffins. Then you put them in the oven for about 5 minutes, until they've heated up and the cheese has melted.

Then everyone eats them.

.....

*writes stuff for mini-pizzas on grocery list*

Torgo
08-07-2009, 09:06 PM
english muffin pizzas
Two friends of mine and I did this on the cheap in the microwave back in high school all the time. It was awesome and we never really got tired of it. I had forgotten about it and now I think the concept could use revisiting.

nunix
08-07-2009, 10:37 PM
Two friends of mine and I did this on the cheap in the microwave back in high school all the time. It was awesome and we never really got tired of it. I had forgotten about it and now I think the concept could use revisiting.

Yeah, every now and then I'll forget about them, and only realise it when I haven't eaten them in a year or so, and go, "How the hell do I keep forgetting about mini pizzas?!"

mopinks
08-08-2009, 12:09 AM
stir-frying asapargus is super fast and easy and awesome.

spicy peanut sauce + red pepper olive oil + sriracha + lemon juice = POWER ASPARAGUS

blitzchamp
08-08-2009, 12:14 AM
English muffin pizzas.

Two friends of mine and I did this on the cheap in the microwave back in high school all the time. It was awesome and we never really got tired of it. I had forgotten about it and now I think the concept could use revisiting.

I've never heard of these. It's going on my shopping list for next week.

Lucas
08-08-2009, 12:44 AM
It's been quite a while since I did home-made mini pizzas. They're pretty good on whole wheat!

Torgo
08-08-2009, 12:49 AM
Sauteed steak and onions with mashed purple sweet potatoes.

In a word: Glorious.

Ample Vigour
08-08-2009, 01:07 AM
I have eaten three different meat sandwiches today.

A different meat every time!

SlimJimm
08-08-2009, 09:02 AM
I have eaten three different meat sandwiches today.

A different meat every time!

Truly, a renaissance man.

Gwrrrk
08-09-2009, 09:00 AM
I've been obsessing over making my own soups for the past little while.

Probably my favorite thing to do is make my own turkey stock, and then make soup out of that.

Sven
08-09-2009, 07:43 PM
English muffins make the best mini pizzas.


While good, I still like bagels more for getting my mini-pizzas going, although if you're American you might not get the same results because you\re generally stuck with NY style bagels.

Sheana
08-09-2009, 08:25 PM
NY-style bagels are the best style bagels, what is this craziness. I've been dying for a NY-style bagel since I left the east coast in early '07. :(

Sven
08-09-2009, 08:29 PM
NY-style bagels are the best style bagels, what is this craziness. I've been dying for a NY-style bagel since I left the east coast in early '07. :(

Maybe (although I personally don't agree - Montreal-style are much better when toasted, and that's without tossing in all the whacky flavour combos at GCBC or Tim's), but not the best tools for this particular job.

mopinks
08-09-2009, 10:53 PM
the continuing saga of cooking lots of vegetables: I pan-fried some zucchini!

with tons of garlic, because I wanted to make my girlfriend ill.

demonkoala
08-10-2009, 05:52 AM
Mopinks, I am loving this vegetable phase, because I want to try the POWER asparagus. (I don't think it's possible to say this dish without using caps)

the continuing saga of cooking lots of vegetables: I pan-fried some zucchini!

with tons of garlic, because I wanted to make my girlfriend ill.
Is there really such a thing as so much garlic that can make you ill? If anything, it'll cure.

blitzchamp
08-10-2009, 02:38 PM
Are there instant noodles that don't all taste the same? Every Yakisoba I get tastes too similar.

Sven
08-10-2009, 02:40 PM
Is there really such a thing as so much garlic that can make you ill? If anything, it'll cure.

I know several people - not the least of which is my girlfriend - who can't really eat garlic, especially raw, in any large quantities or else their stomachs start doing backflips.

blitzchamp
08-10-2009, 02:41 PM
I know several people - not the least of which is my girlfriend - who can't really eat garlic, especially raw, in any large quantities or else their stomachs start doing backflips.

Yeah this happened to me once at a spanish restaurant, I ordered garlic mashed potatoes and like garlic mushrooms I think and I was sick for a few hours after that.

Dhroo
08-10-2009, 02:47 PM
Are there instant noodles that don't all taste the same? Every Yakisoba I get tastes too similar.

Have you tried import brands? Some are really good! Hell, I've seen 7-11 stock Bowl Noodle(a particularly good one) recently.

blitzchamp
08-10-2009, 02:57 PM
Have you tried import brands? Some are really good! Hell, I've seen 7-11 stock Bowl Noodle(a particularly good one) recently.

Nope, I should probably head over the local oriental market and see what they have.

Bergasa
08-10-2009, 03:23 PM
This thread just reminded me that the grill is probably done heating up by now. I'm making t-bones! "Love that T-bone!"

Ample Vigour
08-10-2009, 03:50 PM
This thread just reminded me that the grill is probably done heating up by now. I'm making t-bones! "Love that T-bone!"

You grill that shit. You grill it without an ounce of mercy.

Bergasa
08-10-2009, 05:46 PM
You grill that shit. You grill it without an ounce of mercy.

I did! And they were delicious! I also did some chicken for my bro who doesn't eat red meat (I know, right?). They turned out really well too... basically I boiled them for a bit and then threw them on the grill. Near the end I brushed on some grilling sauce, and they were good to go! Chicken is hard to BBQ and make sure it is fully cooked, so I recommend this method to others considering grilling chicken other than simple breasts. Fresh homemade coleslaw and a nice loaf from the store completed the meal.

Sven
08-10-2009, 06:15 PM
I really need to try a couple of the sous vide recipies for chicken from Top Chef. I figure I can get close enough to a constant temperature, and I already have access to a good candy thermometer that Kelly uses when she makes holiday snacks for the Grade 3s....

Balrog
08-10-2009, 07:06 PM
I decided to grill some steaks out(marinated in something called 'steak and chop' and soy sauce) and make some waffle cheese fries with ranch dressing. For dessert I made some cinnamon streusel cupcakes. I'm pretty sure my kids ate their weight in food tonight.

Matchstick
08-10-2009, 08:25 PM
For dessert I made some cinnamon streusel cupcakes.

This is why I love you.

Pajaro Pete
08-10-2009, 09:47 PM
This is why I love you.

Is his wife gonna have to smack a bitch?

Balrog
08-10-2009, 10:02 PM
Ain't no fun if the Matchstick can't have none.

Ruik
08-11-2009, 05:16 PM
The other day I found some bone-in chicken breast on sale for $1 a lb. I'm going to use some of it to make chicken fried rice, which I've gotten pretty good at making, and then use the bones and the rest of the chicken to try my hand at making a soup of some kind. Anyone have tips on how to do this?

Ghost from Spelunker
08-11-2009, 10:30 PM
I think I'm through with tofu.
Everyone always says "it's the pefectly ultimate versatile magical food chameleon!!!" but it never really changes flavor, it just gets some sauce on it and you're tasting the sauce. The tofu itself tastes of diluted scrambled eggs.

Is there any way to at least make tofu thicker? The "extra firm" is half the power of gelatin.

Lakupo
08-11-2009, 11:03 PM
Are you pressing the water out of your tofu before using it? (wrap it in some paper towels or clean kitchen towels if you're really greeeeen, and put it on a plate with something heavy on top of it, maybe another plate and a can of soup or beans; come back in half an hour) You might also consider baked tofu, that you have either baked yourself or bought.

KCar
08-12-2009, 07:53 AM
an hour or two ago, I bit into a plum that was - well, not doing it for me. So I just pan fried it with some left over pork.

That was the right decision. I kind of wish I'd splashed some balsamic on it, but que sera sera.

Pajaro Pete
08-24-2009, 09:28 PM
Tyrants I am in the mood for Mexican food. Tell me your best Mexican food recipes. Tex-mex is acceptable, but please nothing that involves browning ground beef and pouring prepackaged taco seasoning in it.

Edit: On an unrelated note, grilled low country boil? It just might be crazy enough to work!

Mightyblue
08-24-2009, 09:39 PM
I've heard that after you brown the beef for tacos and drain off the excess fat, adding a tablespoon or two of tamari and some finely chopped/minced ginger changes the flavor quite a bit after you let it cook for a few minutes to cook the ginger and tamari into the beef. Apparently it makes quite the contrast to hot or tabasco sauce, but then, the guy I heard it from is one of those people who can eat anything and like it so...

Pajaro Pete
08-24-2009, 09:45 PM
Well I mean if I'm gonna make tacos I'm gonna marinade the meat overnight. Possibly in some sort of lime concoction.

Mightyblue
08-24-2009, 09:53 PM
Well I mean if I'm gonna make tacos I'm gonna marinade the meat overnight. Possibly in some sort of lime concoction.Bah. Spoilsport. :P

Lucas
08-24-2009, 10:07 PM
Tyrants I am in the mood for Mexican food. Tell me your best Mexican food recipes. Tex-mex is acceptable, but please nothing that involves browning ground beef and pouring prepackaged taco seasoning in it.

Edit: On an unrelated note, grilled low country boil? It just might be crazy enough to work!

Question: Do you like to make your own beans? I like to make my own beans.

Pajaro Pete
08-24-2009, 10:13 PM
I don't grow them, if that's what you're saying.
I am capable of soaking them over night and otherwise preparing them in a manner that doesn't require opening a can, if that's what you're saying.

Lucas
08-24-2009, 10:24 PM
Next time you make a pot, I suggest adding some rosemary. People usually say I'm crazy for that, but they don't argue with me after trying it.

Dadgum Roi
08-25-2009, 06:29 AM
Well I mean if I'm gonna make tacos I'm gonna marinade the meat overnight. Possibly in some sort of lime concoction.

Salt, pepper, and a bit of lime juice is about all you need for carne asada. Make sure to buy a thin cut of beef with some fat on it. Diezmillo is great if you have a Mexican butcher near you.

Pajaro Pete
08-27-2009, 03:37 PM
My red beans and rice ended up being closer to gumbo. If only I had thrown some shrimp in there, too.

Calorie Mate
08-27-2009, 03:46 PM
Last night I made that cheap 'n' easy hamburger meat (or fake hamburger meat in this case so Girlfriend could eat it) mixed with cream of mushroom and macaroni that Brickroad posted about eons ago. It's become a family favorite over the last 6 months or so.

Azar
08-27-2009, 04:07 PM
I am making chicken kiev tonight. I predict a taste sensation.

Patrick
08-28-2009, 11:08 AM
My new roommate is going to teach me how to cook! I mean, I can already make a lot of simple meals (especially anything involving cuts of meat, noodles, rice, etc), but I rarely make anything that doesn't come with instructions on the box. I'm excited, because better cooking directly translates into better eating!

Torgo
10-13-2009, 03:33 AM
I really want to get back into my baking. I want to get a KitchenAid stand mixer. Unfortuantely, I'm hearing from a small subset of buyers that the newer ones are of very poor construction and, among other things, leak oil. Yum.

Of course, one can find haters for just about anything on the internet. I don't suppose there's anyone here that's bought one more recently that would be willing to share their thoughts?

Red Hedgehog
10-13-2009, 10:10 AM
I had a dinner date at my apartment where I made Chana Masala last Friday. It came out delicious!

Balrog
10-13-2009, 08:16 PM
When I was a kid I always wanted cinnamon streusel cake for my birthday and my mom always made that but at a certain point they quit making the mix I liked (the one with the icing on top!). So tonight I made myself one of those and added my own vanilla icing to it. OMG SO GOOD EATING THE WHOLE THING RIGHT NOW.

Rosewood
01-14-2010, 01:06 PM
I wasn't sure where to put this....

I'm almost completely new to cooking. I enjoyed baking a lot when I was a kid, and our kitchen had all kinds of mistakes go into the wastecan and some good stuff, too.

But--an undisclosed number of years later--cooking is a foreign language beyond "microwave" and "restaurant."

I really want to step away from the processed garbage I've been eating these last several years, so I'm going to home-cook one dinner a week and step it up from there. My first adventure, planned for this Saturday, is crock-pot tortilla soup and pitas with zucchini-and-yogurt sauce, and maybe some wine to go with them.

P.S. does anyone have a good idea how to gauge salt for soup? Put a wee bit in and taste test and add more if it's too bland, I guess?

shivam
01-14-2010, 01:20 PM
that's exactly it. add salt in stages, cause you can always add more, but you can't take it away.

Lady
01-11-2011, 05:41 PM
I obtained, via various methods (i.e. going to the grocery store) an aubergine this evening.

What should I do with it?

obvious ingredients on hand are rice, tomatoes, mushrooms, onion, garlic, chicken, ground beef

shivam
01-11-2011, 05:43 PM
is it a japanese style or italian style? (ie, long and thin, or football?)

if you had any green/lima beans i'd totally tell you to make indian style baingan.

As it is, grilled eggplant is awesome, and cubed and pan fried is awesome as well.

Lady
01-11-2011, 06:03 PM
like this (http://i.imgur.com/pIfUb.jpg)

I might have a can of green or lima beans. Tell me more!

shivam
01-11-2011, 06:12 PM
i dont know what you have in the way of spices, but here's a good recipe very close to what i personally make =)
http://thespicewholovedme.blogspot.com/2007/05/gujarati-series-chauli-ringan-shaak.html

Lady
01-11-2011, 07:30 PM
well, I wasn't sure what constituted a large eggplant, or how much two bunches of beans were, much less have any of the spices, but I tried it anyway

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5001/5348063854_a58f95a1a4.jpg

I really liked how the garlicky green beans tasted. I don't think the eggplant got soft enough though!

shivam
01-11-2011, 07:32 PM
you really have to cook the shit out of eggplant. it absorbs oil like whoa, but you really really need to leave it alone to make it edible.

Merus
01-11-2011, 07:38 PM
I really want to step away from the processed garbage I've been eating these last several years, so I'm going to home-cook one dinner a week and step it up from there. My first adventure, planned for this Saturday, is crock-pot tortilla soup and pitas with zucchini-and-yogurt sauce, and maybe some wine to go with them.

Adventures are good, but to pull away from processed packet food you'll want to get some easy recipes under your belt that you can just make when you're feeling lazy. Absolutely go for the fancier recipes, they're fun and you'll feel like a kitchen badass, but you don't have to make them every night. Some suggestions:

* Pasta's easy and flexible. It's basically any kind of pasta + pasta sauce, so you can mix it up fairly easily with whatever pasta takes your fancy and graduate from bottles of pasta sauce to homemade. Don't eat pasta too much, though. Late-night carbs. >:(

* Hamburgers! They're so easy a bored teenager can make them, and you can get increasingly fancy as you get increasingly proficient. The best part is that you probably already know what a hamburger is supposed to taste like, so when you make your own you get to appreciate just how much better home cooking is. I usually just get decent quality beef mince, squash it into a patty, and add some mixed herbs. The natural juices hold it together fairly well, although adding 1/4-1/3 of an egg per patty helps hold it together and allow you to add more to the mince, like tomato paste. I'm sure shivam has some tips for a good vegetarian patty.

Lettuce and tomato are givens, with a nice toasted roll (I tend to use Turkish bread because the soak up the sauce and juice fairly well, as well as being nice and big so everything doesn't slide out) and whatever else you want to add; cheese (for best results put next to patty), onion, pickles/gherkins, bacon, egg, beetroot, capsicum/green peppers... hamburgers are flexible like that.

* Meat + greens. A staple diet of the Western family, this involves cooking some meat, cooking some vegetables or making a salad, and then putting both on a plate.

Brer
01-11-2011, 07:42 PM
that's exactly it. add all seasonings in stages, cause you can always add more, but you can't take it away.

Also, if you're concerned about eating better, getting used to not using salt as a go-to seasoning is a good idea. I'm not saying you need to obsess over minimizing your intake. Just don't respond to the thought "mmm, a bit bland" with "add salt", especially in dishes with other flavors you can bring out instead.

shivam
01-11-2011, 07:49 PM
pasta's one of my cheap quick food fixes. but i never use straight bottle sauce, because that's pretty thin and boring and not as healthy as it could be.

So i take half an onion chopped, a couple cloves of garlic, half a zuccini chopped into cubes or half moons, a bell pepper cut into small pieces, and then i cook it all in a pot with some oil and butter.
You start with the onion and garlic (and capers if you have any), and cook till the onion's translucent (toss in a little salt to help them sweat), and then add the zukes and pepper. Cook this down till soft, and add in whatever random spices you're using--chilli flakes, oregano, italian blend, whatever. After this, pour in your bottled sauce till it looks like as much as you want to use to cover your pasta, and simmer for like 5-10 minutes. i guarantee it will make your boring spaghetti or ziti taste way better, and it's healthier too.

Lady
01-11-2011, 07:53 PM
I hate standing over a pan stirring waiting for something slow to cook >:[ can you microwave eggplant like you could a potato to get it to soften? Assume my palate isn't cultivated enough to tell the difference 8)

since I only used half, tomorrow is probably going to be an experiment in baking it somehow, along with a sweet potato, that I have (of all things) smoothie plans for.


I usually add onion, garlic and mushrooms to my spaghetti, but usually I just cook them in with the meat.

shivam
01-11-2011, 07:57 PM
dude, just leave the eggplant alone. fry it in the pan to start, then put in some water, cover the pan, and walk away.
it will steam and be fine.

Lady
01-11-2011, 08:28 PM
the green beans were sticking to the bottom of my pan and I'm allergic to washing dishes :(

shivam
01-11-2011, 08:29 PM
cook the eggplant first, and then add the beans. add water in there, and everything will steam together and be fine.

Hito
01-11-2011, 10:38 PM
Lady, another way to make eggplant tolerable for your impatient cooking needs is to prepare it overnight. Slice it how you want, liberally apply salt, then allow it to sit in a container with holes overnight. Rinse well and pat dry before using it in the final preparation. It'll cook much faster.

Pombar
02-14-2011, 01:16 AM
I too am (hopeless, if not entirely) new to this cooking gig. A few weeks back #talkingtime walked me through boiling eggs. Livecooking is one technological advancement I can get behind.
However, that was a meal based on me having only eggs and all stores being closed. I now have, equipment-wise:
Frying Pan, Pan of the size I'd boil pasta in, 2 Hobs to put these on, one mini-oven.
Food-wise I still have a silly amount of eggs, and am heading off to buy some bacon today, but in an effort to eat cheaper these next few months, I want to start eating almost entirely from home. What should I be buying that can be found at a Chinese supermarket*, and can be cooked without too much expertise?

I realise rice is so cheap as to be almost free, and rice cookers are cheap, but I firstly don't know how to use the rice cooker a flatmate has here already, secondly don't know if I'm allowed to use it 'till she gets back, and thirdly am not a gigantic fan of rice unless there's a good amount of curry/sauce to go with it.

*I may take pictures to show a flavour of what's on offer, but essentially, no bread, no cheese, no good yoghurt, no sausages, and the meat is weird and often pre-sweetened. Oh, and pasta's super expensive.

nunix
02-14-2011, 10:15 AM
Be careful of the rice you buy (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/08/report-china-fake-rice-plastic/). Actually, this goes for most food in China, but you're already there and there's no sense sending you into a food panic, so just shop smart. Stay away from farm-raised fish and seafood, talk with locals to find out what vegetables are generally safest to eat or where you should shop from, and you should be good.

That said, rice really is your best bet for a cheap staple, there's a lot you can do with it, and rice cookers are dead-easy. They are all essentially one-button to press when cooking white rice, takes <an hour, and will keep it warm and tasty for 5-6 hours easy. When does your flatmate get back? If for some reason you can't use it, you should buy one. A small 3 cup* cooker should run you not much money at all.

Any vegetables are probably good. Beans, bok choy, carrots... I don't know what grows in China and what's imported.

Fresh catch low-on-the-food-chain fish are good: sardines, anchovies, jellyfish, squid. If you see it, Atlantic herring and Alaskan/Pacific halibut are also good choices.


* an Asian rice cup is 180 ml and a standardised size. always useful to remember.

Reinforcements
02-14-2011, 10:37 AM
I realise rice is so cheap as to be almost free, and rice cookers are cheap, but I firstly don't know how to use the rice cooker a flatmate has here already, secondly don't know if I'm allowed to use it 'till she gets back, and thirdly am not a gigantic fan of rice unless there's a good amount of curry/sauce to go with it.
A rice cooker is nice to have if you want to have rice ready ALL THE TIME. Which some do! As I'm sure you're aware, being in China and all. That said, if you're going to be eating rice less often than every day you don't remotely need a rice cooker. Rice is as easy (or easier) to cook than pasta. Get brown rice if you can though; it takes longer to cook but is much more nutritious.