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Tomm Guycot
10-12-2008, 10:46 PM
So guys, I tried to get back on my track of listening to the Beatles' catalog about two months ago with the White Album.

Got through it once and I've kind of been afraid to give it a second listen. That is one strange-ass album. I mean I like "...USSR" but beyond that, I don't know. The second disc especially is some of the most unnerving 'music' I've ever heard.

Do I keep struggling with this? Is it worth liking? Or do I forge ahead with Submarine?

Sheana
10-12-2008, 11:02 PM
White Album is definitely pretty different from the others, I'd say. You owe it to yourself to make it all the way through to Abbey Road and such.

JDS
10-12-2008, 11:10 PM
The album's pretty unbalanced and lacks a certain flow. I can't believe they put "Julia" and "Blackbird" on the same side, for instance. The second disc is overloaded with their stylistic exercises and novelty songs. Still, can't you dig the chord changes on "Sexy Sadie"? The slowed-down version of "Revolution"? The drugged out weariness of "Long, Long, Long"?

Levi VsRobot
10-12-2008, 11:15 PM
Dizzy Rascal > Beatles.

Sanagi
10-12-2008, 11:19 PM
I never really listen to it as an album any more, just the songs themselves in my various playlists... I think Piggies is my favorite because it's very fun to sing along with. What they need's a damn good whacking!

As an album I'd say Abbey Road is vastly better.

Tomm Guycot
10-12-2008, 11:25 PM
Dizzy Rascal > Beatles.

You've missed the point of this thread.

demonkoala
10-12-2008, 11:51 PM
Not one of my favorite albums, and in fact, it has some of my least favorite Beatles songs. It's really the lack of flow. It's really difficult to sit down and listen through it. Funny enough, I did it just the other day when cleaning my room/house...

Sheana
10-12-2008, 11:55 PM
The White Album has a special place in my heart, as it was the very first CD I was ever given, as a birthday present in my preteens. You say it's your birthday!

Animate Nihilist
10-13-2008, 12:28 AM
Everything The Beatles has ever done is worth giving a chance. Be wary of solo albums. I like Mccartney and Harrison better than Lennon. There, I said it.

Tomm Guycot
10-13-2008, 12:31 AM
Since apparently none of you were around when I started this (except Sheana):

I am listening to all the Beatles albums. I'm not asking which ones to hear or for encouragement to get through them. This is me "getting into them."

So it seems we agree the White Album is crap and I can move along.

Azar
10-13-2008, 12:44 AM
While it doesn't have the incredible continuity of awesome songs like Sgt. Pepper's, I think The White Album has the largest collection of Beatles songs I really love.

Back in the USSR
Ob-la-di Ob-la-da
While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Happiness is a warm gun
Blackbird
Rocky Raccoon
Julia
Everybody's got something to hide except for me and my monkey
Helter Skelter

They're all just fantastic songs. I dunno, I don't see how you can like The Beatles without being all over the White Album.

Tomm Guycot
10-13-2008, 12:49 AM
They're all just fantastic songs. I dunno, I don't see how you can like The Beatles without being all over the White Album.

Revolver

see also: Rubber Soul

Merus
10-13-2008, 01:22 AM
Wait, Helter Skelter's on the White Album?

That explains so much about Charles Manson.

demonkoala
10-13-2008, 01:22 AM
So it seems we agree the White Album is crap and I can move along.

I wouldn't say it's crap. Just, sitting through it is hard. My suggestion, take it in pieces. It is a really long album...

demonkoala
10-13-2008, 01:26 AM
Hell, while we're at it, I'll post some songs from it that I especially like (not mentioned by Azar)

Dear Prudence
Glass Onion
Martha my dear
I'm so tired
Don't pass me by
I will
Yer Blues

That makes 16 songs total....half the album :D

Sheana
10-13-2008, 01:54 AM
What Azar and Koala said. While greatly flawed with a lot of songs I don't listen to and mostly ignore, it's also got a helluva lot of songs that I love and that're near the top for me. I still know all the words to Rocky Raccoon by heart.

Also, really, why don't we do it in the road?

Matchstick
10-13-2008, 02:07 AM
I was here for the first go 'round of this as well. I concur that the White Album is a thorny one, but I wouldn't say it's crap. There's a lot of good music (as people have highlighted already), but it's mixed in with a bunch of stuff that is much less interesting to most people. I'd consider it essential if for no other reason than that it contains "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", which is one of my favorite songs ever. "Dear Prudence", "Blackbird" and others are also great. Check out Prince ripping the song apart (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7sT1HRV2qU) at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction for George Harrison.

Dhroo
10-13-2008, 02:19 AM
White Album is really great for road trips, I've found. And personally, I think it's best when listened to from start to finish. There are admittedly a few songs where I feel like I'm "sitting through" them, but only a few.

At any rate, you should definitely give this album another chance. I didn't care much for it at first myself, but it really grew on me after I had listened to it a few times.

Sheana
10-13-2008, 02:36 AM
Also, fun fact: Helter Skelter was Paul McCartney wanting the band to rock out like The Who. It kiiiinda backfired. Though: I've got blisters on my fingers!

mopinks
10-13-2008, 02:48 AM
So it seems we agree the White Album is crap and I can move along.

NO, YOU ARE CRAP

Azar
10-13-2008, 02:50 AM
Also, really, why don't we do it in the road?
No one will be watching us!

Pooch
10-13-2008, 05:08 AM
Wait, Helter Skelter's on the White Album?

That explains so much about Charles Manson.

Manson got a "message" out of "Piggies," too.

Anyway, I like the White Album a lot, but very often I'll stop after Side 3 (er, "Long Long Long"). Listening to the CD (without side breaks) has gotten me to the point where I can almost groove to "Revolution 9," though, so I'm not the best source for an objective viewpoint on the album.

I'd definitely take Rubber Soul, Revolver and Abbey Road over the White Album, though.

And Tomm, George Harrison held a view of the album similar to yours: he once said he could pretty much only listen to the first side of the album (up through "Happiness is a Warm Gun") and didn't care for the rest. Likewise, George Martin has always been of the viewpoint that the Beatles should have taken the best 14 or 15 songs and made a really good single album (and spared us such tracks as "Wild Honey Pie" in the process).

Edit because I didn't really address Tomm's original question: The White Album is definitely worth trying to get into. The good songs, to me, outweigh the bad (especially if you gloss over the final quarter of the album). But I can see how a lot of the second CD could turn one off.

What version of Yellow Submarine do you have, by the way? Either way you get the same 4 "new" songs (which were all a year or two old when initially released), but the Songtrack version at least has other Beatle songs (though I don't care for the remixing that was done), while the original album is barely worth listening to because of the rather boring incidental music from the film that makes up Side 2.

liquid
10-13-2008, 05:13 AM
The White Album is my favorite Beatles album.

I'd try listening to it a few more times to see if it grows on you. The flow is a bit odd, and you may never like Revolution 9, but the first three sides are amazing.

mr_bungle700
10-13-2008, 05:49 AM
Same whatnot about the album being imperfect but including some great, great songs etc. There's at least one classic album worth of material there.

Paul le Fou
10-13-2008, 08:16 AM
I really like the White Album. In fact, at one point I remember marking it as my favorite Beatles album. I can see how it'd be odd to listen to "as an album" but luckily that's never really been my style of listening to music. It has so many good songs that it makes it all worth it. USSR, Rocky Raccoon, Happiness is a Warm Gun, Birthday, Helter Skelter, O-bla-di O-bla-da, While My Guitar Gently Weeps, Blackbird, Julia, Revolution (the actual song one)... I even like the other, "weird" songs. I dunno, it's just always jived with me.

Animate Nihilist
10-13-2008, 09:59 AM
I've always liked the white album, as long I'm allowed to skip Revolution 9. This might be a bit off topic, but I strongly recommend Danger Mouse's The Grey Album, which is a mashup of the white album and Jay-Z's The Black Album.

RAC
10-13-2008, 10:14 AM
I've always liked the white album, as long I'm allowed to skip Revolution 9.

Seconded. When Tomm described the second disc as "unnerving," this is the track that sprang to mind. Helter Skelter and Long, Long, Long have their own weirdnesses, but Revolution 9 is one that I genuinely cannot listen to, particularly through headphones.

taidan
10-13-2008, 10:44 AM
I love The White Album.

Weird, yes, but once I start playing it - at any point - I can't stop.

There's so many awesome elements to it. The way Back in the USSR seques perfectly into Dear Prudence, which is easily one of my favorite tracks the band has ever done. You've got Happiness is a Warm Gun, Blackbird, Piggies, I even love I'm so Tired. The second half of the album is definitely wacky, and I don't listen to it as much, but oh well. As a mind dump of sorts of the band at that period, it has so many gems.

Sheana
10-13-2008, 04:14 PM
'Dear Prudence' becomes a much sweeter song, too, when you consider that it started life as something John Lennon sang under the window of a girl who'd had a panic attack and wouldn't leave her room, trying to coax her out.

Red Hedgehog
10-13-2008, 04:26 PM
White Album, as an album, isn't so great. The flow isn't very good and really only sometimes works.

In terms of songs, it's pretty awesome. Half the album is great, and 3/4 is good.

JCDenton
10-13-2008, 06:05 PM
Easily my favorite Beatles album. On my first listen, nothing really stuck out, but after leaving the first disc in my CD player for a couple of weeks, I really took a shining to it. The process of wtf, meh to amazing then repeated with the second disc.

It is so beautifully disjointed I can't help but love it, not only as individual songs but as an album. The only song I don't care for is Julia and even that is growing on me since I watched Cowboy Bebop. No song sounds like any other and while that may screw with the consistency, it is an incredible snapshot into the band as it drifted apart. So many styles, themes and ideas are represented. It might be a mess, but it's a beautiful mess.

Revolution 9 is great.

Sheana
10-13-2008, 06:14 PM
It's also got a song about a dog on it. People like dogs, right?

locit
10-13-2008, 08:25 PM
It's also got a song about a dog on it. People like dogs, right?
Martha My Dear (Paul's sheepdog was named Martha) is really a frustrating song! It starts out strong enough and gets really great when horns come in at "take a good look," but never delivers on a second round of awesome. It's a shame, but this sort of thing is why we have the Electric Light Orchestra.

I love the White Album, even if I find myself skipping through some tracks depending on my mood. Favourites include:

U.S.S.R. (if we ever get another band as big as the Beatles, and we won't, I expect them to do something like this for China)
Martha My Dear
Glass Onion
While My Guitar Gently Weeps
Happiness is a Warm Gun
Martha My Dear
I'm So Tired
Blackbird
Rocky Raccoon (when the mood strikes me)
I Will
Yer Blues
Mother Nature's Son
Everybody's Got Something to Hide...
Sexy Sadie
Helter Skelter (unbelievably fun at karaoke)
Revolution 1
Cry Baby Cry

So, yeah, most of the album. The White Album is basically everybody going for the spotlight, and no one willing to compromise. You get a double dose of Beatles, even if some stuff that might not have made it into a more tightly produced album shows up. I mean, Ringo has a song!

At this point George had a decent backlog of quality songs, and he was understandably put out that Lennon-McCartney still held dominance over the tracklist. This eventually came back to bite the duo in the ass when Harrison's debut album, All Things Must Pass, blew their own solo efforts out of the water with its sheer volume of excellent, fully developed songs.

McCartney and Lennon were busy trying to outdo one another at their own game. Paul got simple and rough (Why Don't We Do It In The Road, Helter Skelter) and John got sappy and soft (Julia, Goodnight). The White Album is basically a bunch of solo efforts crammed onto two LPs, but said efforts are generally pretty awesome.

Sheana
10-13-2008, 09:30 PM
Hah, I never really put much thought into Martha My Dear. It's always just been a cute song about a guy singing to his dog with a perky piano tune in it.

People sing Helter Skelter at karaoke? I guess between that and the Across The Universe movie and whatnot, it's finally starting to lose its stigma.

Dhroo
10-13-2008, 10:14 PM
I haven't seen much love for Honey Pie yet! I should do something about that:

Honey Pie is great and I love it.

There we go!

Tomm Guycot
10-13-2008, 10:27 PM
Gave it another listen today promising I wouldn't force myself through any song that got dreadful. (Surprisingly I got midway through Revolution 9!) Judging it as "a bunch of songs showing the band drifting apart" helped me through. Here are the songs I dub good:

Back in the USSR
Dear Prudence
Glass Onion
Wild Honey Pie (EarthBound fan, remember?)
While my Guitar Gently Weeps
Happiness is a Warm Gun
Blackbird
Why Don't we Do it in the Road?
I Will
Birthday (begrudgingly... it's just too hooky)
Everybody's got Something to Hide except Me and My Monkey (same reason)
Helter Skelter
Revolution 1 (maybe. goes on pretty long)

I guess what frustrates me is if they focused just on the good stuff and cut the rest they'd have their best album ever potentially. Seriously, try and argue this isn't the best Beatles album ever:

Back in the USSR / Dear Prudence / Revolution 1 / Wild Honey Pie / Glass Onion / ...Monkey / Why Don't we Do it in the Road? / While my Guitar Gently Weeps / Blackbird / Birthday / Helter Skelter / I Will / Happiness is a Warm Gun

Best song on the album: depending on your taste, it's a tie between USSR/Warm Gun or Helter Skelter

EDIT: i don't recommend "Why Don't We Do It in the Road?" if you spent all of yesterday reading The Road like I did.

Pooch
10-14-2008, 05:55 AM
Something else to consider is the fact that there were a bunch of other, better, songs written by the Beatles during this period that didn't make the album. If the album was released today, it would most definitely have "Hey Jude" on it - and maybe even the harsher rock version of "Revolution," which is light years better than "Revolution 1". Other tracks written for the album include "Mean Mr. Mustard," "Polythene Pam" (both later recorded for Abbey Road), Paul's "Junk" (from McCartney), John's "Child of Nature" (which later appeared on Imagine, re-written as "Jealous Guy"), and George's "Not Guilty" (not released until 1979 on his George Harrison LP). I also think John's "Look at Me" (from Plastic Ono Band) and George's "All Things Must Pass" (All Things Must Pass LP) and "Something" (Abbey Road) originate from around that time, as well. Any of those songs probably could have knocked the weaker tracks off and made an already great album even better.

Also, I'll stand up for both "I'm So Tired" and "Yer Blues," two of my favorites off the album. John Lennon liked to point out that both songs - rife with depression and suicidal tendencies - were written during what was supposed to be an idyllic meditation retreat with the Maharishi. And throw "Savoy Truffle" in there as another favorite, too. I like the funky horns on that one.

Lastly, I think Paul has said in interviews that "Martha My Dear" isn't actually about his sheepdog. Wikipedia suggests it might be about Jane Asher, whose engagement to Paul ended right around that time.

JDS
10-14-2008, 07:18 AM
Don't forget "What's the New Mary Jane", a song so atypical of John Lennon that for years people thought it was Syd Barrett outtake.

locit
10-14-2008, 07:34 AM
Lastly, I think Paul has said in interviews that "Martha My Dear" isn't actually about his sheepdog. Wikipedia suggests it might be about Jane Asher, whose engagement to Paul ended right around that time.
I don't think it's about his dog, it's just the only song I could think of with any sort of connection to one.

From what I remember, "What's the New Mary Jane" is waaaaaaay more irksome that Revolution 9 ever gets. I've only listened to it once or twice, though.

Pooch
10-14-2008, 12:37 PM
Ah yes, I did forget "What's the New Mary Jane." In my defense, though, I think that song is terrible. I'm amused that John Lennon thought so much of it he went so far as to try and get it issued as a Plastic Ono Band single in 1969 (even though it was copyrighted as a Beatles song).

Anyway, although the next albums released after the White Album were Yellow Submarine and Abbey Road, the next to be (mostly) recorded was Get Back/Let It Be. As such, I figured I'd share one of the final shining moments in the Beatles' career, their rooftop concert:

Part 1 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ea6ZcfJspcI)
Part 2 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xINfAYiWVhU)
Part 3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pd8JYA4MvlQ)

The segment takes up the final 20 or so minutes of the film Let It Be (someone on YouTube has actually uploaded the film in its entirety, but a lot of it isn't super interesting unless you're a hardcore fan). The actual performance itself was about 40 minutes, but that's because the band played several songs multiple times ("Get Back" was played three times, and both "Don't Let Me Down" and "I've Got a Feeling" were played twice each). I love the bystanders' reactions to the concert.

Some more performances from Let It Be:

You Really Got a Hold on Me (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ifTCGxU8wM) - The Beatles had already covered this on With the Beatles, but George revived it here because he loved Smokey Robinson.
Besame Mucho (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFFCkHZ70gw) - Another old song the Beatles would perform in their pre-fame days. Paul sings in a mock-operatic voice.
Octopus's Garden (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV9BnBw7LBU) - Ringo showing the song to George, which transforms into a rough performance of the song featuring Ringo on piano, George on guitar, and John on drums.

Really, though, the Get Back sessions were fairly crappy in retrospect. Some very good songs came out of it, but clearly Paul was the only one really into things. Well, Billy Preston too, but he wasn't a Beatle (though without Billy Preston, it's very likely the record would never have been made at all).

----

Not related to Let It Be at all, but I've always had a certain interest in songs the Beatles wrote for others, yet never recorded themselves. In the early days John and Paul wrote hits for pretty much every act managed by Brian Epstein (until 1965 or so), and once Apple Records formed suddenly George and Paul began offering songs to their artists. It may not be of interest to anyone else, but here are some songs from John, Paul and George that were initially recorded by others:

Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas "Bad to Me & I Call Your Name" (1963) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJfWNmVR4pY) - Both written by John. The Beatles later did a version of "I Call Your Name" (featuring a sorta ska beat in the middle), released on the Long Tall Sally EP in 1964.
The Rolling Stones "I Wanna Be Your Man" (1963) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nOQCRVCm_A) - Yep, the Stones' second single (and first UK Top 20 hit) was written by John and Paul. The Beatles' version was recorded concurrently and was released a couple of weeks later on With the Beatles.
Peter and Gordon "A World Without Love" (1964) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sl34ba_Y8lo) - Written by Paul. Peter - the redhead - is the brother of Jane Asher, Paul's girlfriend at the time. Later, Peter discovered James Taylor and produced his early records.
Cilla Black "Step Inside Love" (1968) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHVLwHJNC-0) - Written by Paul for Cilla's TV show. There's an off-the cuff performance of the track by John, Paul and Ringo available on Anthology 3.
Jackie Lomax "Sour Milk Sea" (1968) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=goAysx5Zwp8) - Written and produced by George, and features Paul, George, Ringo, and Eric Clapton, I believe.
Mary Hopkin "Goodbye" (1968) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3iDFmHT6_o) - Written and produced by Paul. This was the follow-up single to Mary's hugely successful "Those Were the Days" (which was one of only two non-Beatle gold records for Apple Records).
Badfinger "Come and Get It" (1969) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPHGVO1DsPM&fmt=18) - Written and produced by Paul. First hit record for Badfinger, who had just changed their name from The Iveys. Featured in the Peter Sellers/Ringo Starr film The Magic Christian.

Along those lines, I found on YouTube the UK TV special "The Music of Lennon & McCartney," which aired in late 1965. Hosted by John and Paul, the focus is on the various artists who'd covered John and Paul's songs (including several of the acts I linked above), and the Beatles also appear miming to their then-new single "Day Tripper" and "We Can Work It Out." - Part 1 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EC3vmzf8KwA) / 2 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikLE1rFpd10) / 3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFOZYAerlno) / 4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwqpP8101jM) / 5 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdcrohQH8OY) / 6 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWWpZFVqIos) / 7 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sln8OkarycE)

mr_bungle700
10-14-2008, 01:19 PM
Well, Billy Preston too, but he wasn't a Beatle.

He was close enough, though! Also, he was (and still is!) awesome.

locit
10-14-2008, 02:51 PM
Octopus's Garden (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oV9BnBw7LBU) - Ringo showing the song to George, which transforms into a rough performance of the song featuring Ringo on piano, George on guitar, and John on drums.
I love how they're all actually getting into it until Paul shows up.

Sheana
10-14-2008, 03:19 PM
I'm So Tired is a definite favorite of mine. And only partially because of a high school project back in the day where some kids did a videotaped performance of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, where they set the killing scene to that song.

The movie Let It Be is both depressing and fantastic at the same time. The depression and fraying nerves are palpable, along with everybody's building resentment towards Paul. Very telling how they all have fun with Ringo's song until Mucca shows up.

The rooftop concert is brilliant. You know U2 wishes they'd thought of it first. I love the fact that they're just randomly playing on a rooftop in the middle of the day, and all the people slowly gather around them on all sides, climbing ladders and filling every possible nook and cranny. The buildup of Get Back starting and all the astonished people stopping and looking up is great.

Not to mention all the old people being horrified!

Knight
10-14-2008, 03:28 PM
Dear Prudence is my favorite from the White Album. I also really like the cover version of it (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4a8vMZGaFg) done by The Five Stairsteps. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wshtwWs4Nrk)

Sheana
10-14-2008, 03:57 PM
I amend my previous post: the best part of the Rooftop Concert is clearly the old man with the bowler hat, suit coat and large calabash climbing up a ladder to a rooftop to quietly view the proceedings.

JDS
10-14-2008, 04:10 PM
Dear Prudence is my favorite from the White Album. I also really like the cover version of it (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4a8vMZGaFg) done by The Five Stairsteps. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wshtwWs4Nrk)

Siouxsie and the Banshees' version is pretty tight as well. It's from the five minutes Robert Smith was in the band.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRZYeHGEwRo

demonkoala
10-14-2008, 04:20 PM
I must say, because of this thread, I've had "Tell me what you see" eternally stuck in my head.

Sanagi
10-15-2008, 01:59 AM
I haven't seen much love for Honey Pie yet! I should do something about that:

Honey Pie is great and I love it.

There we go!
Honey Pie is just on the right side of too cute.

Wild Honey Pie is pretty entertaining too, I think.

Revolution #9 kind of needs to be on the album to complete it even though it's not that fun to listen to.

alexb
10-16-2008, 09:19 AM
This (http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/10/14/ringo.starr.fan.mail/index.html) seems kind of appropriate here. Apparently Ringo Starr no longer wants to have to interact with his fans. According to this story on CNN, after October 20th, he'll no longer respond to any fan mail sent to him. Seems like a pretty assholish way of behaving considering how much he owes to his fans.

Tomm Guycot
10-16-2008, 11:48 AM
This seems like a completely different Ringo than the one I know from The Simpsons.

Jeanie
10-16-2008, 12:37 PM
I was thinking of that episode too.

Balrog
10-16-2008, 12:50 PM
You won't see me

You won't see me

Tomm Guycot
10-16-2008, 12:54 PM
This (http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/10/14/ringo.starr.fan.mail/index.html) seems kind of appropriate here. Apparently Ringo Starr no longer wants to have to interact with his fans. According to this story on CNN, after October 20th, he'll no longer respond to any fan mail sent to him. Seems like a pretty assholish way of behaving considering how much he owes to his fans.

I think the man has a right. It's his life, you don't own any of it.

Sheana
10-16-2008, 01:23 PM
As one of the most famous musicians on earth for the last forty-plus years, I can't blame the man for wanting a bit of quiet time and life to himself. He's put in plenty of time as one of the nice guys of rock. He's creeping up on 70, I mean c'mon.

For some reason I just though of a clip I recently saw in a documentary about Dylan. It's the '60s and the height of his early fame, and as he's walking along some fan grabs at his 'fro. He just kind of sadly mumbles "Man I don't do that to you".

locit
10-16-2008, 01:45 PM
I must say, because of this thread, I've had "Tell me what you see" eternally stuck in my head.
Seriously, it's been going nonstop for a few days now.

If Ringo's actually been responding to all his fan mail from the past few decades I can't blame him for being burnt out- his quotes in the article make it sound like people have been sending him stuff just to get his signature. Plus there's still four days left to send fan mail before he stops responding!

Sheana
10-16-2008, 01:52 PM
I have to say, the thought of sitting at a typewriter or computer or whatever for twenty years just to answer every single thing a fan sends sounds kind of depressing to me. After spending the prime of my life running around non-stop appeasing said fans, I'd like a little me-time, y'know?

Plus, this is the band where wonked-out fans murdered one member and almost managed to murder a second, so I'm amazed Ringo didn't stop sooner.

(I can't help but play devil's advocate. Especially since I have a cat named Ringo Starcat.)

Pooch
10-16-2008, 01:54 PM
I think a bigger stink is possibly being made because it's Ringo, the "nice" one. Paul's been in his ivory tower for years, so no one would be surprised if he said he never read his fan mail (though he's painfully acute of his public standing, and thus would never say such a thing). John's been dead for 30 years, but even before that he was fairly reclusive after 1975 (really, 1974). And George could be quite prickly when he wanted to be as well. But Ringo has always had the friendly image - and is always so warm and engaging in his interviews - so people are having a hard time fathoming the situation.

Goodness, "Love Me Do" was released 46 years ago this month, and Ringo was a big star in Liverpool (and Hamburg) for a few years before that, so he's been hounded by fans for nearly 50 years. I can't even begin to imagine what that would be like. And like Sheana said, he's nearly 70 (though it doesn't seem like it), so he's gotta slow down sometime.

JDS
10-16-2008, 02:14 PM
Big star? I've never gotten the impression that Rory and the Hurricanes were anything greater than a hot live band.

Sheana
10-16-2008, 02:24 PM
Well, like the man said, he was a star in Liverpool. A local star.

Memorabilia markets and profiteers can be an issue. I know Roger Daltrey is loathe to give out any autographs or anything because he kept seeing most of it wind up on eBay.

Man, Ringo's approaching 70. It's kind of hard to fathom one of the Beatles turning 70. And not just because half of them are dead. :(

Tomm Guycot
10-16-2008, 03:20 PM
It sure was nice of Ringo to give my thread new life.

I should send him a thank you letter

...oh wait

locit
10-16-2008, 06:13 PM
Man, Ringo's approaching 70. It's kind of hard to fathom one of the Beatles turning 70. And not just because half of them are dead. :(
Ringo will outlive Paul, and probably stick around for another 30 years. I feel comfortable making this assertion because he is the luckiest man alive.

Jeanie
10-16-2008, 06:23 PM
Maybe, but Paul's a huge asshole and huge assholes live forever.

Sheana
10-16-2008, 09:16 PM
I dunno, my money's on Ringo. There's a universal joke somewhere about the oldest of a bunch outliving the rest (see: my family's dogs), and Ringo's looked more or less the same since childhood, so he's probably got the eternity thing down pat.

jcole459
10-17-2008, 02:29 AM
Dear Prudence is my favorite from the White Album. I also really like the cover version of it (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4a8vMZGaFg) done by The Five Stairsteps. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wshtwWs4Nrk)

Nice, I had no idea they'd done a cover - sounds like a good one too. As for the Beatles' recording of it, I have to say I wholeheartedly agree with the recent post (from a different thread) that said the Beatles' studio recording of Dear Prudence is itself perfect in every way. Nothing really could have been put in or taken out of that song to make it better. Ten years ago when I first heard it I liked it; it's grown to become quite possibly my favorite Beatles song of all time in that time span.

And okay, I'm sure I'm in the minority here, but for some reason I like Revolution 1 better than the harder-rocking, classic-rock-radio-staple version of it. I don't know exactly why this is, because the laid-back tone of the former totally doesn't match the lyrics. Something that does bug me about the harder one is the vocal overdubbing error that makes Lennon's line, "You tell me that it's evolution" sound like "You tell me that it's evol-TUTION" - that totally jumps out at me every time. I still like it, just not as much as the White Album's version.

Lombaszko
10-17-2008, 05:41 AM
Here is a must download for fans of the album.
http://bp1.blogger.com/_ff5MJzk-sRY/R8dMtW9rEOI/AAAAAAAAANY/ecP7XRVB7t8/s200/esherdemos.jpg
Demos of white album songs recorded in George's house.
More info here. (http://bloggerhythms.blogspot.com/2008/03/beatles-acoustic-masterpieces-esher.html)

Sheana
10-17-2008, 03:38 PM
My social studies teacher in middle school played the softer version of Revolution in class once!

So, uh, Tomm and other people who just recently started buying all the Beatles albums, bad timing: the '87 remasters done for CD are generally considered very bad, and I heard that they're looking to do a careful new remaster of the music to rerelease on disc in 2009. So you get to buy it all over again next year!

taidan
10-17-2008, 03:46 PM
My social studies teacher in middle school played the softer version of Revolution in class once!

So, uh, Tomm and other people who just recently started buying all the Beatles albums, bad timing: the '87 remasters done for CD are generally considered very bad, and I heard that they're looking to do a careful new remaster of the music to rerelease on disc in 2009. So you get to buy it all over again next year!

This is me too :( I only need their first four to complete the set.

Tomm Guycot
10-19-2008, 01:28 PM
Yellow Submarine

So I should go into some explanation here. I bought Yellow Submarine the version with instrumentals from the film because my idea behind this "study" was to listen to the albums people heard when they were released. For this reason I will also be getting Let It Be Clothed. Luckily we have those crazy "screw you Tomm!" remasters coming out next year, so I'll buy the "good" versions of the albums then.

Yellow Submarine - We've covered this twice already. It was annoying and repetitive on 1, it sure as hell isn't enthralling or fresh now.

Only a Northern Song - Kind of generically "this era Beatles." It does kind of set a precedent here that it sounds more Sgt.Pepper/MMT than white album. Not clear why this album acts like White Album never happened. Enlightenment please?

All Together Now - I like this song "okay." It's fun and light.

Hey Bulldog - Probably my favorite Beatles song on the album, despite the proto-Chili Peppers vibe to some of the verses. I really like the rawness to the "you can talk to me" sections.

It's All Too Much - Another passable song. The repeating percussion throughout, if you squint, sounds like Megaman. This makes it an entirely different song.

All You Need is Love - In contrast to Yellow Submarine, this was one of my favorite songs on 1 and nothing's changed. Still one of the Beatles' best. I don't know why but the fading "She loves you yeah yeah yeah" at the end is what gets me.

Instrumental Crap - Now all you people said to avoid this, but it's actually really good. I probably like this half of the album more than the first half (or would, without "...Love" on it). It's pleasant and enjoyable, and I've never even seen the film. If nothing else, the first two instrumental songs prove Uematsu, Hisaishi, Sugiyama, Iwadare, and Yoko Kanno are all fans of Yellow Submarine (not that that last one needed to be mentioned).

ajr82
10-19-2008, 01:38 PM
My social studies teacher in middle school played the softer version of Revolution in class once!

So, uh, Tomm and other people who just recently started buying all the Beatles albums, bad timing: the '87 remasters done for CD are generally considered very bad, and I heard that they're looking to do a careful new remaster of the music to rerelease on disc in 2009. So you get to buy it all over again next year!

You mean each of the instruments won't be hard-panned into just one stereo channel? Yay! The old CD versions sound okay over speakers, but they're abysmal on headphones.

Hopefully they won't compress the hell out of them. Love was pretty good on that count, but you never know.

Pooch
10-19-2008, 01:56 PM
It does kind of set a precedent here that it sounds more Sgt.Pepper/MMT than white album. Not clear why this album acts like White Album never happened. Enlightenment please?

Because even the "new" Beatle songs for the album were recorded before any of the White Album was even written.

-"Only a Northern Song" was written and recorded for Sgt. Pepper before being left off.

-Both "All Together Now" and "It's All Too Much" were recorded in May 1967, just before Sgt. Pepper was released.

-"Hey Bulldog" was recorded in February 1968 during the "Lady Madonna" sessions, which took place before the Beatles' trip to India that birthed most of the White Album songs. Also, it was during these same sessions that "Across the Universe" was recorded, though the song didn't show up on a Beatles record until "Let It Be" - and even then, only after Phil Spector had his way with it. (Edit: Actually, "Across the Universe" initially appeared on a charity LP, "No One's Gonna Change Our World," in 1969 - this version is on the Past Masters Vol. 2 CD; I forgot about this when initially writing out my post.)

The Beatles were quite indifferent toward the entire Yellow Submarine project; though the film came out in late 1968, the Beatles didn't want any soundtrack album interfering with sales of the White Album, so that (and their noted indifference toward the whole project) led to the Yellow Submarine album appearing in January of 1969 - as they were recording and filming "Let It Be."

Edit again: Having said all that, Yellow Submarine is an animated celebration of the Beatles' psychadelic period - production began in 1967 - so it's no wonder the soundtrack has a sorta ersatz-Sgt. Pepper feel. It just sounds massively out-of-place amongst the records it was released between.

And because I don't want to double-post:

You mean each of the instruments won't be hard-panned into just one stereo channel? Yay! The old CD versions sound okay over speakers, but they're abysmal on headphones.

Hopefully they won't compress the hell out of them. Love was pretty good on that count, but you never know.

Hopefully they'll do exactly what they did with the Capitol Records box sets: package both the mono and stereo versions together. Every single Beatles album through The White Album was mixed primarily with mono in mind - the Beatles, from Rubber Soul on, would spend weeks getting the mono mixes just right, while the stereo mixes were often dashed off in a day (which is exactly what happened in the case of Sgt. Pepper). The ping-pong stereo effect is hideous - George Martin has said the only reason he mixed them that way was to assist in the mono mixing process - but on the other hand, some of the recently remixed stuff (like the Yellow Submarine Songtrack) sounds a bit lifeless in comparison to the original mixes.

ajr82
10-19-2008, 04:13 PM
Hopefully they'll do exactly what they did with the Capitol Records box sets: package both the mono and stereo versions together. Every single Beatles album through The White Album was mixed primarily with mono in mind - the Beatles, from Rubber Soul on, would spend weeks getting the mono mixes just right, while the stereo mixes were often dashed off in a day (which is exactly what happened in the case of Sgt. Pepper). The ping-pong stereo effect is hideous - George Martin has said the only reason he mixed them that way was to assist in the mono mixing process - but on the other hand, some of the recently remixed stuff (like the Yellow Submarine Songtrack) sounds a bit lifeless in comparison to the original mixes.

Honestly, my preference would be to include the original mono mix and a new stereo mix. Those old stereo mixes aren't good for anything other than historical interest. The re-released version of Pet Sounds is probably the best example of this sort of thing.

Riot.EXE
10-19-2008, 04:51 PM
Check out this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbXLp2z6xL4)

...why is it that Beatles fans seem to uniformly hate "The Grey Album"?

Sheana
10-19-2008, 06:38 PM
Probably because a lot of them don't care for rap-related items. And a lot of folks don't like resampled/mashed-up music in general, it probably doesn't seem very artistic to them.

taidan
10-19-2008, 10:02 PM
oh lord, sound quality debates.

I should have shut my mouth.

Tomm Guycot
10-19-2008, 10:05 PM
Sneak preview guys: I feel kinda gypped by Abbey Road

taidan
10-19-2008, 10:21 PM
Sneak preview guys: I feel kinda gypped by Abbey Road

I did too at first. My mind was changed one night when I listened to the second half of the album while half asleep in a chair.

Sheana
10-19-2008, 10:26 PM
I will admit, I can take or leave a good chunk of the first half of Abbey Road.

But the Medley that makes up the ending/second half of the album is pure cheerful love, and I'm hard put to think of a band that ended their career on such a lively, interesting note. It puts a smile on my face.

Matchstick
10-19-2008, 10:38 PM
Sacrilege! Abbey Road is hands down my favorite Beatles album (taken as an overall album).

Sanagi
10-20-2008, 03:23 PM
Most of my favorite Beatles songs are on Abbey Road. The top two being Come Together and Because.

Tomm Guycot
10-20-2008, 04:28 PM
No really you guys. I just listened again and was completley not conscious of the second half of the album.

demonkoala
10-20-2008, 05:00 PM
Sacrilege!

I just love how sacrilege is an appropriate word for this conversation.

locit
10-20-2008, 05:14 PM
Abbey Road is awesome because it's everyone coming together after the mess that was Let It Be and saying "If we're going to go out on top, let's do it right." I love both halves, and rarely skip a track. Well, okay, I Want You (She's So Heavy) gets skipped more than most.

Oh! Darling is among my favourite songs for karaoke, provided my voice is in the right condition.

Sheana
10-20-2008, 05:32 PM
No really you guys. I just listened again and was completley not conscious of the second half of the album.

Then I feel oh so sorry for you.

Tomm Guycot
10-20-2008, 05:55 PM
Then I feel oh so sorry for you.

Well, why is it so great?

Sheana
10-20-2008, 06:20 PM
But the Medley that makes up the ending/second half of the album is pure cheerful love, and I'm hard put to think of a band that ended their career on such a lively, interesting note. It puts a smile on my face.

It's just the band putting all the previous drama aside to come together for a long bout of cheerful, skillfull music-making. A hodge podge of everything from the silly to the serious, full of energy.

The One Sweet Dream bit used to make me a bit emotional back in the day, and bits like Paul's singing on Golden Slumbers and John's snarky silliness on Polythene Pam stood out to me.

And in the end (oh look what I did there) you have what sounds like the musical equivalent of the band running around and cheering, finally finishing up the whole medley (and their career) with a very definite and climactic The End.

Tomm Guycot
10-20-2008, 07:20 PM
This is all completley moot by the fact Let it Be came out afterward

Sheana
10-20-2008, 07:59 PM
This is all completley moot by the fact Let it Be came out afterward

So what? It's more of a movie soundtrack than an actual album. And it was all done before Abbey Road, so Abbey Road is still the Beatles' last official work.

And The End was the last song. I don't want to hear about Her Majesty guys that's a hidden bonus thinger.

Sanagi
10-22-2008, 12:40 AM
I love the line "Once there was a way to get back home."

Golden Slumbers wins just on the strength of that line.

I can do without the Mustard and Polythene parts of the medley, though.

Alixsar
10-22-2008, 01:36 AM
It's just the band putting all the previous drama aside to come together for a long bout of cheerful, skillfull music-making. A hodge podge of everything from the silly to the serious, full of energy.

The One Sweet Dream bit used to make me a bit emotional back in the day, and bits like Paul's singing on Golden Slumbers and John's snarky silliness on Polythene Pam stood out to me.

And in the end (oh look what I did there) you have what sounds like the musical equivalent of the band running around and cheering, finally finishing up the whole medley (and their career) with a very definite and climactic The End.

This is all completley moot by the fact Let it Be came out afterward

And it was all done before Abbey Road, so Abbey Road is still the Beatles' last official work.

Bam. Sheana gets it. The only reason Let It Be came out after was because of Phil Spector's wankery. Otherwise it probably never would've seen the light of day...which would (mostly) be a good thing. Abbey Road is a fantastic way to cap off The Beatles' career. It's got a bit of everything: a bit of of their psychadelic stuff, a bit of their more pop-y stuff, and a bit of all of it with The Medley™. It's like listening to every Beatles album at once. There may be better songs on different albums, but there's nothing else that sums up what The Beatles were quite like Abbey Road.

Tomm Guycot
10-22-2008, 01:49 AM
Nooooo it's growing on me!

Pooch
10-22-2008, 07:52 AM
While Abbey Road is indeed the last album the Beatles made, they did do some work on Let It Be after Abbey Road was released (though John wasn't at those sessions). And it was before Phil Spector was involved, too. Despite that, it's kinda obvious Abbey Road was intended to be the last album, and I still think of it that way.

I just listened to Abbey Road again a couple of days ago, and I still get pumped up every time "The End" comes on - Ringo's little solo followed by Paul, George and John trading off guitar solos...sort of allowing everyone one final stand in the spotlight.

And I can't be the only one dorky enough to have used audio software to re-insert "Her Majesty" into its original spot in the Side 2 medley to hear how that would have originally worked out, right?

...Right?

Also:

Nooooo it's growing on me!

ONE OF US! ONE OF US!

Sheana
10-22-2008, 09:22 AM
Nooooo it's growing on me!

Boy, you've got to carry that weight a long time.

Paul le Fou
10-22-2008, 12:25 PM
Nooooo it's growing on me!

It was... inevitable.

(Sheana took the good one.)

Alixsar
10-22-2008, 01:44 PM
And I can't be the only one dorky enough to have used audio software to re-insert "Her Majesty" into its original spot in the Side 2 medley to hear how that would have originally worked out, right?

I made a playlist once that had Abbey Road on it, and I put Her Majesty in the "right" spot. Does that count?

Random question: you know that Beatles movie musical thing that came out a while back? Across the Universe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Across_the_Universe_(film))? Is that any good? I figured that this would be the thread to ask in. We don't need those non-Beatles fans opinions, you know?

Sheana
10-22-2008, 02:35 PM
Random question: you know that Beatles movie musical thing that came out a while back? Across the Universe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Across_the_Universe_(film))? Is that any good? I figured that this would be the thread to ask in. We don't need those non-Beatles fans opinions, you know?

I saw that in theaters on my birthday last year!

It's greatly, greatly flawed, but I enjoyed it and like it for the most part.

demonkoala
10-22-2008, 02:47 PM
Random question: you know that Beatles movie musical thing that came out a while back? Across the Universe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Across_the_Universe_(film))? Is that any good? I figured that this would be the thread to ask in. We don't need those non-Beatles fans opinions, you know?

I am in love with the movie.

JCDenton
10-23-2008, 11:51 AM
Random question: you know that Beatles movie musical thing that came out a while back? Across the Universe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Across_the_Universe_(film))? Is that any good? I figured that this would be the thread to ask in. We don't need those non-Beatles fans opinions, you know?

To balance out these somewhat positive statements: No, it was a painful experience. I had to stop watching 13 minutes in because I couldn't take it anymore. Incredibly forced, hackneyed and insultingly stupid, for my money.

Tomm Guycot
10-23-2008, 12:21 PM
Abbey Road

So I'll admit, I was wrong about this album. Like Sgt Pepper, it grew and grew on me until it was an essential Beatles experience. Listening to it makes me intensely happy. It was all you guys explaining the context that helped (one final "let's do it right" after some iffyness and uncertainty). Of course, that makes Let it be the "Chapter 6" to put this in DQIV terms. But we'll save that for my next writeup.

There are some classic songs on this album, like Come Together and Here Comes the Sun. Lennon's "shoot me" in the former makes me wonder if Mark David Chapman just thought he was a superfan who "got it." The latter might have become one of my favorite songs. It's the type of thing you request to have played at your funeral.

Most of the albums have a song that I hate at first that I come to really like. Octopus Garden was that. I dunno, it's just fun. Maxwell's Silver Hammer was stuck in my head when I woke up this morning. The switchups in tone with I Want You / She's so Heavy are great. For a 7 minute song, it never seems long.

Initially, the big 6 song marathon vanished and kind of blended together into one song, since there are no breaks. It kind of really bothered me. This is kind of odd because Greenday's Jesus of Suburbia pissed the hell out of me because it IS like four different songs that they claim is one so they get note for making the longest single punk song or some nonsense like that.
Someone tell me where Her Majesty "originally" went please
Anyway, the more I listened to it, I started to realize that each song leads into the one after it, even though you end up somewhere totally different at the end than where you started (though there are strains of You Never Give me your Money in Carry That Weight, which always reminds me of Bebop you know why.)

I think the transition from Mean Mr. Mustard to Polythene Pam might be the best music ever written.

So overall yeah, you guys are right. It's nice the band went and created a "this is our best" with a definite ending. I mean this is the Megaman 9 of the Beatles. ...kind of.

Song of the Album: Here Comes the Sun

Alixsar
10-23-2008, 03:36 PM
Someone tell me where Her Majesty "originally" went please.

I think the transition from Mean Mr. Mustard to Polythene Pam might be the best music ever written.

It's funny that you say that, because Her Majesty originally went in between Mean Mr. Mustard and Polythene Pam. The last note of Her Majesty was cut and, as far as I know, is lost. So even if you rearrange the tracks, the transition from Her Majesty to Polythene Pam doesn't work perfectly...but you can almost see how it would've been.

Tomm Guycot
10-23-2008, 04:08 PM
It's funny that you say that, because Her Majesty originally went in between Mean Mr. Mustard and Polythene Pam. The last note of Her Majesty was cut and, as far as I know, is lost. So even if you rearrange the tracks, the transition from Her Majesty to Polythene Pam doesn't work perfectly...but you can almost see how it would've been.

Where was this? on the vinyl?

WHy was it changed?

ALSO: in the previous thread someone mentioned a book that explains every single song and some info behind it? What was that book?

Pooch
10-23-2008, 04:22 PM
Where was this? on the vinyl?

WHy was it changed?

It's not quite like that. When the Beatles (well, Paul mostly) were working on the Side 2 medley, Paul originally had "Her Majesty" after "Mean Mr. Mustard," as Alixsar said (that's the final guitar chord of "Mean Mr. Mustard" at the start of "Her Majesty"). At some point, though, Paul decided he didn't want "Her Majesty" in the medley, and told the audio engineer to edit it out of the master tape. He did so in a somewhat hasty manner (hence the sudden start and end of "Her Majesty"); however, the engineer had been told to never throw anything away, so he put "Her Majesty" at the very end of the tape reel after a long silence, with the note "Not needed" on the tape box or something like that.

However, apparently Paul/the Beatles liked the effect, and they kept "Her Majesty" at the very end of the record when it was released.

locit
10-23-2008, 04:23 PM
ALSO: in the previous thread someone mentioned a book that explains every single song and some info behind it? What was that book?
A Hard Day's Write. (http://www.amazon.com/Hard-Days-Write-Revised-Stories/dp/0062736981) I have read it... too many times.

Red Hedgehog
10-23-2008, 05:04 PM
Maxwell's Silver Hammer was stuck in my head when I woke up this morning.

I get Maxwell's Silver Hammer stuck in my head all the damn time! It's just one of those songs.

Alixsar
10-23-2008, 08:11 PM
I get Maxwell's Silver Hammer stuck in my head all the damn time! It's just one of those songs.

Apparently the Beatles spent more time on that one song than any other for Abbey Road, mostly because Paul was absolutely obsessed with perfecting it. I really like it, but it's definitely not for everybody. Like you said, it's just one of those songs. It's too damn catchy for it's own good.

Sheana
10-23-2008, 08:57 PM
I like that it is an incredibly cheerful pop song about a serial killer!

ajr82
10-23-2008, 09:03 PM
ALSO: in the previous thread someone mentioned a book that explains every single song and some info behind it? What was that book?

In addition to A Hard Day's Write, there's also Revolution In The Head (http://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Head-Beatles-Records-Sixties/dp/1556527330/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1224817271&sr=8-1), which combines the stories behind the writing of the songs, a lot of the musical theory/composition in them, and the author's cantankerous complaining about moral relativism and how terrible everything, especially music, has been since the 1960s.

Sanagi
10-23-2008, 09:11 PM
If you want to annoy a classically trained musician, play "Because" alone, without the next song to resolve its final chord.

If you want to start an argument among music theory nerds, ask them how to notate the unusual rhythmic pattern from Here Comes the Sun.

Tomm Guycot
10-23-2008, 10:53 PM
In addition to A Hard Day's Write, there's also Revolution In The Head (http://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Head-Beatles-Records-Sixties/dp/1556527330/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1224817271&sr=8-1), which combines the stories behind the writing of the songs, a lot of the musical theory/composition in them, and the author's cantankerous complaining about moral relativism and how terrible everything, especially music, has been since the 1960s.

Thanks! That sounds... well, entirely unenjoyable.


RE: my tagline, walrus gumboot isn't some arcane drug reference right? I need to know these things.

Once I had a license plate that said "Born to be Plaid" and the P fell off for weeks before I noticed.

Guess it's a good thing I didn't go for "Plaid to the Bone"

Pooch
10-24-2008, 07:44 AM
RE: my tagline, walrus gumboot isn't some arcane drug reference right? I need to know these things.

It's more likely yet another Lennon reference to "I Am the Walrus" (see also "The walrus was Paul" in "Glass Onion" and "I was the walrus, but now I'm John" in John's solo song "God"); otherwise, the lyrics of "Come Together" mean mostly nothing - John called them gobbledygook and said the song was made up in the studio. There are some other obvious references: "He got Ono sideboard" is obviously a reference to Yoko, and "He Bag Production" references Bag Productions, which was John and Yoko's company in the late '60s. It was named that because John and Yoko promoted something called "Bagism," whereby someone would literally sit inside a bag and talk to people. They claimed it was "total communication" because you couldn't see - and therefore prejudge - who you were talking to, and thus had to pay attention to what was being said.

Perhaps interestingly, "Come Together" began as a campaign song for Timothy Leary's run for governor of California in 1969. His slogan was "Come together and join the party" (or something like that), and commissioned John to write a song. John did so, but never gave the song to Leary; instead he took the phrase "Come Together" and made an entirely new song out of it.

John was later sued by Chuck Berry's music publisher over the lines "Here come ol' flatop, he come groovin' up slowly" because they're similar to a couplet in Chuck Berry's song "You Can't Catch Me." The lawsuit led directly to John's 1975 album Rock 'N' Roll.

Edit: Wow, that was quite the tangent over a question about a single phrase of the song. I know waaaay more about the Beatles than is healthy.

Edit the 2nd: I also forgot that some think the lyrics to "Come Together" are about the Beatles themselves. "He one holy roller" = George, "Got to be good looking 'cause he's so hard to see" = Paul, "He got Ono sideboard" = John, etc.

Tomm Guycot
12-24-2008, 07:17 PM
you will notice I never updated for Let it Be.

This is not an oversight or a sign I never listened to it.

It is a statement as to my feelings on the album.

Anything worthwhile already appeared somewhere else. After Abbey Road it was such a huge disappointment.

locit
12-24-2008, 08:06 PM
Anything worthwhile already appeared somewhere else. After Abbey Road it was such a huge disappointment.
I like Two Of Us, I've Got A Feeling, For You Blue* and Maggie Mae. But yeah, Let It Be comes up kind of short after Abbey Road. Which is why I recommended you listen to it before said album!

*I much prefer the version on Anthology 3, though.

Sheana
12-24-2008, 08:26 PM
Two Of Us is one of my all-time favorite Beatles songs and I quite like Get Back (partly because of the rockin' Rooftop Concert), but yeah, overall Let It Be isn't all that spectacular.

Alixsar
12-24-2008, 08:59 PM
Across the Universe is the only song on Let It Be. Those other songs never happened.

Nothing you say can ever convince me that this is not the absolute truth. If you somehow convince me that this is true, my entire world would be destroyed.

Sheana
12-24-2008, 10:07 PM
I Dig A Pygmy By Charles Hortrey And The Deaf Aids, Phase One: In Which Doris Gets Her Oats.

Actually I'm kind of fond of George's 'I Me Mine' as well. It's got a nice haunting quality to it, and whenever I listen to it I always think about John and Yoko waltzing through the big, dark studio in the Let It Be movie doc.

Tomm Guycot
12-24-2008, 10:28 PM
Instead of listening to the album, I think when you put "Let it Be" into your music player of choice you are time-transported to the rooftop concert.

Pooch
12-25-2008, 08:02 AM
The biggest problem with Let It Be is that, outside of Paul, none of the others gave a crap (not too surprising, since the whole thing was Paul's idea). George quit the band halfway through the sessions (kinda like how Ringo quit the band during the White Album), John looks absolutely bored the entire time, and Ringo is just kinda there. It's amazing that only a few months later they were able to pull themselves back together and make Abbey Road.

The second biggest problem is the songs. Paul came up with some good songs (Two of Us, Let It Be, Get Back), but John only had two songs ready for the project (only one of which was released on the LP), and George's songs weren't among his best. I mean, "One After 909" had already been rejected by the band as far back as 1963, so it's rather telling that they hauled it back out for the Get Back project.

That said, it still has its moments. But Phil Spector didn't do the album many favors, despite John's comment that he took the "shittiest batch of shitty songs with a lousy feel to them and made something out of them" (or something like that; I'm paraphrasing).

Dhroo
12-26-2008, 07:54 PM
Across the Universe is the only song on Let It Be. Those other songs never happened.

Nothing you say can ever convince me that this is not the absolute truth. If you somehow convince me that this is true, my entire world would be destroyed.

what is wrong with you that you do not like Get Back

BodhiTraveller
12-26-2008, 08:05 PM
You know that Beatles movie musical thing that came out a while back? Across the Universe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Across_the_Universe_(film))? Is that any good? I figured that this would be the thread to ask in. We don't need those non-Beatles fans opinions, you know?

I enjoyed Across the Universe because I enjoy sitting in a room for a couple of hours and listening to the Beatles, but everything else about that movie was terrible. I don't mind that they made a plot that swerves around meaninglessly to include as many Beatles songs as possible, but they so do in a really lazy, groanful way. There are characters named Jude and Prudence.

Suggestion: Instead of watching Across the Universe, get some folks together with snacks and listen to the Beatles with the volume way up.

Tomm Guycot
07-06-2009, 12:38 AM
My girlfriend and I saw "LOVE" in Vegas on July 3rd. It was amazing. I was actually surprised by the range of the songs shown - they had a few that aren't in the "popular" set that get radio play on oldies stations (where I heard Beatles prior to exploring their catalog). At any rate I wasn't expecting to hear "Octopus's Garden" but not "Yellow Submarine" or "Magical Mystery Tour."

I recommend everyone see LOVE, whether or not they are into the Beatles. My girlfriend isn't but I think she came away with new appreciation.

THe coolest part was seeing these characters throughout the show and learning later which ones they were (from specific songs). Very cool.

Sheana
07-06-2009, 03:06 AM
I've had the LOVE soundtrack for ages and ages, and am very fond of it. I actually like their remix of Lady Madonna over the original; always wanted to see the show.

Thanks to the Rock Band intro circling the interwebs and timely shuffling of my iPod/iTunes, I've been remembering why I love The Beatles so much again lately.

Phantoon
07-06-2009, 05:10 AM
If you don't like Let It Be try Let It Be Naked. It's the album remastered with lots of little changes (most of the Phil Spector stuff is gone). It's supposedly closer to how it was meant to be originally. There's also changes in the selected songs too.

I disliked Let It Be, but the remaster I really like.

Sanagi
07-06-2009, 06:02 AM
I've had the LOVE soundtrack for ages and ages, and am very fond of it. I actually like their remix of Lady Madonna over the original; always wanted to see the show.
As a whole album experience I like Love more than any of the actual Beatles albums, although it's practically cheating to make the comparison because it ties together so many of their best songs without any filler.

Phantoon
07-06-2009, 06:18 AM
The other version of While My Guitar Gently Weeps on LOVE isn't as good as the original, though. Minor point against the album, but it's one of my favourites.

taidan
07-06-2009, 07:36 AM
I enjoyed Across the Universe because I enjoy sitting in a room for a couple of hours and listening to the Beatles, but everything else about that movie was terrible. I don't mind that they made a plot that swerves around meaninglessly to include as many Beatles songs as possible, but they so do in a really lazy, groanful way. There are characters named Jude and Prudence.

Suggestion: Instead of watching Across the Universe, get some folks together with snacks and listen to the Beatles with the volume way up.

Across the Universe always felt to me like a modern day version of the Sgt. Pepper film. My g/f had the soundtrack via her family, and when I finally played the real versions of the songs she couldn't go back.

Pooch
07-06-2009, 07:48 AM
Across the Universe always felt to me like a modern day version of the Sgt. Pepper film.

No lie, this was my exact impression as well. I was waiting for the Bee Gees and Peter Frampton to waltz on the screen at any given moment.

Let It Be...Naked annoys me on some level because, for all the braying about how it is more "pure" than Spector's Let It Be, the guys who made it still did copious amounts of editing and splicing (Let It Be - the song - is the most noticeable example of all, as you can really tell where they kept switching off between the single version and the film version - and sometimes mixing the two - and it's pretty off-putting), and in several cases used the exact same (or pretty similar) editing choices that Spector made (like I Me Mine and Dig a Pony).

As a hard-core Beatles fan, I'd more prefer if they'd released one of Glyn Johns' versions of the album (with stuff like Save the Last Dance For Me that still has never been released) or, hell, the entire rooftop concert.

Anyway, I still like the songs and all (and wish they'd release the film on DVD one of these days, like they've been claiming for the last ten years), but one could have easily made a CDR of nearly the same album by using the existing Let It Be album, Past Masters Vol. 2 and Anthology 3.

Sheana
07-06-2009, 01:31 PM
While the sappiness of The Long & Winding Road and its Spector strings nearly kills me every time I try to listen to it, I'm actually A-OK with and fond of the original Let It Be. Listening to Naked was alien and strange.

shivam
07-06-2009, 01:33 PM
so i don't 'get' elenor rigby. it's a story song without a point or an ending or a takeaway. what am i supposed to do with it?

alexb
07-06-2009, 01:35 PM
so i don't 'get' elenor rigby. it's a story song without a point or an ending or a takeaway. what am i supposed to do with it?

I don't know. Maybe it's just a rumination on all the sad, pointless, forgotten people there are in this world.

Phantoon
07-06-2009, 02:07 PM
It's a lament for the lonely, whose passing will be mourned by few.

Sheana
07-06-2009, 02:17 PM
Yeah, that's pretty much it. Look at all the lonely people. That song always makes me sad, even in the Yellow Submarine movie.

No Beatles song destroys me quite like She's Leaving Home, though. I try to avoid that one whenever possible.

Phantoon
07-06-2009, 02:34 PM
For No One gets me too. Desperately sad song.

Pooch
07-06-2009, 03:07 PM
In My Life is the one that gets me, though For No One does as well.

Tomm Guycot
07-06-2009, 03:09 PM
I've been meaning to ask, Sheana - is that anime Ringo?

Sheana
07-06-2009, 03:14 PM
For No One is pretty damn sad, but I can actually stand to listen to that one, hah. It's a favorite.

I've been meaning to ask, Sheana - is that anime Ringo?

My avatar? Nope, it's Sgt. Pepper George from the upcoming Rock Band: The Beatles' opening cinematic (http://www.thebeatlesrockband.com/cinematic.php). I am kind of in love with this little video.

Tomm Guycot
07-06-2009, 03:16 PM
For No One is pretty damn sad, but I can actually stand to listen to that one, hah. It's a favorite.



My avatar? Nope, it's Sgt. Pepper George from the upcoming Rock Band: The Beatles' opening cinematic (http://www.thebeatlesrockband.com/cinematic.php). I am kind of in love with this little video.

You and I are playing some online Beatles* this fall Sheana.



* there is online isn't there?

Sheana
07-06-2009, 03:27 PM
No idea! And I don't own any sort of console at the moment, not to mention the gear needed (there'll be Beatles-themed Special Edition instruments for this version of RB) being outside my unemployed ass' price range, so Guitar Hero and Rock Band and the like has always been me living vicariously through others, haha.

Even if I did have the capability I'm pretty positive I'd fail miserably at those games, as I lack rhythm so much it's not even funny. I can't even clap in time or whistle.

Pooch
07-06-2009, 03:34 PM
there'll be Beatles-themed Special Edition instruments for this version of RB

Yeah, and ye gods, they're expensive. Of course they look awesome, but $100 apiece is pretty appalling.

Tomm Guycot
07-06-2009, 04:31 PM
Also, for all you guys talking about the LOVE album, I personally think it's wasted without the visuals of the show. Seriously they do some crazy stuff.

Sheana
07-06-2009, 05:22 PM
I have a retardedly crazy, detailed and non-stop imagination, so I've done just fine with just the music so far. Though really this goes for all music with me.

MikeDinosaur
07-06-2009, 08:06 PM
No lie, this was my exact impression as well. I was waiting for the Bee Gees and Peter Frampton to waltz on the screen at any given moment.

Let It Be...Naked annoys me on some level because, for all the braying about how it is more "pure" than Spector's Let It Be, the guys who made it still did copious amounts of editing and splicing (Let It Be - the song - is the most noticeable example of all, as you can really tell where they kept switching off between the single version and the film version - and sometimes mixing the two - and it's pretty off-putting), and in several cases used the exact same (or pretty similar) editing choices that Spector made (like I Me Mine and Dig a Pony).

As a hard-core Beatles fan, I'd more prefer if they'd released one of Glyn Johns' versions of the album (with stuff like Save the Last Dance For Me that still has never been released) or, hell, the entire rooftop concert.

Yeah, I was actually pretty disappointed by the Glyn Johns mix. Certainly Long and Winding Road sounds better than it used to, but really, that's just not one of their best songs. Meanwhile, while it's fashionable to rip on Spector's stereo stuff, what he does with Across the Universe, if a little over the top, is pretty good, as is his stuff on I Me Mine. I think both become more because of his work.

demonkoala
07-07-2009, 03:09 AM
I've been meaning to ask, Sheana - is that anime Ringo?
Being tired and reading this, I defintiely saw a "Shiina Ringo" in there.

Pooch
07-07-2009, 04:21 AM
Yeah, I was actually pretty disappointed by the Glyn Johns mix. Certainly Long and Winding Road sounds better than it used to, but really, that's just not one of their best songs. Meanwhile, while it's fashionable to rip on Spector's stereo stuff, what he does with Across the Universe, if a little over the top, is pretty good, as is his stuff on I Me Mine. I think both become more because of his work.

I pretty much agree; I actually don't mind Spector's Let It Be at all. Sure, The Long and Winding Road is so over-the-top that it's laughable, but as John noted in one of his interviews, Spector wasn't exactly given Abbey Road (the album, not the studio) to work with.

That's not to say it's a great album, but I do like it. It has its own quirky charms.

Sheana
07-07-2009, 04:34 AM
I can't not love any album that has Get Back and Two Of Us on it.

Dhroo
07-07-2009, 09:11 PM
Let It Be(Phil Spector version) is easily one of my favorite Beatles albums, probably even over, say, Revolver or Rubber Soul. Apparently most people don't like it that much?

Pooch
07-08-2009, 06:34 AM
Let It Be(Phil Spector version) is easily one of my favorite Beatles albums, probably even over, say, Revolver or Rubber Soul. Apparently most people don't like it that much?

A lot of fans take issue with the orchestra and choir Spector added to several songs (Across the Universe, I Me Mine, Let It Be and The Long and Winding Road). They do this either because the orchestration is ridiculously heavy-handed (especially with The Long and Winding Road) or because Spector went against the original intent of the Get Back/Let It Be project, which was to record the Beatles live, with no overdubs or orchestration (the Get Back/Don't Let Me Down single was even tagged as "The Beatles As Nature Intended").

The biggest critic of Spector's Let It Be (and biggest proponent of the Let It Be...Naked project) is Paul McCartney himself, who has always hated what Spector did to The Long and Winding Road -- Paul even tried to get the song taken off of the LP, if I'm not mistaken (though it's amusing to note that, whenever he's played the song live, Paul has used a toned-down variation of Spector's version -- on Wings Over America the song has a horn section, and on Back in the U.S. there's synthesized strings).

In contrast, John always felt Spector did a good job (famously calling the original, non-Spector work "...the shittiest load of badly recorded shit with a lousy feeling to it ever..."), and George is quoted as saying Spector's orchestra stuff was a good idea. Ringo, meanwhile, used to be in favor of the Spector version, but changed his opinion and now says he prefers the original versions (perhaps conveniently, this was right around the time Let It Be...Naked was released).

Sheana
07-08-2009, 05:25 PM
Long & Winding Road is definite trash, but I thought the other three songs listed are just fine. Maybe it's because I grew up on them that way, but I can't imagine Let It Be or I Me Mine sounding any other way. It'd be wrong to my ears.

SilentSnake
09-03-2009, 12:52 PM
I think I'm going to get Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band today, my first Beatles album. I'll probably have more to say once I actually listen to it.

Jeanie
09-03-2009, 01:08 PM
No, wait until next week for the remasters.

SilentSnake
09-03-2009, 01:18 PM
No, wait until next week for the remasters.

Good thing I caught this! Thanks!

Jeanie
09-03-2009, 01:44 PM
De nada. Also I believe they'll be cheaper than the CDs already out. I know I saw an ad flier for where I work with them for $10.

Although if you really want to listen to Sgt. Pepper, you may know someone with the whole album on his hard drive already and he'd may be generous enough to give you a copy. Send me a PM and I can email you the files...

Pooch
09-03-2009, 02:08 PM
De nada. Also I believe they'll be cheaper than the CDs already out. I know I saw an ad flier for where I work with them for $10.

They'll probably be on sale at a lot of places, but everything -- with the exception of the White Album, which is now $25 (as opposed to $35) -- has the exact same MSRP as the old CDs ($18.99).

taidan
09-06-2009, 05:02 PM
Judging by the weekly flyers, a couple of stores are going to be selling these for 12, 13 bucks each. No idea if that's just an early thing for the release.

taidan
09-09-2009, 03:07 PM
Bump to say that the remasters are pretty solid. A few details here and there I never caught before, and the instruments and vocals sound more distinct.

djSyndrome
09-09-2009, 03:12 PM
I was (slightly) surprised to see some of these at Starbucks this morning. Believe they were $12.99?

Pooch
09-09-2009, 03:26 PM
Yeah, most places seem to have them on sale right now -- places like Best Buy seem to have them for around $12.99 or so.

And speaking of Best Buy, when I was checking their site this morning, I noted they have a listing for an imported copy of the mono box set...for $700 (no, that is not a typo).

Bergasa
09-09-2009, 03:53 PM
So which is the way to go here guys, mono or stereo? From reviews that I've read, it seems like the Mono mix is preferrable since it is the true intention of the Beatles (supposedly the Fab Four weren't even present for most of the mixing of the stereo versions).

Pooch
09-09-2009, 04:00 PM
So which is the way to go here guys, mono or stereo? From reviews that I've read, it seems like the Mono mix is preferrable since it is the true intention of the Beatles (supposedly the Fab Four weren't even present for most of the mixing of the stereo versions).

The bolded part is true...up until the White Album. In fact, they generally weren't even present for any mixing sessions up until Rubber Soul. They were usually on tour, or doing TV apperances, or whatever.

Honestly, it probably doesn't matter too much if you get the mono or stereo sets. But know that the mono albums are only available in an overpriced, limited edition box set currently, and none of the final three albums (Yellow Submarine, Abbey Road & Let It Be) are in mono, so you'd have to end up buying them separately.

I'd love to get the mono albums myself, but not for $300.

Sheana
09-10-2009, 07:42 PM
Anybody get their hands on any of the new Remastered stuff yet? A friend lent me some, and I'm checking it out. Decided to listen to Yellow Submarine first.

So far the remastering work on the songs is ranging from 'hey pretty nice clarity and channel separation' to 'holy shit!!" levels. Some songs are affected slightly, some incredibly. At the moment All Too Much is blowin' my freakin' mind.

taidan
09-10-2009, 07:57 PM
Anybody get their hands on any of the new Remastered stuff yet? A friend lent me some, and I'm checking it out. Decided to listen to Yellow Submarine first.

So far the remastering work on the songs is ranging from 'hey pretty nice clarity and channel separation' to 'holy shit!!" levels. Some songs are affected slightly, some incredibly. At the moment All Too Much is blowin' my freakin' mind.

I got the Stereo Boxset. I agree about All Too Much. Overall, the changes are on an album to album basis. Their early stuff has a more distinct separation between voices and instuments, I felt like a lot of tunes on Help were clearer. Rubber Soul and Revolver weren't as dramatic, but the dynamics are stronger. White Album benefits pretty well all over.

Little Sampson
09-10-2009, 08:07 PM
I wanted to get some of the remasters, but I couldn't afford getting the whole set at once, so I got Sgt. Pepper's and The White Album. (I would've gotten Abbey Road over The White Album, but Best Buy was sold out) Overall, I'm enjoying them very much, and they have helped refuel my love for the Beatles.

Sheana
09-10-2009, 08:12 PM
I'm going to spend all night wondering who that is yelling gibberish in the back of Birthday now.

After listening to a bunch more songs, one of the big differences that really stands out to me is I can actually hear Paul play his bass now! So many songs where I just never noticed it before.

locit
09-10-2009, 09:44 PM
I have all of these albums handily available on my computer and now I want to purchase them again. What have you people done to me?

taidan
09-10-2009, 10:18 PM
At the very least, listening to all these albums on a near constant basis since Sunday, I have been inspired to break out the guitar again and start practicing.

ajr82
09-11-2009, 07:49 AM
Penny Lane sounds so much better.

Matchstick
09-11-2009, 05:02 PM
I picked up the mono box and the 3 stereo albums. I don't know the old albums like the back of my hand, so the differences aren't always as obvious as they might be to others, but they definitely sound better overall to me than the previous CDs I had.

Pooch
09-11-2009, 07:08 PM
3D Yellow Submarine Remake Confirmed (http://www.slashfilm.com/2009/09/11/disney-confirms-robert-zemeckis-3d-yellow-submarine/)

Ugh.

Animate Nihilist
09-11-2009, 07:11 PM
3D Yellow Submarine Remake Confirmed (http://www.slashfilm.com/2009/09/11/disney-confirms-robert-zemeckis-3d-yellow-submarine/)

Ugh.

Are they going to use the original audio or have people imitate John and George?

Pooch
09-11-2009, 07:16 PM
Well, the original film didn't have any Beatle voices in it anyway (aside from the songs and brief live-action clip at the end), so that won't be a concern.

Sheana
09-11-2009, 07:25 PM
I've more or less resigned myself to crappy remakes, but few things make me as angry as the concept of a Zemeckis-Disney 3D mocap remake of Yellow freakin' Submarine. No. Just, no. It's a landmark piece of work that's 100% a product of its times, and not something that can be redone and have the same atmosphere and feeling. But mainly:

NOT EVERYTHING HAS TO BE 3D

Goddamn I'm getting sick of this 3D obsession. Zemeckis and his fixation on creepy motion capture in particular irks me.

You want to introduce today's kids to the magic of Yellow Submarine? So show them the original movie.

Animate Nihilist
09-11-2009, 07:26 PM
Well, the original film didn't have any Beatle voices in it anyway (aside from the songs and brief live-action clip at the end), so that won't be a concern.

Wow, I always thought it was really the Beatles doing the voice acting.

Pooch
09-11-2009, 07:29 PM
Wow, I always thought it was really the Beatles doing the voice acting.

Nope! In fact, the same guy does the voices for George and Ringo (to an extent; the original George voice actor did some work, then was arrested for deserting the British army, so "Ringo" took over).

Dizzy
09-11-2009, 08:03 PM
Zemeckis and his fixation on creepy motion capture in particular irks me.

It should irk you because he is a misanthrope who refuses to make movies depicting real human beings.

The Yellow Submarine was really boring. I wouldn't be surprised if kids today were turned off by it.

Sheana
09-11-2009, 08:06 PM
I think plenty of little kids would enjoy it. It's silly and colorful with adorable music. I know lots of younger folks that love the movie already, and I remember when my dad tracked down a then-hard-to-find copy on VHS to show us when we were really little. I adored it from the get-go, and later when we actually owned a copy it got a whole lot of play.

Dizzy
09-11-2009, 08:08 PM
Well you know, a lot of things targeted to kids are silly and colorful with adorable music. Like Pixar movies. If Pixar got behind this would you still be upset?

Sheana
09-11-2009, 08:39 PM
I'd be slightly less mad because I have greater faith in Pixar than Robert freakin' Zemeckis, but yes, I would still be very disappointed.

Adrenaline
09-12-2009, 05:09 PM
So I'm listening to the remaster of Sgt. Pepper's.

This is a good band.

locit
09-13-2009, 12:09 PM
So I'm listening to the remaster of Rubber Soul. I was in a café getting a pastry and the Beatles were playing and I had a conversation with the girl behind the register about the Beatles and she had three of their LPs and there was my favourite album just sitting within reach and hey it does have cleaned-up audio...

Damn it I'm so weak.

Sheana
09-13-2009, 04:23 PM
It's hard to resist. And VH1's currently showing the Anthology doc, so my family's had that on all day.

Speaking of Anthology, turns out I never heard the special CDs that went with this doc back in the day, with their outtakes and alternates and random bits. I can't rightly call myself a Beatlemaniac without having heard it, so I'm checking that out alongside the Remasters now.

I like how much of the music the Beatles made, official and otherwise, consists of Paul trying to sing while John dicks around in the background.

Azar
09-13-2009, 04:37 PM
I think plenty of little kids would enjoy it. It's silly and colorful with adorable music. I know lots of younger folks that love the movie already, and I remember when my dad tracked down a then-hard-to-find copy on VHS to show us when we were really little. I adored it from the get-go, and later when we actually owned a copy it got a whole lot of play.
Yellow Submarine may have been the first movie I ever saw. My dad was a big fan of it, I think, and somewhere around the age of 1 or 2 I remember him playing it for me. I guess I liked it.

Animate Nihilist
09-13-2009, 04:57 PM
It's hard to resist. And VH1's currently showing the Anthology doc, so my family's had that on all day.

Speaking of Anthology, turns out I never heard the special CDs that went with this doc back in the day, with their outtakes and alternates and random bits. I can't rightly call myself a Beatlemaniac without having heard it, so I'm checking that out alongside the Remasters now.

I like how much of the music the Beatles made, official and otherwise, consists of Paul trying to sing while John dicks around in the background.

I've spent hours listening to the anthology cds but I've never actually seen the documentary, is it worth watching?

Pooch
09-13-2009, 04:59 PM
I like how, at the end of Ringo's drum track/edit piece at the end of "Strawberry Fields Forever" on Anthology 2, you can hear George Martin in the background once Ringo finishes: "All right, calm down, Ringo. Calm down!"

Sheana
09-13-2009, 05:13 PM
I've spent hours listening to the anthology cds but I've never actually seen the documentary, is it worth watching?

Oh, I'd say so. I remember my whole family and I watching it when it first aired on TV in the '90s, we taped all we could on VHS. My folks also gave me the Anthology book a few years later.

I believe it was the first time all three (then) surviving Beatles had been interviewed about the band in many many years, and were all jovial about it and friendly with each other again. Nice archival footage, interview segments, et cetera.

Also: Paul broke a glass Paul broke a glass broke a glass broke a glass glass glass.

Pooch
09-13-2009, 05:22 PM
If you can find the Anthology DVDs, rent them or something. The home video/DVD set is longer than what was originally broadcast on TV. Plus, the DVD box set has a bonus DVD with stuff like Paul, George and Ringo jamming in the studio, and the three of them at Abbey Road with George Martin going over a few songs (and George Harrison constantly forgetting which songs were on which albums -- they're talking about "Golden Slumbers" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" and he keeps going, "Which album was that on?"), among other things.

mr_bungle700
09-13-2009, 07:12 PM
Anthology does an excellent job of capturing the magnitude and energy of the whole Beatles thing, and it has tons of great footage and behind-the-scenes information. It's a shame that I missed the chance to see it on TV today. Now I'm in the mood to watch it again.

Psyael
09-13-2009, 08:22 PM
People talking about "return of Beatlemania" piss me off. Seriously, hasn't anyone figured out that they do this about once every decade or so?

The last "return of Beatlemania" was the release of Free as a Bird, accompanied with biographies and stuff of the band taking over the primetime schedule ABC for something close to three days.

Sheana
09-13-2009, 09:06 PM
No, the last one was when they put out the 1 CD of hit singles. There is a new mini-Beatlemania every few years, though. Whenever a Beatle dies, when they put out Anthology, when they put out 1, and now with Rock Band/the Remasters. Since there's always people being born, there's always new young folks to discover the music for the first time and get excited. Then it quiets down again, then something else happens and it starts up again.

That's the power of The Beatles for you, I guess. It doesn't take much for the excitement to pop up and folks to get super into it. The same thing'll probably be going on decades from now.

ajr82
09-30-2009, 03:58 PM
Here's a quick guide to whether I want to listen to a given song right now:

1. Is the song "I've Just Seen A Face"?
- If YES, than I want to listen to the song
- If NO, than I will put on "I've Just Seen A Face" instead

taidan
09-30-2009, 04:01 PM
That's the one song I've been trying to learn the chords too. Its been fun!

Alastor
09-30-2009, 04:07 PM
It really is a beautiful song. I hear tell it's one of the few Beatles tracks without recorded bass? I hope that doesn't stop Harmonix from getting it in RB.

Calorie Mate
09-30-2009, 04:36 PM
Man, mathematically speaking, 78.9% of the reason I ever listen to the Beatles is because of the bass. Yes, I just made that number up, but the point still stands!


Also, I was listening to some of the remasters this weekend and man, I still don't like the Sgt. Pepper album, no matter how many times I try. Ah, well. At least Abbey Road is worth listening to occasionally.

ArugulaZ
09-30-2009, 05:19 PM
I just started collecting Beatles albums, so this thread couldn't have been timed better.

I don't like everything the Beatles did, even in their later, more sophisticated years. The weird, surreal nonsense like Yoko Ono talking about a "puu-puu platter" at the end of A Day in the Life I could definitely do without... now I can understand why fans thought she was poison to the band.

However! Some of this stuff is great. I really dig Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, particularly (most of) A Day in the Life, Lovely Rita, Good Morning Good Morning, and the two title tracks. I quite enjoy the medley of songs on Abbey Road as well... how each one could stand alone but the songs come together perfectly. I wish Rush could have mastered this with their own theme albums!

Sheana
09-30-2009, 05:35 PM
Here's a quick guide to whether I want to listen to a given song right now:

1. Is the song "I've Just Seen A Face"?
- If YES, than I want to listen to the song
- If NO, than I will put on "I've Just Seen A Face" instead

I've Just Seen A Face is one of my Top Ten favorite Beatles songs of all time. I adore it greatly.

I've mentioned it before, but one of the big things about the Remastered albums is how much clearer the bass guitar work is now, and how much I'm realizing a lot of bass work in general suffered when albums were first mixed digitally and put out on CD. I'd always heard about how Paul McCartney was one of the best bass guitarists out there, but I'm only just now going "wow hey this is good I guess they were right".

And despite the fact that Paul's always been my least-favorite Beatle (not saying much since it's The Beatles), between the amount of his solo/Wings work I've been listening to lately and checking out The Beatles with a new ear for bass and realization of how much of the best output was Paul-centric, I think I'm starting to like him a lot more oh crap.

ArugulaZ
09-30-2009, 05:57 PM
My least favorite was Lennon. Sorry.

I have to wonder if Ringo Starr was the least talented member of The Beatles, or just the least confident. There's absolutely nothing wrong with The Octopus's Garden, which he composed, but it was the only song he'd made for Abbey Road. Jeremy told me a long time ago that the rest of The Beatles repeatedly tried to convince Ringo to do extended drum solos, and he refused. What convinced him to stay hidden in the background, anyway? Has he ever explained this, or is this one of these mysteries that he'll take with him to the grave?

Pooch
09-30-2009, 05:59 PM
It really is a beautiful song. I hear tell it's one of the few Beatles tracks without recorded bass? I hope that doesn't stop Harmonix from getting it in RB.

The "Oh shit there's no bass/what is Harmonix going to do?" list:

I've Just Seen a Face
Yesterday
Eleanor Rigby
Love You To
She's Leaving Home
Within You, Without You
The Inner Light
Wild Honey Pie
Blackbird
I Will
Julia
Mother Nature's Son
Revolution 9
Good Night
Two of Us
Across the Universe
Her Majesty

And despite the fact that Paul's always been my least-favorite Beatle (not saying much since it's The Beatles), between the amount of his solo/Wings work I've been listening to lately and checking out The Beatles with a new ear for bass and realization of how much of the best output was Paul-centric, I think I'm starting to like him a lot more oh crap.

Admittedly, I'm a much bigger Paul fan than most, but it seems a lot of the time people love to bash Paul because it's the thing to do. I can understand people not liking his more syrupy stuff (even though he's done a lot more than "Silly Love Songs"), but I don't get the people who trash Paul and say John was more "real" or whatever -- John had more than his fair share of light, silly love songs (and downright crap -- I'm looking at you, Some Time in New York City).

Edit:

I have to wonder if Ringo Starr was the least talented member of The Beatles, or just the least confident. There's absolutely nothing wrong with The Octopus's Garden, which he composed, but it was the only song he'd made for Abbey Road. Jeremy told me a long time ago that the rest of The Beatles repeatedly tried to convince Ringo to do extended drum solos, and he refused. What convinced him to stay hidden in the background, anyway? Has he ever explained this, or is this one of these mysteries that he'll take with him to the grave?

Well, Ringo has gone on record saying he's not a good songwriter (he loves to say that he was great at re-writing songs that had already been written) -- in fact, in Let It Be you can see George helping Ringo compose "Octopus's Garden," so it should probably really be credited Starkey/Harrison.

And Ringo has also gone on record extensively saying flashy drumming and solos just aren't his style. He prefers to complement the music rather than trying to showboat his abilities (and even though people love to trash Ringo's drumming, he was -- above all else -- an excellent timekeeper, which enabled the Beatles to do a zillion takes of songs and splice them together seamlessly, because Ringo rarely ever messed up in the studio).

Sheana
09-30-2009, 06:56 PM
Probably a combo of talent and confidence. Ringo's a downhome-y little "t'weren't nothin'" kinda guy who never liked drum solos and flashiness. What was said already, basically! There probably was a bit of feeling inadequate here and there, especially towards the end, where he felt like he wasn't contributing and left the band, and was coaxed back with flowers and stuff. Ringo fit perfectly with the band because of his personality and how well he gelled with the others, and because of how as mentioned he's an excellent time keeper who knew just how to compliment a song well.

A big part of it was probably his lack of education, since he spent a chunk of his childhood in the hospital and got minimal schooling. I don't think he learned to read until he was like 8 years old and he's said that he still has a lifelong problem with spelling and so on, which can be a big hit to the confidence.

But then I think about when I was reading the Anthology book and how the author(s) commented on how they thought Ringo came off as the most quietly clever of the bunch in his own way. Who knows. I always liked Ringo because of the fact that when the other three were all fighting with each other, they were still best buddies with Ringo. I read The Last Days Of Lennon in high school for a project, a memoir by Lennon's assistant from '79 till his death (when Yoko tossed him out), and John was always beside himself with joy whenever "Ritchie" came to visit. And when Lennon got killed, Ringo materialized instantly to comfort Sean & Yoko.

My dislike of Paul stemmed from a combination of the whole "Silly Love Song" aspect (there's only so much syrupy lovey-doveyness I can take), and how he got towards the end of The Beatles. A control freak can be needed, especially with how Lennon got in the last few years, but there's also crossing the line. It was very telling in the Let It Be movie when Ringo, George and John were having a ball messing around with Ringo's Octopus Garden idea, and then Paul walked in and it all ground to a sullen halt. He's also been a bit obnoxious with his vegetarianism and other activism. Props to him for the love of his life being a rather homely divorcee mom, though.

I used to be hardcore into Lennon in my teens, but I've cooled on him considerably since. He was still an extremely clever and hilarious man who made great contributions to music, but he was also a bit of a confrontational dick whose output started to dwindle and whose solo work after is barely listenable to outside of a handful of songs.

TL;DR: George Harrison was the secret Best Beatle.

Pooch
09-30-2009, 07:14 PM
Another reason Paul created tension -- besides his perfectionist nature -- is the fact that he's the best musician in the Beatles, and can play a bunch of instruments. Starting with Help!, Paul began to play more and more lead guitar -- which was George's area, so he started to feel left out (and, like in Let It Be, even when George was allowed to play lead, Paul would try to dictate what he played). Then when Ringo quit, Paul moved over to drums (even though, back then, he was a pretty limited drummer). Then there are all those songs on the White Album where Paul played everything, and that didn't help the already tense feelings between the lads.

However, I never bought John's complaints that the Beatles spent too much time on Paul's work while neglecting his (John's) songs. As John loved to say to whomever would listen: the Beatles were his band and he was the leader. All he had to do was open his damn mouth if he wanted to spend more time on his songs. Paul may have been a bit of a prima donna (and I'm also one who tires of his excessive pro-veggie stance, which includes even going so far to criticize the Dalai Lama because he eats meat), but John was the one who spent most of his post-Beatles life putting down pretty much everything and everyone he came into contact with as a Beatle.

TL;DR: George Harrison was the secret Best Beatle.

Ringo is funny in the Anthology, but George is hilarious. John was known as the witty Beatle, but George -- for my money -- was the funniest one. Then again, I love dry wit, and George has that in spades.

shivam
09-30-2009, 07:29 PM
So if listening to the first few albums is doing it wrong, what should i listen to?

Sheana
09-30-2009, 07:29 PM
Ringo is funny in the Anthology, but George is hilarious. John was known as the witty Beatle, but George -- for my money -- was the funniest one. Then again, I love dry wit, and George has that in spades.

Indeed. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSIjlUMV6Is) The fact that he funded Life Of Brian and Time Bandits was a definite clue as well, I'd say. He was also the one Beatle who showed up on SNL when Lorne Michaels tried to get them to reunite, hah.

It's been a while since I read it, but my one big memory of George in the Anthology book was the fact that for all his spirituality and niceness and everything, the man swore like a goddamned sailor as often as possible.

Shivam: I'd say Help! onwards would be the best best. That's where they really started to get away from cover songs and the basic, same-y kind of songs and really branched out in ability and tone.

ajr82
09-30-2009, 07:36 PM
I don't really love Sgt. Pepper's as much as most of their other albums, but putting A Day In The Life at the end, after the "concert", is probably the single best bit of track sequencing in popular music. It's just sublime.

Tomm Guycot
09-30-2009, 07:48 PM
Ringo always seems so happy when he's singing in Beatles Rock Band. It always makes ME smile too, though he's a bit distracting in that way if it's a tricky section.

Strange the game has that quality.

Pooch
09-30-2009, 07:50 PM
Indeed. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSIjlUMV6Is) The fact that he funded Life Of Brian and Time Bandits was a definite clue as well, I'd say. He was also the one Beatle who showed up on SNL when Lorne Michaels tried to get them to reunite, hah.

I love that Rutland Weekend Television clip. I also like George's cameo in the Rutles film (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zciiuMLh9_M). It's a bit meatier than his cameo in Life of Brian, at least.

And, oddly enough, Lorne Michael's $3,000 offer to the Beatles is one of the things that led to the Rutles film being made.

Also, I've always wondered what would have happened if John and Paul had taken Lorne Michaels up on his offer -- Paul was visiting John at the Dakota that night, and the two of them very nearly made the trek down to NBC Studios when the offer was made (and that was the basis of that shitty VH-1 original movie Two of Us several years back...).

Also, I agree that Help! is a decent place to start, though it's still a bit of a transitory album between the early Beatlemania discs and the stuff that came after. The thing with the Beatles is they covered so much ground on their albums it's hard to recommend just one or two.

Sheana
09-30-2009, 07:51 PM
Oh, almost forgot. George had the best music video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_niy2ZM5Jo), too.

Tomm: that's a big part of the Beatles that I've always felt, and which has kept me loving the music all these years. There's always something about a big majority of their music that seems so downright happy and joyful that I can't help but smile because of it.

Pooch: Help! is still very transitory with a few covers and stuff, but it's got enough great material to make it worth the time. I can't say no to an album that has You've Got To Hide Your Love Away, The Night Before, Ticket To Ride, I've Just Seen A Face, Another Girl and Yesterday on it, among others.

Tomm Guycot
09-30-2009, 07:52 PM
If you want to understand their progression but don't want to sift through four albums of it, start on Hard Day's Night, then Help!, then forward.

If you just want to hop in when they get really good, start with Help!

If you don't believe you'd like them and think we're wasting your time, start with Rubber Soul.

If you only want the best of the best, get Help!, Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt. Pepper, and Abbey Road.

ArugulaZ
09-30-2009, 08:01 PM
Oh, almost forgot. George had the best music video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_niy2ZM5Jo), too.

Holy shit, it looks like he's trapped in Pee-Wee's Playhouse!

Pooch
09-30-2009, 08:05 PM
Magical Mystery Tour is pretty amazing, too, if you can get past the weaker "soundtrack" songs (Flying, Blue Jay Way). Though it's pretty much Sgt. Pepper part 2.

Sheana: I totally agree with you about Help! ("Tell Me What You See" has long been one of my absolute favorite songs...heck, the second half of side two compares with any stretch of songs on any Beatles album), I'm just trying to think along the lines of what Shivam might get into. If he's bored by the first few albums, Help! might not be the best place to start.

(And George's other video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7AdMPmItLI) from the Cloud 9 album is pretty fab too -- and it features Ringo!)

Sheana
09-30-2009, 08:10 PM
I dunno if "trapped" is the right word for it, Arugula, he seems to be enjoying himself in there.

Pooch: I think things had progressed enough with a lot of the songs to be more interesting, but that is a good point with Help!.

Just remembered another old McCartney turn-off: he was a Mullet Pioneer. Oh my lord, the '70s McCartney mullet. It burnsss.

ArugulaZ
09-30-2009, 08:13 PM
Oh crap, guess I'll have to get THAT one, too. I do like the title track...

What's on Rubber Soul? Anything I'd remember from mainstream radio? As long as it's not "She Loves You, Yeah Yeah Yeah" inanity or Yoko's brand of self-important surrealism ("Numbah Eight! {belch} Numbah Eight! {belch}") I'm game.

Pooch
09-30-2009, 08:20 PM
Some songs you may know from Rubber Soul/radio favorites/whatever:

Drive My Car (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pInMD723aJ8)
Norwegian Wood (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lY5i4-rWh44)
Nowhere Man (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvLj72apGLI)
Michelle (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zt03rPhtzdQ)
I'm Looking Through You (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0_PiVNLiuc)
In My Life (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NWk6rXxGzA)
If I Needed Someone (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoQziDVYoe8)

Yoko doesn't show up until the White Album.

Sheana
09-30-2009, 08:21 PM
Rubber Soul is where they really started to finally branch out and get interesting, so definitely! Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown), Nowhere Man, Michelle, Girl, I'm Looking Through You and In My Life are on it.

EDIT: Pooch beat me. Guys I could talk about The Beatles all day if you didn't notice.

Parish
09-30-2009, 08:31 PM
So if listening to the first few albums is doing it wrong, what should i listen to?

Actually, no, you're doing it right. Start from the beginning and work your way through Abbey Road. You'll really appreciate their growth as musicians that way.

JDS
09-30-2009, 08:58 PM
The Beatles had an interesting evolution, simplifying their melodies as their themes expanded and winding up doing mostly minimalist roots music by the end. The early stuff is undervalued, with people being too distracted by the "boy-girl" subject matter to notice John and Paul trying to outdo each other's melodic gymnastics; there hasn't been the like of chord changes before or since. Sometimes Hard Day's Night is my favorite album.

taosterman
09-30-2009, 08:59 PM
And if you don't start from the beginning you won't hear IT WON'T BE LONG YEAH (YEAH!) YEAH (YEAH!) YEAH (YEAH!)

shivam
09-30-2009, 10:29 PM
the first two albums were so boring as to be muzak for me.

Sheana
09-30-2009, 10:42 PM
Well yeah, the first two albums are kind of nothin' compared to what came later. Ain't no contest.

Healy
09-30-2009, 11:36 PM
Gosh, this thread got kicked up a notch when I wasn't looking.

Anyways, something I've been thinking about: I listened to Sgt. Pepper and Abbey Road last week for the first time (my family wasn't much for the Beatles), yet I couldn't shake the feeling that I've heard most of the lesser known songs (particularly the ones that make up the Abbey Road medley) when I was a kid. Is it because some of them were played on TV or radio without my knowing it, or did the composers for the stuff I liked as a kid take a lot of inspiration from these albums, or is that just the way the Beatles affect people?

Tomm Guycot
10-01-2009, 01:56 AM
Gosh, this thread got kicked up a notch when I wasn't looking.

Anyways, something I've been thinking about: I listened to Sgt. Pepper and Abbey Road last week for the first time (my family wasn't much for the Beatles), yet I couldn't shake the feeling that I've heard most of the lesser known songs (particularly the ones that make up the Abbey Road medley) when I was a kid. Is it because some of them were played on TV or radio without my knowing it, or did the composers for the stuff I liked as a kid take a lot of inspiration from these albums, or is that just the way the Beatles affect people?

That depends. How many times have you played through EarthBound?

The Beatles had an interesting evolution

You say it's all evolution? Well you know we all want to change the world

Sanagi
10-01-2009, 02:32 AM
One of the things I love about Rock Band Beatles is this perfect image of them always getting along and just being cool.

As it happens, I just watched the Simpsons where Ringo Starr gets around to reading Marge's fan letter and responds. He's so great in that - even though, according to the commentary, he was kind of annoyed at having been given a bunch more lines since they first approached him.

TL;DR: George Harrison was the secret Best Beatle.
Yes

I first started really paying attention to the Beatles after getting "Love" and one of my major realizations was "George Harrison has all the best songs."*

*Except Come Together and Because

cool onion
10-01-2009, 02:48 AM
i remember as a kid i had no concept of the beatles as anything other than the beatlemania, "i wanna hold your hand"-style love song band, until one day my brother and i were helping our dad sort old records and he put on (i think) the yellow submarine soundtrack. i don't think i've ever been so confused.

ArugulaZ
10-01-2009, 02:49 AM
Check it out, I'm looking into an onion with glasses!

JDS
10-01-2009, 04:15 AM
Gosh, this thread got kicked up a notch when I wasn't looking.

Anyways, something I've been thinking about: I listened to Sgt. Pepper and Abbey Road last week for the first time (my family wasn't much for the Beatles), yet I couldn't shake the feeling that I've heard most of the lesser known songs (particularly the ones that make up the Abbey Road medley) when I was a kid. Is it because some of them were played on TV or radio without my knowing it, or did the composers for the stuff I liked as a kid take a lot of inspiration from these albums, or is that just the way the Beatles affect people?

You probably saw this. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sgt._Pepper%27s_Lonely_Hearts_Club_Band_%28film%29 ) The songs are mostly drawn from Pepper and Abbey Road.

Pooch
10-01-2009, 06:58 AM
One of the things I love about Rock Band Beatles is this perfect image of them always getting along and just being cool.

No lie, I giggled when I first saw the in-game footage of "Back in the U.S.S.R." and the lads are all happy and playing together in the studio, especially considering that was the first song they recorded after Ringo quit. But I guess it would have been weird had the Harmonix guys made an accurate dreamscape where John, Paul and George all play drums and bass on the song and Ringo is nowhere to be found.

Calorie Mate
10-01-2009, 10:48 AM
Shivam - since you've expressed apathy for the Beatles in the past, it sounds like you're trying to simply find something you like of theirs, rather than appreciate their growth as musicians. If that's the case, I'd say start with Abbey Road (their best), and if you like it, then go through some of their earlier stuff and appreciate the progression that leads to that record.

(Basically, I'm guessing you need motivation before you want to deal with the nuances of how much better they got over time.)

Healy
10-01-2009, 11:18 AM
That depends. How many times have you played through EarthBound?


Well, that depends on what you mean by play-through, but my family has owned the game since I was six or so, and I used to get a kick out of playing other people's saves. I don't think I got past Onett on my own until a couple years back, but I still liked to listen to the town music.

You probably saw this. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sgt._Pepper%27s_Lonely_Hearts_Club_Band_%28film%29 ) The songs are mostly drawn from Pepper and Abbey Road.

I don't think I've ever seen that, unless I caught tiny bits and pieces of it on TV.

Pooch
10-01-2009, 11:59 AM
I don't think I've ever seen that, unless I caught tiny bits and pieces of it on TV.

Count yourself lucky, then, because it's really quite bad. And not in a "so bad it's entertaining" kind of way...it's just embarrassing to watch.

Knight
10-01-2009, 12:00 PM
Ringo always seems so happy when he's singing in Beatles Rock Band. It always makes ME smile too, though he's a bit distracting in that way if it's a tricky section.

Strange the game has that quality.
I've noticed that Ringo always seems happy in every song in B:RB. You're definitely right that it is distracting. The camera pans over Ringo drumming, and he has that smile on his face, and I can't help but smile too. It doesn't help that if my wife is only watching, or if there's a gap in the vocals where the camera does that, she can't help but point out how adorable they made Ringo look.

Ringo is our favorite, but Paul comes in as a close second for me, even if he does have that annoying activism stuff.

Tomm Guycot
10-01-2009, 12:11 PM
Shivam - since you've expressed apathy for the Beatles in the past, it sounds like you're trying to simply find something you like of theirs, rather than appreciate their growth as musicians. If that's the case, I'd say start with Abbey Road (their best), and if you like it, then go through some of their earlier stuff and appreciate the progression that leads to that record.

(Basically, I'm guessing you need motivation before you want to deal with the nuances of how much better they got over time.)

Given Shivam's leanings I guarantee he'd like Rubber Soul or Revolver better than Abbey Road.

MikeDinosaur
10-01-2009, 01:24 PM
People posting about their trouble with the early stuff the Beatles did should really watch the Hard Day's Night movie; I always liked that stuff ok, but I certainly didn't understand how people would scream and cry when they saw them. I get it now. They were just the living platonic form of youth and happiness, and of a world where anything is possible. When they're hopping around and smiling and singing, I kept putting my hands to my face because it was making me so unbearably elated. And it's funny, and just a genuinely brilliantly put together movie. It's up there with some of the Marx Brothers' better stuff, except the songs are wonderful instead of horrible.

ajr82
10-01-2009, 01:53 PM
Shivam should just listen to Past Masters, since it has some of their best songs and gives a sampling of all their work across their whole career.

shivam
10-01-2009, 02:08 PM
see, i'm just trying to figure out what it was that people listened to, what it was that they saw that caused mass hysteria and beatlemania.

taidan
10-01-2009, 02:19 PM
I think it was, in part, due to the happy, lovey dovey material in their old days being mixed with an often harder edge/dangerous lyrics.

ArugulaZ
10-01-2009, 02:41 PM
Glass Onion? You know, like the song? Aw, never mind.

Is it true that a young Phil Collins was in one of the Beatles movies?

ajr82
10-01-2009, 02:59 PM
see, i'm just trying to figure out what it was that people listened to, what it was that they saw that caused mass hysteria and beatlemania.

In that case you should definitely listen to Past Masters, since it has most of the early Beatlemania singles on it.

Pooch
10-01-2009, 03:18 PM
Is it true that a young Phil Collins was in one of the Beatles movies?

Yes, he's in the crowd during the "TV Special" performance at the end of A Hard Day's Night. Also, Phil supposedly plays congas on "The Art of Dying," on George's All Things Must Pass album.

As for Shivam's question...entire books have been written about why the Beatles impacted the way they did. The music has a large part to do with it, obviously, but it was more than that. Rock and roll back then was largely dead, and the Beatles offered something new and exciting; their entire image and personalities were fresh and vibrant, and the music was different from the Fabians and Frankie Avalons that were dominating the charts then. The Beatles Anthology (or some similar documentary) would be a good place to start if you want to get some answers to the "why" beyond just listening to "I Want to Hold Your Hand" or "She Loves You."

Posaune
10-01-2009, 03:45 PM
As it happens, I just watched the Simpsons where Ringo Starr gets around to reading Marge's fan letter and responds. He's so great in that - even though, according to the commentary, he was kind of annoyed at having been given a bunch more lines since they first approached him.

My favorite part is when he writes the letter back to Marge and writes "I hung it on me wall" and then it cuts to him looking at it and saying "Gear!".

Sheana
10-01-2009, 04:58 PM
A Hard Day's Night is a fantastic little movie. Clever and dryly witty, with really nicely done black & white film work as well. I remember reading somewhere that Joe Quesada watches the movie at least once a year because of the layouts and use of black & white and so on in the movie.

The music has a large part to do with it, obviously, but it was more than that. Rock and roll back then was largely dead, and the Beatles offered something new and exciting; their entire image and personalities were fresh and vibrant, and the music was different from the Fabians and Frankie Avalons that were dominating the charts then.

That's it exactly. The music and pop culture scene at the time was pretty dull, with safe boring songs, safe boring musicians, safe boring everything. A bunch of cheeky, clever guys from England with shaggy hair, big grins and amazing chemistry with each other and a take on music that wasn't the norm really startled people and made them take notice. It can be difficult to ponder decades later in retrospect, after everything's changed and is old news, but it can be argued that The Beatles created modern pop culture. And that's a helluva thing to do.

As simple and lowkey as the thing is, it's fun to listen to the innocent little nothing song Love Me Do and consider how music and the world will shortly never be the same. Even that tune has a slightly different energy and sound to it from the time period.

Tomm Guycot
10-01-2009, 06:47 PM
Sheana has it right.

When i listened to the Beatles last year - like really listened to them for the first time - I realized the reason I'd never "noticed" them before is because all my favorite bands were aping them (probably not consciously at all) 95% of the time. The Beatles shaped modern pop music (and rock and alternative, and anything springing from that base). The reason they don't sound "special" to you is because they created everything you already were listening to before you tried to figure out why they were special.

shivam
10-01-2009, 07:14 PM
yeah, i definately get that. they're a gaping hole in my music lore, and as a fan of music in general, this is unacceptable to me, so i'm making a determined effort to listen my way through their catalog, from the beginning.

Matchstick
10-01-2009, 08:51 PM
You probably saw this. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sgt._Pepper%27s_Lonely_Hearts_Club_Band_%28film%29 ) The songs are mostly drawn from Pepper and Abbey Road.

I saw that in the theater when it came out.

Azar
10-01-2009, 09:16 PM
I've Just Seen A Face is one of my Top Ten favorite Beatles songs of all time. I adore it greatly.
I've listened to a lot of Beatles in my life, but I've Just Seen a Face is one of those wonderful songs I always forget about because I don't listen to Help much. But it's just so, so good.

Sanagi
10-02-2009, 01:07 PM
see, i'm just trying to figure out what it was that people listened to, what it was that they saw that caused mass hysteria and beatlemania.
That's easy. They were the first boy band and the world was completely unprepared for it. Plus their songs were actually good.

Healy
10-02-2009, 03:24 PM
One thing I've noticed as I've been listening to the Beatles is that you can hear someone counting in the background on some of the songs. I know you can hear some in the middle of Birthday, and I think near the end of Polythene Pam, even though it's pretty faint. What's the purpose of it? Was it just to help with splicing takes together?

Animate Nihilist
10-02-2009, 03:35 PM
I acquired the 2009 remasters yesterday. It sounds fantastic. I have an original vinyl pressing of sgt peppers, and the 2009 remaster of sgt peppers sounds a lot more like the vinyl than the 1987 does. A+++ would listen again.

Edit: I can't stop listening to Within You Without You.

ArugulaZ
10-04-2009, 07:24 PM
I like Maxwell's Silver Hammer. It's funny, because three-quarters of the Beatles didn't. Even the easy-going Ringo Starr called it "fruity*," and there's a rumor that John Lennon mooned Paul McCartney as he was singing it (which is why he cracks up about halfway through it). I dunno, there's some cognitive dissonance in an upbeat song about a serial killer, but it's no worse than Mack the Knife, and heaps better than McCartney's rather dire '80s output.

* Which is funny coming from a guy who named himself after an apple, but I digress...

Sheana
10-04-2009, 09:40 PM
I should make a drinking game out of the jokes on this board about Ringo/apple. You japanerds.

Maxwell always weirded me out as a kid. A super-perky cheerful song about a remorseless serial killer? Interesting, Paul. Though that also reminds me, I finally noticed the Moog big-time on remastered Abbey Road. I never realized there was so much of it on Maxwell! Hell, I never realized they used it on multiple songs on Abbey Road! Who the hell was mixing albums for CD in the '80s, a room of monkeys chained to sound boards? I'm a lifelong Beatlemaniac and it's almost embarrasing how much stuff I'm finally noticing for the first time in the music.

taidan
10-04-2009, 10:01 PM
Maxwell is one of the few tunes I can't enjoy, though that's most likely to do with it reminding me of some bad points during my college years.

I think I need another listen to the White Album on the way to/from work tomorrow.

Sanagi
10-05-2009, 12:23 PM
I liked Maxwell's Silver Hammer the first time I heard it but each further listening has made it more tiresome. It's now the only track on Abbey Road that I skip every time, although I'm not too fond of Oh Darling either.

Posaune
10-05-2009, 02:41 PM
That's because you're not making the Little Richard-style "Hooo!" noises.

Sheana
10-05-2009, 03:04 PM
Paul is so gay for Little Richard, it's hilarious. I don't think he'll ever stop doing those hollers and shouts.

There's only two Beatles songs I ever skip over almost every single time: She's Leaving Home, because it hits my Weepy Girl button too damn hard, and The Long & Winding Road, because it is the sappiest of all possible sappy songs that Paul managed during The Beatles time period and because the Phil Spector orchestration on it is just too much.

The Abbey Road talk's given me an urge to listen to I Want You (She's So Heavy) on repeat. Not much in the way of lyrics, it's practically an instrumental, but it's a heck of a piece of music that's a lot darker and more intense than is usual for The Beatles.

It never stops being amazing how much they progressed as actual musicians from Love Me Do to The End. And they may have stopped touring, but the Rooftop Concert definitely showed they could do live at a moment's notice with next to no trouble. Major craftmanship goin' on there.

Posaune
10-05-2009, 04:38 PM
If I could play piano and sing, I'd be gay for Little Richard, too. Hooo!!

ArugulaZ
10-05-2009, 08:06 PM
Why have so few boy band members gone on to become legitimate recording artists? You've got Justin Timberlake doing his Michael Jackson 2.0 bit, and that's about the extent of it.