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View Full Version : Recipe Time!


dwolfe
11-11-2009, 02:40 PM
The whole 'brag what you've cooked' lately thread has inspired me. You guys seriously need to share recipes of things that turn out well. Pictures of the finished product are fine, but don't just post drool-worthy pictures without telling us how to cook along at home!

Dizzy
11-11-2009, 02:56 PM
My favorite quick snack:

Ingredients:


Corn (not on the cob)
Mayonnaise
Sour Cream
Pico Limon powder


Instructions:


Heat the corn. Heat it! But not too hot...
Put one or two spoonfuls of mayo* into the corn
Put one or two spoonfuls of sour cream* into the corn
Pour some Pico Limon powder on that
Mix it all up until it's one goopy mess
Eat it while reading Man Corn: Cannibalism and Violence in the Prehistoric American Southwest (http://www.amazon.com/Man-Corn-Cannibalism-Prehistoric-Southwest/dp/087480566X)


*depending on the size of the dish

Gwrrrk
11-11-2009, 03:19 PM
Hummus:

1 can chickpeas
2 cloves of garlic
2 or 3 tablespoons sesame oil (or tahini if you want it, really depends on how much you like the taste of sesame)
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp salt
Juice from half a lemon
Olive oil to blend
crackers or pita slices (for dipping, sho'nuff)

1. Throw everything into a blender or food processor save for the olive oil.

2. Keep adding olive oil a little bit at a time while processing until everything is pureed thoroughly.

3. Scoop the resulting luscious and delicious spread into the container of your choice and then hoard it, growling at anyone that comes near like the feral manbeast you are. How dare they try and sample this golden, taste-bud exciting homogeneous puree!

dwolfe
11-11-2009, 05:16 PM
I have never tried making hummus myself, but that's going to be this weekend's experiment, thanks!

Pombar
11-11-2009, 06:15 PM
Man, homemade hummus is bad friggin' ass. Love that stuff. I bought some supermarket stuff this week and it's all caramelised onioney. Blegh, sweet hummus. Should've just made my own.
Sorry? You thought I'd add something constructive to this thread? You were thinking of a different poster

nunix
11-11-2009, 06:20 PM
FALAFEL + BEEF BURRITO

some burrito/tortilla shells
some falafel (costco sells a good brand, a giant two-pack in large plastic boxes, or you can use homemade or whatever)
some strips of seasoned beef

STEP 1: cook beef until it is hot!
STEP 2: heat the falafel!
STEP 3: take some falafel and mash it into a pancake in the middle of the shell
STEP 4: put the beef on the falafel mini-pancake
STEP 5: roll that shell up
STEP 6: eat it!

very tasty, very filling!

Bongo Bill
11-11-2009, 09:35 PM
DELICIOUS SAUCE FOR MEATBALLS:
1 part ketchup
1 part grape jelly
1 dash cinnamon

ALTERNATE DELICIOUS SAUCE FOR MEATBALLS:
1 part chili sauce
1 part cranberry sauce

Red Hedgehog
11-12-2009, 10:20 AM
Here is how easy corn bread is. Pretty sure I originally got the recipe from Joy of Cooking and modified it a bit:

Vegetable Oil - 1/2 cup
Milk - 2 cups
Eggs - 2 whole or 4 whites
Baking Powder - 4 tsp
Sugar - 1 cup
Corn Meal (I think white corn meal is best) - 1 1/2 cups
Flour - 2 1/2 cups
Vanilla - Lots (Seriously, I use like half the small bottle)

This is for a 13x9 pan. Half the recipe for a 9x9 pan

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Grease pan. Mix dry ingredients together. Gradually stir in all other ingredients. Pour into pan and bake 20-25 minutes or until light golden brown and a toothpick dipped in comes out clean.

Marfy
11-12-2009, 01:14 PM
Cornbread.


Ooh. I may use this recipe for the Thanksgiving dinner we're trying to throw together here. I usually make vegan cornbread, but left my copy of Vegan with a Vengeance (http://theppk.com/) in the States. It's slightly fluffier and lighter than regular cornbread.

Mm. Cornbread.

Sheana
11-12-2009, 03:52 PM
Leniwe Pierogi (Lazy Pierogi)

1-2 7.5 oz. packages of Farmer Cheese (preferably Friendship brand)
1 Egg
Flour
Salt

Note: There are few specific measurements with this recipe, as it's one of those family recipe things where you just throw stuff together until it looks & feels right.

Note 2: If you want to make larger quantities, add another egg for every two packages of farmer cheese you use.

1. Mix the farmer cheese, egg and a pinch of salt together with a fork until evenly blended (you don't want it too smooth). Add some flour bit by bit and mix it in until it starts to stay firmly together. Vary the amount of flour depending on how cheesey or more solid/traditionally noodle-y you want 'em.

2. Without kneading and getting too much into it, roll the mixture out on a floured surface until there's no more sticky parts and the dough's a little more firm. Seperate out into several chunks, and roll each chunk out into a long rope. Keep the surface plenty floured to make sure nothing breaks and sticks.

3. Cut the ropes into small diagonal pieces, about an inch wide or so, and dump them in a pot of boiling water. If the water's boiling too hard, it'll break up the noodles, so watch it. When the noodles have been floating at the top of the boiling pot for about a minute or so they're done and ready to eat!

One package of farmer cheese is good for two servings, so up the amounts accordingly. You can have these cheese noodles sweet or savory, however you like it! They're a good side to all sorts of meals. My family tends to eat them by themselves as a special treat, buttered with a liberal amount of sugar sprinkled on top. You can also save 'em up for later and gently fry them in a pan. The way to a Pole's heart: farmer cheese and plenty of it.

Gwrrrk
11-13-2009, 06:36 AM
sorry, what exactly is farmers cheese? I'm picturing some sort of soft cheese like ricotta or cottage cheese.

Sheana
11-13-2009, 01:42 PM
Yeah, that's basically what it is, a dry, packed cottage cheese. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farmer_cheese)

http://www.gastronomonline.com/image?base=shopcard&id=95&width=200&height=200

Marfy
11-22-2009, 07:45 AM
Here is how easy corn bread is. Pretty sure I originally got the recipe from Joy of Cooking and modified it a bit:

Vegetable Oil - 1/2 cup
Milk - 2 cups
Eggs - 2 whole or 4 whites
Baking Powder - 4 tsp
Sugar - 1 cup
Corn Meal (I think white corn meal is best) - 1 1/2 cups
Flour - 2 1/2 cups
Vanilla - Lots (Seriously, I use like half the small bottle)

This is for a 13x9 pan. Half the recipe for a 9x9 pan

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Grease pan. Mix dry ingredients together. Gradually stir in all other ingredients. Pour into pan and bake 20-25 minutes or until light golden brown and a toothpick dipped in comes out clean.

So. I just made some of this, and my taste tester roommates & I think it needs salt. How much would be appropriate to add? I was thinking a tablespoon? Though, I really like salt, and am probably not the best judge. Also I don't know anything about cooking.

Dadgum Roi
11-22-2009, 09:47 AM
Sugar and vanilla in cornbread DO WUT

Cornbread needs lard.

dwolfe
11-22-2009, 01:50 PM
So. I just made some of this, and my taste tester roommates & I think it needs salt. How much would be appropriate to add? I was thinking a tablespoon? Though, I really like salt, and am probably not the best judge. Also I don't know anything about cooking.

Oh god not a Tablespoon. Try a teaspoon, since you love salt. Salt makes everything better, but only when you can't taste it.

If you can taste the salt, you should be eating bacon instead :)

Red Hedgehog
11-22-2009, 08:43 PM
So. I just made some of this, and my taste tester roommates & I think it needs salt. How much would be appropriate to add? I was thinking a tablespoon? Though, I really like salt, and am probably not the best judge. Also I don't know anything about cooking.

It's much worse to have too much salt than not enough. I'd start with a teaspoon. I usually just have the cornbread with salted butter.

Lady
11-22-2009, 11:08 PM
Delicious White Cocoa:

two parts milk (12oz)
one part water (6oz)
one swiss miss packet (for six ounces)
[at least] 4 spoons of french vanilla coffee mix stuff (for six ounces also!?)

it doesn't add up mathematically, but it tastes alright

Sheana
11-26-2009, 12:23 AM
Oh hey! Holiday time is baking time, so I thought I'd share one of my absolute favorites: my family's recipe for Banana Cake/Cupcakes.


Molloy Family Banana Cupcakes


1/4 cup "sour" milk
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (about 3)
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup Crisco
2 eggs
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
2 cups flour
1 tsp. vanilla

* To make the sour milk, just add 1 Tbsp. of lemon juice to milk and let it curdle a bit.

* By ripe bananas I'm talkin' the absolute ripest, solid dark-brown skin with innards that are practically ooze. Even better if the bananas were frozen and thawed out, makes for more liquid and moister cupcakes!

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
2. Cream sugar and Crisco together.
3. Add eggs and vanilla, beat until fluffy.
4. Combine flour, baking soda & salt together in a seperate bowl.
5. Beat the flour mixture into the main batter in small amounts, alternating with similar small amounts of the sour milk and banana. Make sure the banana is well incorporated, you don't want chunks.
6. Pour into cupcake holders or a greased 9 x 13 pan and bake! 20-25 minutes for cupcakes, 40-45 minutes for the sheet cake.

We rarely go the pan route, we're all about the banana cupcakes in this family and I think it's better suited to it as well.

To be honest I don't really like actual bananas very much, but I adore these banana cupcakes and could eat them forever and never stop. They're great with vanilla frosting or whatever you want on top, but often we just eat them plain, muffin-style. It's that good a recipe!

Note: these cupcakes are moist as hell, especially if you use defrosted bananas with extra juice. Putting them in airtight containers fairly quickly makes the tops turn super sticky and gooey, and within a day or two sugar will start to crystallize on the dang things. I actually like them best like this, but some people may not so just a word of warnin'.

NevznachaY
01-14-2010, 07:10 AM
Easiest dessert ever.

Take Drambouie (although port wine will do as well). Mix it with mascarpone thoroughly. Add cookie crumbs.

YUM

Marfy
02-01-2010, 02:20 PM
Does anyone have any tips for making vegetable stock/broth? What veggies work well? How much water should I add in proportion to the vegetables? I do not have a stock pot of any sort, just my handy medium sized saucepan, and any recipe out there would make too much for just little ol' me. I plan on freezing it, but still.

upupdowndown
02-01-2010, 02:21 PM
Lamb Turnovers
Makes 36 large turnovers

You’ll need:

1 lb ground lamb
3 tablespoons butter
8 oz goat cheese
Golden raisins
Pine nuts
½ Vidalia onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
Fresh rosemary – three long stems
Salt
Fresh ground pepper
Honey
Two boxes of puff pastry frozen sheets, two sheets in each box.

1) Take out the puff pastry sheets and lay them out flat to thaw. The box says that they take about 40 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In the meantime, you can prepare the filling and glaze.
2) In a large pan, melt one and a half tablespoons of butter over medium low heat. Begin gently sautéing the chopped onion half. The goal here is to caramelize the onions, so keep it low and slow!
3) While the onions are caramelizing, go ahead and strip the rosemary leaves off of their stems, and chop the leaves.
4) The onions are still caramelizing, so let’s make the glaze for the turnovers. Melt the remaining butter in your smallest saucepan on medium low heat, then throw in about a tablespoon or more of honey, a quarter of the chopped rosemary leaves, and salt and fresh ground pepper to taste. Stir and let simmer together, then turn off heat. End result should taste rich, a little sweet, a little peppery, and very much like rosemary. Add more butter or honey if needed.
5) Near the end of the onions cooking down, thrown in the minced garlic. After a minute or two, put the ground lamb in and turn the heat up to medium. Sautee. Once the lamb starts to lose its pinkness, throw in the rosemary and a couple handfuls of pine nuts and golden raisins. Keep sautéing until lamb is nearly fully cooked through – now quickly add a tablespoon of honey, and salt and fresh ground pepper to taste. (Adding salt earlier will toughen the meat.)
6) Remove the lamb mixture from the pan and put into a bowl. The lamb will have given off a LOT of fat as it sautéed – make sure that you’ve drained the mixture!
7) At this point, the puff pastry should be ready to work with. Lay one sheet on a lightly floured work surface. With a floured rolling pin, roll the sheet both horizontally and vertically several times. You’re just rolling it so that it extends an inch or two more in each direction.
8) Cut the sheet up into nine even squares. Place a bit of goat cheese in the center of each square, then some of the lamb filling. Fold the squares into triangles and pinch shut the seams with your fingers, then flute the edges by pressing the tines of a fork down on them.
9) Repeat with the remaining three sheets of puff pastry.
10) Put the turnovers on baking sheets. You might try spraying some Pam for baking on the baking sheets first. Take the glaze you’ve made and brush the turnovers. Put into the oven at 400 for 14 minutes initially, then check the turnovers. They are done when the tops are a golden brown, so keep baking them until they reach that point.
11) Cool turnovers on wire racks, then enjoy!

Pajaro Pete
02-01-2010, 08:49 PM
Does anyone have any tips for making vegetable stock/broth? What veggies work well? How much water should I add in proportion to the vegetables? I do not have a stock pot of any sort, just my handy medium sized saucepan, and any recipe out there would make too much for just little ol' me. I plan on freezing it, but still.

In its most basic form, you just need carrots, onions and celery. This should help you. (http://allrecipes.com/howto/making-vegetable-stock/detail.aspx) And if you want to get really fancy, you can kick it up a notch like BAM! (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/vegetable-stock-recipe/index.html)

Marfy
02-02-2010, 03:34 AM
Thanks Giada! I'm so honored to have a professional cook like you answer my questions!

ThornGhost
02-02-2010, 01:32 PM
A couple of years ago, I was driving up Interstate 81 in the middle of a long trip when I suddenly had the craving for spaghetti burgers. Not certain that such a thing actually existed, I went home later and knocked something up like what I was wanting. I really enjoy them (from time to time) and I'd like to share.
This is all a bit slap dash, it comes out a little differently each time. Modify things as you see fit.

Aaron's Spaghetti Burgers

Ingredients:
Ground beef (enough for as many patties as you'd like)
1 package angel hair pasta
1 bag shredded mozzarella cheese
2 eggs
1 jar sliced mushrooms
1 jar spaghetti sauce
1 can cooking spray
hamburger buns
garlic butter spread
Italian seasoning

Preheat your oven to around 350 degrees. Get some water boiling.

When the water is boiling, cook the angel hair pasta as normal. When it is ready to eat, strain it and put it in a cooking spray'd casserole dish. Mix in the whites from your eggs and the mozzarella cheese to taste. Pop it in the oven and cook for around 15 minutes. Check on it from time to time and try to avoid a burnt or overly crisp top.

Put your ground beef in a bowl and mix in the sliced mushrooms and Italian seasonings. Form some patties for the burgers out of the mix and either fry or cook them on the grill. Some of the mushrooms will likely fall of at this part, that's okay.

Spread the garlic butter spread on the insides of the hamburger buns and pop them in the oven to toast.

Heat up the spaghetti sauce on the stove or in a bowl in the microwave.

When the pasta is done cooking, cut into squares the same size as your patties. Put a patty and pasta square on each bun buttom and drizzle spaghetti sauce on top of the patties. Then cap with the bun top.

Voila, spaghetti burgers! They're kind of mushy, but so so good.