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View Full Version : Hot/Spicy Food Time--Yay or Nay


cortbassist89
01-12-2010, 03:48 PM
I like spicy foods. Kinda. The first and only time I had Indian food, I really enjoyed the flavor, but the heat and spice killed it for me. I'm not very heat tolerant, even despite my Mexican heritage, so it destroyed my body, and my mouth was burning for hours.

So herein we discuss all foodstuffs hot and spicy.

Pajaro Pete
01-12-2010, 03:53 PM
Spicy Food is the Best Food. Anyone who doesn't like Spicy Food is a terrible human being.

Alixsar
01-12-2010, 03:53 PM
Spicy food is the best food. I put hot sauce on everything. On every thing. All things.

Edit: DAMN IT TURNIP

Dawnswalker
01-12-2010, 03:55 PM
I like spicy foods, but I also really like beer to wash the BURNING out of my mouth afterward.

I don't think I've ever actually eaten anything that one would consider to have hardcore amounts of spicyness.

Lumber Baron
01-12-2010, 03:55 PM
I enjoy spicy foods. There is no food I have eaten that was too spicy for me. However, at the point where food is advertised as "SO HOT YOU WOULD KILL YOUR CHILDREN FOR WATER!" it stops being that tasty.

So please, invite me over to finish your order of Ass-Blasting-Nuclear-Fission-Death-Metal chicken wings. I could use the calories.

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 03:56 PM
I have cajun roots so I love it! Please don't believe the stereotype that all cajun food is insanely spicy, real cajun food just has lots of seasoning.

Pseudonym
01-12-2010, 03:56 PM
Spicy! I like hot foods! But not so hot as to obscure the rest of the flavors. I need to be able to still experience salty, sour, buttery, and other lovely tastes! But I still love the kick of hot spices!

Great hot stuff:
A real andouille sausage in red beans and rice!
Hot wings!
Hot pepper jelly!
And on the cheap, I like to put copious Cayenne pepper in my chicken ramen noodles.

Milk is the cooling drink of choice at home. Away, I take a Margarita!

Falselogic
01-12-2010, 04:10 PM
I like spicy foods. Kinda. The first and only time I had Indian food, I really enjoyed the flavor, but the heat and spice killed it for me. I'm not very heat tolerant, even despite my Mexican heritage, so it destroyed my body, and my mouth was burning for hours.

So herein we discuss all foodstuffs hot and spicy.

You should steer away from authentic Thai food then

Spicy is the way to go, just about anything can be improved by adding chili peppers to it.

VorpalEdge
01-12-2010, 04:10 PM
I have by far the lowest tolerance for spicy foods out of everyone I've ever met. The hottest things I can take are Subway's banana peppers, which amuses me greatly. So yeah, keep this stuff away from me, please.

(and, in a semi-related note, I can't drink carbonated beverages because my tongue feels like it's exploding if I take more than a sip at a time. It's literally one step down from genuine pain, and it makes me nauseous to compensate for not being quite there. so much for beer, I guess)

Dizzy
01-12-2010, 04:11 PM
Next TT meet-up: spicy food contest. First round: Texas bell pepper.

DemoWeasel
01-12-2010, 04:18 PM
Because I come from a Hispanic family, nearly every food that is cooked in the house is some variation of spicy (typically SUPER HOT).

Dadgum Roi
01-12-2010, 04:25 PM
I love spicy food. My current favorite is a torta de huevo from a tiny Mexican place out in the country.

mopinks
01-12-2010, 04:34 PM
my greatest regret is that I was already in my 20s by the time I discovered Indian food. all those wasted years!!

estragon
01-12-2010, 05:21 PM
When I went to Thailand for two weeks over the year end/new year season, it was primarily to eat lots of curry.

Which I did. And it was amazing.

Does anyone else make their spaghetti spicy? I really like to add red pepper to generic tomato-and-meat-sauce spaghetti, but only when I am eating alone, because I know that a lot of people are disturbed by this concept.

Dadgum Roi
01-12-2010, 05:25 PM
Does anyone else make their spaghetti spicy? I really like to add red pepper to generic tomato-and-meat-sauce spaghetti, but only when I am eating alone, because I know that a lot of people are disturbed by this concept.

I do this with red pepper, too. I buy huge bottles of red pepper from Sam's Club because I burn through the stuff like crazy. A lot of traditional recipes from this area call for it.

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 05:27 PM
Spicy potatoe and sausage stew is one of the best tasting things I ever ate.

Kishi
01-12-2010, 05:37 PM
I have by far the lowest tolerance for spicy foods out of everyone I've ever met. The hottest things I can take are Subway's banana peppers, which amuses me greatly. So yeah, keep this stuff away from me, please.

My tolerance is probably just a bit higher than this. Somehow, though, I adore curry anyway.

Pajaro Pete
01-12-2010, 05:48 PM
I put cumin in my eggs.

Eirikr
01-12-2010, 05:52 PM
Mmmmmm, Old Bay. Which isn't all that spicy, but enough of it and your eyes'll water.

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 05:54 PM
How to make catsup better.

Step one, put hot sauce into catsup.

Step two, mix vigorously.

Step three, liberally apply to tongue.

PERFECT! Even better then mama!

shivam
01-12-2010, 06:04 PM
there is nonspicy food? i...i dont understand.

Alixsar
01-12-2010, 06:06 PM
Don't worry Shivam, it sucks.

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 06:11 PM
there is nonspicy food? i...i dont understand.

Not everyone was blessed with our tastes, about 30% percent of the population doesn't like spicy food, so they feebly tryed to make edible food without spice, but they mostly failed. the only good[B] food that they made that is [B]not improved with spice is chocolate milk.

Pajaro Pete
01-12-2010, 06:16 PM
there is nonspicy food? i...i dont understand.

There are people who add Campbell's Condensed Creme of Mushroom Soup to what they're making for flavor.

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 06:19 PM
There are people who add Campbell's Condensed Creme of Mushroom Soup to what they're making for flavor.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e200/grokyou/porfavorno.gif

cortbassist89
01-12-2010, 06:23 PM
There are people who add Campbell's Condensed Creme of Mushroom Soup to what they're making for flavor.

My family does that!

...wait...

Oh dear god nooooo

shivam
01-12-2010, 06:30 PM
so i just ate a bi chay vietnamese sandwich. basically, a baguette sliced in half, slathered with viet mayo, and topped with shredded carrots, deep fried soy things, cilantro, and thinly sliced chili peppers. my mouth is burning soo goood right now.

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 06:39 PM
My family does that!

...wait...

Oh dear god nooooo

http://celestialkitsune.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/whygodwhy-yotsuba.jpg

Kishi
01-12-2010, 06:54 PM
A couple weeks ago, I went to a Thai place and got one of the curry dishes, set to the lowest spiciness. It still killed me inside, despite being so delicious; I'm used to that, but I think I worried the people who were with me.

"Are you going to be okay?"

"Don't I look like I'm going to be okay?"

"...No!"

demonkoala
01-12-2010, 06:56 PM
I like ridiculously spicy food, but I also enjoy the complete polar flavors. Such as Japanese food.

shivam
01-12-2010, 07:05 PM
in japan, next to my apartment was a small japanese run indian restaurant. they served generic curry, and the best garlic naan i've ever had. Their spice levels were 1-4, with 4 being labeled "Indojin mo bikkurishita", meaning that even indians will be surprised.

well now. I wasn't about to let that kind of statement pass. In my arrogance, i ordered it. Now, normally, japanese curry is a deep brown. this shit? this was as red as a cooked lobster. And lord jesus did it burn like the fires! turns out they were right. even indians were surprised.

the next day, i learned the error of my ways, and after a lengthy ordeal, i ordered only spicy 2 from then on.

Sheana
01-12-2010, 07:28 PM
Moderate spice can be nice now and then, but I've got, like, no hot & spicy threshold whatsoever, so it doesn't take much to kill my tongue. I prefer actually being able to taste what I'm eating.

shivam
01-12-2010, 07:36 PM
thats what my wife is like. we have very strong discussions about food and flavor like every night.

Merus
01-12-2010, 07:46 PM
in japan, next to my apartment was a small japanese run indian restaurant. they served generic curry, and the best garlic naan i've ever had. Their spice levels were 1-4, with 4 being labeled "Indojin mo bikkurishita", meaning that even indians will be surprised.

well now. I wasn't about to let that kind of statement pass. In my arrogance, i ordered it. Now, normally, japanese curry is a deep brown. this shit? this was as red as a cooked lobster. And lord jesus did it burn like the fires! turns out they were right. even indians were surprised.

the next day, i learned the error of my ways, and after a lengthy ordeal, i ordered only spicy 2 from then on.
This is the best story.

Kishi
01-12-2010, 07:49 PM
The Indojin's burden is great.

dwolfe
01-12-2010, 08:12 PM
I love spicy food, but only if you can taste the food above the hot.

I wish I could have curry with all you guys.

tungwene
01-12-2010, 08:24 PM
I can't for the life of me eat spicy food. It causes great physical pain.

Brickroad
01-12-2010, 08:26 PM
I wanted to vote both "I respect..." and "keep it away!"

Peanut made some jalapeno salsa one night. I swear to god I didn't taste anything for weeks after that.

Matchstick
01-12-2010, 08:33 PM
I love spicy food, but only if you can taste the food above the hot.

That's the way I look at it, too. Hot just to be hot without flavor is pointless. I once went to a local Thai place and when I asked for it full-on, they tried to dissuade me. I said, "No, no, I really do want it hot." When it came out, it was awesome. They came by in the middle looking to see if I'd passed out. When I said I loved it, they said, "Now you can go to Thailand!"

Dadgum Roi
01-12-2010, 09:22 PM
Usually you lose complexity by ramping down the spiciness.

spineshark
01-12-2010, 09:31 PM
I like to burn myself. I don't go for too-spicy sauces or ingredients though-I prefer to take something pretty spicy and use lots of it. For some reason though I don't like the taste of jalapenos, and I'll only eat them if they've already been cooked into something.

But yeah, if I'm at any kind of Asian restaurant and my nose isn't running, something is wrong.

Kishi
01-12-2010, 09:36 PM
I always think of that close-up of Kamon (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxcTQDIURuQ) when that happens.

mopinks
01-12-2010, 09:45 PM
I had a BIGASS bowl of spicy miso ramen in Japantown on Saturday! I wish I could have a BIGASS bowl of spicy miso ramen every day.

I also wish the ramen shop would give me one of those beautiful half-boiled eggs instead of just tossing half of a hard boiled egg into the bowl, but what can you do? I'm willing to let it slide because I am too busy slurping down amazing spicy broth.

Balrog
01-12-2010, 10:11 PM
Wendy's has spicy nuggets right now, guys. Just sayin'.

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 10:31 PM
I just tried the spicy chicken nuggets, they had a hint of heat but they don't taste as good as the normal nuggets, so I say put hot sauce on the regular nuggets.

redstuff
01-13-2010, 01:00 AM
I can enjoy some mildly spicy stuff but outside of that no. Eating here can be tough sometimes because spiciness is just so prevalent.

Red Hedgehog
01-13-2010, 01:20 AM
I like spicy foods, but I also really like beer to wash the BURNING out of my mouth afterward.

Beer has the exact opposite effect on me. Carbonation plus spice just makes my mouth feel like it's dissolving itself. Incredibly unpleasant. Besides, a fat-based beverage is best to cut the spice. Like milk. Or Mango Lassi. Mmm...

Brickroad
01-13-2010, 01:53 AM
If I'm eating something spicy I must have a glass of milk on standby. I had two full glasses earlier tonight to take the edge off the not-quite-a-whole-bowl of chili I ate.

Stiv
01-13-2010, 01:58 AM
Spicy-sweet is where it's at, guys. I make a mean mango salsa and that shit is truly excellent! Chili, too. The secret ingredient is... lots of hot peppers.

I love spicy food to hell and back, having southwestern roots. It helped me branch out into cuisines that my family was never exactly comfortable with, like thai and indian.

Gredlen
01-13-2010, 02:02 AM
Spicy food is the best food.

Chu
01-13-2010, 02:04 AM
I can enjoy some mildly spicy stuff but outside of that no.

Same here. You guys can enjoy it all you want, and that's great, but I don't enjoy the pain. Sorry guys. :\

NevznachaY
01-13-2010, 09:20 AM
Interesting debate: tolerance for spiciness - genetic or behavioristic?

Silent Noise
01-13-2010, 09:56 AM
If I'm eating something spicy I must have a glass of milk on standby. I had two full glasses earlier tonight to take the edge off the not-quite-a-whole-bowl of chili I ate.

Ice Cream has always worked better for me then milk, the same with bread with butter.

demonkoala
01-13-2010, 10:34 AM
in japan, next to my apartment was a small japanese run indian restaurant. they served generic curry, and the best garlic naan i've ever had. Their spice levels were 1-4, with 4 being labeled "Indojin mo bikkurishita", meaning that even indians will be surprised.

well now. I wasn't about to let that kind of statement pass. In my arrogance, i ordered it. Now, normally, japanese curry is a deep brown. this shit? this was as red as a cooked lobster. And lord jesus did it burn like the fires! turns out they were right. even indians were surprised.

the next day, i learned the error of my ways, and after a lengthy ordeal, i ordered only spicy 2 from then on.
People don't realize how spicy Indian food can get. I get some tough guys saying Indian food isn't spicy. I look at them funny and just say "...in America..." and tell them to go to India, don't pass go and don't collect $200.

I wanted to vote both "I respect..." and "keep it away!"

Peanut made some jalapeno salsa one night. I swear to god I didn't taste anything for weeks after that.
PUSSY. Sorry, don't know why I decided to call you out...

Ethan
01-13-2010, 10:38 AM
I like spicy food and have a decent tolerance of it (can't eat a raw japapeņo, but I can handle most Indian-style heat), but I don't introduce heat to a food that shouldn't have it. Putting it on everything kind of misses the point, I feel.

pence
01-13-2010, 10:41 AM
I like my scovilles, but once I got way too arrogant adding crushed red pepper to hamburgers I was making. The juices ran red even though it was cooked through, and I paid for it the next day. I also used to eat hot salsa. Now I stick with the medium kind, and try to exercise restraint.

Also ask comb stranger about putting wasabi on sugar cookies and keeping a jar of Da Bomb (http://www.insanechicken.com/Da_Bomb_hot_sauce/) in the fridge for years as a conversation piece.

demonkoala
01-13-2010, 10:48 AM
Also ask comb stranger about putting wasabi on sugar cookies and keeping a jar of Da Bomb (http://www.insanechicken.com/Da_Bomb_hot_sauce/) in the fridge for years as a conversation piece.

I tried "The Source" by that same maker. Notice that price tag. That sauce isn't joking. It was given to me on a toothpick and it numbed my mouth.

Zef
01-13-2010, 10:49 AM
I'm probably the only living specimen of Mexican who hates chile and is befuddled anyone would want to suffer while eating. Well, I only hate most varieties, anyway. The sweet kinds are OK.

I blame rajas, a special method of preparation, for my current condition.

I... had a situation with them when I was four. My parents say I was never the same after that.

Silent Noise
01-13-2010, 10:49 AM
Man you guys I just remembered that when I was 2 I would steal any and all salsa that I could get so eventually my parents just gave me spoonfuls of salsa at age 2.

Would that make me how you say metal?

VorpalEdge
01-13-2010, 12:35 PM
Interesting debate: tolerance for spiciness - genetic or behavioristic?

Both. A genetic component exists (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supertaster), and some of it pretty much has to be behavioral like any other human activity.

DemoWeasel
01-13-2010, 04:06 PM
Would that make me how you say metal?

Nah.

Silent Noise
01-13-2010, 04:16 PM
Nah.

Pooh. I really don't know what the term means so I was mostly joking.

Tomm Guycot
01-13-2010, 04:35 PM
I generally avoid spicy food however can enjoy a degree of it.

If something is spicy as part of a FLAVOR then I can deal with it if it's tasty, even if it's really hot. When given the choice though I hover around mild to enjoy the flavor without the spice.

Those stupid sauces that are made to just be AS SPICY AS POSSIBLE don't have any flavor. they're just there to chemically burn your mouth. That's stupid. I wouldn't eat those.

TIP: If you're in the UK, "spicy" doesn't mean "hot" it means "seasoned." So Spicy away.

Phantoon
01-13-2010, 04:48 PM
I don't like it so hot that you can't taste the other ingredients but a sweaty forehead never hurt anybody.

Zef
01-13-2010, 05:05 PM
My friends and family find it odd that, while I steer very, very clear of chile, I really like eating wasabi by the spoonful, all by itself (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2W-Jh4EKmk).

The difference is, chile stays in your tongue and massacres your digestive tract. You win nothing from consuming it! On the other hand, wasabi is like napalm for your olfactory tract, leaving your sinuses clear and fresh after the eye-watering pain.

Red Hedgehog
01-13-2010, 05:44 PM
My friends and family find it odd that, while I steer very, very clear of chile, I really like eating wasabi by the spoonful, all by itself (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2W-Jh4EKmk).

The difference is, chile stays in your tongue and massacres your digestive tract. You win nothing from consuming it! On the other hand, wasabi is like napalm for your olfactory tract, leaving your sinuses clear and fresh after the eye-watering pain.

Right. They're different sorts of spiciness. One of my funniest memories was going to lunch at a Japanese place with a bunch of Indians. Their reactions when they first tried wasabi were hilarious - here are guys that don't blink at the amount of chili pepper in something but they just started going crazy and making faces and freaking out at a taste of wasabi.

ravinoff
01-13-2010, 06:13 PM
One time a roommate and I (mildly) pepper sprayed the kitchen making hot sauce.

We were making sauce from fresh habaneros, jalapeņos, and two kinds of dried peppers that I forget (plus vinegar and spices). We had reconstituted the dried peppers and were blending them and the fresh with a food processor.

A third roommate walked into the kitchen, stopped as if someone has physically struck him, cursed a couple times, and retreated. It was a fairly habanero heavy sauce.

We shrugged and continued making hot sauce, our eyes were burning too, but hot sauce is worth it.

figcube
01-13-2010, 07:27 PM
I only eat chili my mom makes for meats that she's cooking. I never eat anything spicy besides that. Though there was this one time when visiting my Dad, the jerk tricks me into eating a really hot chili pepper. I take one bite and I'm running around the house like an idiot trying to grab anything to cool me down. First drink some milk, then some water, then I brush my mouth, then I suck on an ice cube and my mouth still tingled after that. Worst part is he made a bet with me for only five bucks so I thought I could do it because it was a low amount of money he was risking.

Silent Noise
01-13-2010, 07:58 PM
Water only makes the buring worse, apples and apple juice are among the best heat killers.

Zef
01-13-2010, 11:07 PM
Water only makes the buring worse, apples and apple juice are among the best heat killers.

Bread is the ultimate solution. NOT WHITE BREAD! Whole grain. The consistency is better.

There was also a Mythbusters where they tested the various folk cures. IIRC, water was the control; they tested milk (thumbs up,) soda (made it worse,) toothpaste (the heck!?) and wasabi.

The last one worked by virtue of making you forget the fire in your mouth by moving the pain upstairs. But it did work!

Red Hedgehog
01-13-2010, 11:40 PM
The science behind it is that the spicy stuff in chili peppers is fat-soluble, not water-soluble. So you ideally want something with a good amount of fat to move it/break it down. Hence why milk works.

Torgo
01-14-2010, 07:57 PM
I don't mind a little heat in small doses. The hottest thing I ever ate was probably a chicken wing last semester. It was intended for an eating context, and was spiced with a shitload of habenaro and heaven only knows what else. Chef told me in his low, booming voice, "I warn you this is very hot."

My face was red and my mouth numb for probably two hours and it spent the next several beyond that murdering my digestive system. I wanted to complain about it, but when a cute girl I know was talking about how great the wings were, I couldn't find it in myself to whine like a pussy.

I was better off then my friend however, who made the mistake of touching his eyes after eating one.

Silent Noise
01-14-2010, 08:09 PM
Yeah, never touch your eyes or the inside of your nose after handling spicy things. Trust me on this.

cortbassist89
01-14-2010, 08:14 PM
But do touch your friend's eyes. It will be funny.

So long as you can run faster than them.

Pajaro Pete
01-16-2010, 01:00 AM
in japan, next to my apartment was a small japanese run indian restaurant. they served generic curry, and the best garlic naan i've ever had. Their spice levels were 1-4, with 4 being labeled "Indojin mo bikkurishita", meaning that even indians will be surprised.

well now. I wasn't about to let that kind of statement pass. In my arrogance, i ordered it. Now, normally, japanese curry is a deep brown. this shit? this was as red as a cooked lobster. And lord jesus did it burn like the fires! turns out they were right. even indians were surprised.

You should have washed it down with delicious Curry Ramune!
http://i707.photobucket.com/albums/ww76/friedturnips/curry_ramune.jpg

Merus
01-16-2010, 04:45 AM
But do touch your friend's eyes. It will be funny.

So long as you can run faster than them.

The advantage is that they probably won't be able to see.

Daikaiju
01-16-2010, 10:38 AM
In my mind there's three distinct types of spice burn;
Flash fire: Horseradish and wasabi. Intense burst that fades fast.
Smoldering start: Peppercorns. These will sneak up, usually from the back of your throat and can linger. Also itches a little if overused.
Arson: Chile peppers. You burn now and burn long. Strength varies according to doseage and variety

I'm definitly in the flavor over fever camp. Hottest thing i can stand is regular Tabasco. I like their milder sauces, the chipolte and the green jalepeno as well as the garlic. Also I enjoy the sweetness of horseradish and it's green cousin, wasabi. Pepper is a nice way to perk up a dish without running roughshod over flavor.

dangerhelvetica
01-16-2010, 11:19 AM
We've got sauce! Barbecue sauce! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Fm7Dkc5Ag)

Dizzy
02-09-2010, 03:54 AM
That's the way I look at it, too. Hot just to be hot without flavor is pointless. I once went to a local Thai place and when I asked for it full-on, they tried to dissuade me. I said, "No, no, I really do want it hot." When it came out, it was awesome. They came by in the middle looking to see if I'd passed out. When I said I loved it, they said, "Now you can go to Thailand!"

I don't why I learned this essential lesson eating Thai food and not Mexican food.