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View Full Version : Healthy Food That Doesn't Taste Terrible But Doesn't Sacrifice Nutrition for Flavor


onimaruxlr
01-12-2010, 04:14 PM
DOES IT EXIST?

People keep telling me to put salad dressing or salt or cheese or buffalo wings on my salad, and as appealing as that idea is, at that point it's like "Why bother with the salad?"

Dizzy
01-12-2010, 04:15 PM
Supposedly there is a substance out there that is sweeter than sugar and is good for diabetics. I forget its name...

Salad dressing kind of defeats the purpose of eating salad if you're trying to be a freak, doesn't it?

Silent Noise
01-12-2010, 04:15 PM
Hummus says hi.

Parish
01-12-2010, 04:21 PM
Supposedly there is a substance out there that is sweeter than sugar and is good for diabetics. I forget its name...
Do you mean stevia?

SilentSnake
01-12-2010, 04:21 PM
Supposedly there is a substance out there that is sweeter than sugar and is good for diabetics. I forget its name...

Aspartame is the word you're looking for.

Dizzy
01-12-2010, 04:22 PM
I think so, guys. I saw some fitness model promote it on a talking show and my feelers twitched.

It supposedly has no caloric value, too.

Lumber Baron
01-12-2010, 04:32 PM
I'm very impressed by quinoa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinoa) as a protein source. Really hearty and not lacking in taste. It goes great with a British/Japanese curry sauce.

Falselogic
01-12-2010, 04:36 PM
Things like Spinach, Chard and Kale and other leafy green things are chock full of good things... if you dont cook them. Sadly they taste terribly if you dont...

There are a number of foods that burn more calories to digest then you get from eating them!

Here is a list:

Celery
Oranges
Strawberries
Tangerines
Grapefruit
Carrots
Apricots
Lettuce
Tomatoes
Cucumbers
Watermelon
Cauliflower
Apples
Hot Chili Peppers
Zucchini

All of those are awesome delicious foods.. be careful about Celery though it has a carcinogen in it!

mopinks
01-12-2010, 04:41 PM
I love raw spinach. I will shove handfuls of it into my mouth as though it were potato chips.

it is king among leafy greens.

Dadgum Roi
01-12-2010, 04:45 PM
Things like Spinach, Chard and Kale and other leafy green things are chock full of good things... if you dont cook them. Sadly they taste terribly if you dont...

Just boil/braise them and serve them in the pot liquor. And add collards to the above. Cabbage collards are less musky and more suitable for a vegan preparation, but I'm not sure if you can get them outside of North Carolina.

DemoWeasel
01-12-2010, 04:50 PM
All of those are awesome delicious foods.. be careful about Celery though it has a carcinogen in it!

D:

Violentvixen
01-12-2010, 05:01 PM
I love raw spinach. I will shove handfuls of it into my mouth as though it were potato chips.

it is king among leafy greens.

I eat romaine lettuce like potato chips, so I understand.

What is the celery carcinogen thing? I thought that was part of the bug defense and only applies to damaged and moldy celery.

nunix
01-12-2010, 05:02 PM
Uh.. fruit. Raw fruit. Pretty much any kind, depending on your taste. I am partial to apples and cantaloupe. Vegetables too, of course, but vegetables in general are not super thrilling to me. Potatoes is good though.

Also: nuts, assuming you don't have an allergy.

Homemade bread.

Basically "healthy" here is "as non-processed as you can get". Barring that, process stuff at home; that is to say, make and bake your own foods, and only buy raw ingredients.

Also, most things are "healthy" in moderation, so I mean.. a Wheat Thin isn't the equivalent of eating nuclear waste, but don't sit down and eat a whole box in an afternoon. Think more about healthy eating habits than about "health food" in and of itself. Although those are good to be mindful of too.

Dawnswalker
01-12-2010, 05:03 PM
Fruit.
Vegetables.
Milk.

Falselogic
01-12-2010, 05:07 PM
I eat romaine lettuce like potato chips, so I understand.

What is the celery carcinogen thing? I thought that was part of the bug defense and only applies to damaged and moldy celery.

I have no idea it's what the wife (plant biology grad student) told me.

Issun
01-12-2010, 05:08 PM
I'm very impressed by quinoa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinoa) as a protein source. Really hearty and not lacking in taste.

Really all you need is lemon juice and pepper and it's delicious. Hard to cook a small amount without burning it, though.

Falselogic
01-12-2010, 05:08 PM
Uh.. fruit. Raw fruit. Pretty much any kind, depending on your taste. I am partial to apples and cantaloupe. Vegetables too, of course, but vegetables in general are not super thrilling to me. Potatoes is good though.

Also: nuts, assuming you don't have an allergy.

Homemade bread.

Basically "healthy" here is "as non-processed as you can get". Barring that, process stuff at home; that is to say, make and bake your own foods, and only buy raw ingredients.

Also, most things are "healthy" in moderation, so I mean.. a Wheat Thin isn't the equivalent of eating nuclear waste, but don't sit down and eat a whole box in an afternoon. Think more about healthy eating habits than about "health food" in and of itself. Although those are good to be mindful of too.

Sounds like someone has been reading Michael Pollan... Not that I disagree with you or Mr. Pollan. The rule of thumb I use is that if I find an ingredient on a food that my grandmother wouldn't recognize I don't buy it.

nunix
01-12-2010, 05:24 PM
Sounds like someone has been reading Michael Pollan... Not that I disagree with you or Mr. Pollan. The rule of thumb I use is that if I find an ingredient on a food that my grandmother wouldn't recognize I don't buy it.

Eh.. no? A little bit of actual science reading/listening (such as learning that the calorie content of a raw food, and that same food cooked, is different; the cooked food will have more calories because it's easier for the body to digest), and being a little gunshy about long lists of chemicals, and that's about it. I'm assuming that oni writes "healthy" to mean "won't give me cancer and/or make me a fatass" so.. yeah.

Falselogic
01-12-2010, 05:41 PM
Eh.. no? A little bit of actual science reading/listening (such as learning that the calorie content of a raw food, and that same food cooked, is different; the cooked food will have more calories because it's easier for the body to digest), and being a little gunshy about long lists of chemicals, and that's about it. I'm assuming that oni writes "healthy" to mean "won't give me cancer and/or make me a fatass" so.. yeah.

Well then you might be interested in two of his books, "In Defense of Food" and "Food Rules"... If you want a longer exploration of the ethics of eating as well as a contemplation of what it means to eat you could also read "The Omnivores Dilemma"

Tomm Guycot
01-12-2010, 05:45 PM
So Weight Watchers and Skinny Cow both make Icecream which is just as delicious as real ice cream, but super low in calories/fat.

My fiancee is on WW and I eat her icecream by choice.

nunix
01-12-2010, 05:51 PM
Well then you might be interested in two of his books, "In Defense of Food" and "Food Rules"... If you want a longer exploration of the ethics of eating as well as a contemplation of what it means to eat you could also read "The Omnivores Dilemma"

Yeah I dunno about needing ethics about what you eat. A lot of it just seems like common sense to keep the machine (which is to say, the body) running well.

Warg
01-12-2010, 06:09 PM
My goodness, you guys, if ever there was anything you could almost eat like popcorn -- edamame, seriously. A big bag from Costco isn't too horribly expensive!

So Weight Watchers and Skinny Cow both make Icecream which is just as delicious as real ice cream, but super low in calories/fat.

My fiancee is on WW and I eat her icecream by choice.

Yeah, I normally don't eat ice cream sandwiches -- but I was introduced to the Skinny Cow versions of 'em, and yeah, they taste pretty great. The nutritional info was surprisingly reasonable.

Lady
01-12-2010, 06:32 PM
seconding the raw spinach. <3

what's wrong with putting cheese on salad? not like, melted cheese, but grated. Then again, I was putting green apples in salads during my brief Salad Period("what in the fridge could I conceivably put into a salad")

Merus
01-12-2010, 07:13 PM
I would guess because it's curdled fat.

Then again, feta cheese in a salad is a fine Greek tradition, and well worth adopting.

Coinspinner
01-12-2010, 07:42 PM
I can't eat plants because of the way they feel when I bite into them. I am doomed.

shivam
01-12-2010, 07:48 PM
start simple.

spinach, cranberries, walnuts or almond slivers, feta or blue cheese, and a balsamic vinagrette. Bam, healthy and tasty salad up in yalls.

Wolfgang
01-12-2010, 08:29 PM
Raw spinach with some vinegar on it is just a really good combo.

vaterite
01-12-2010, 08:44 PM
Salad Period

When you were green in judgement, cold in blood?

Phat
01-12-2010, 08:56 PM
Raw spinach and dijon mustard sandwiches.

Raw spinach and peanut butter sandwiches.

Wolfgang
01-12-2010, 09:32 PM
Raw spinach and peanut butter sandwiches.

Okay, that caught me by surprise.

Peanut butter and banana on whole wheat is another item that doesn't sacrifice any flavor for nutrition. It is a marvel.

bdazzld
01-13-2010, 12:32 AM
Morningstar Farms veggie burgers, tomato basil, spicy black bean etc. Ancho Chile ketchup for flavor, hummus as a spread, some spinach or other greens.

Jennie O turkey sausage sliced and added to tomato sauce with sauteed mushrooms over whole wheat pasta (barilla thin spaghetti is the best IMO).

Sliced chicken breast, dipped in dijon mustard, coated in seasoned oatmeal and baked.

Whole wheat penne bake, (al dente noodles, sauce, turkey sausage, part skim mozzarella, baked for 30 mins at 350)


Lots of alternatives out there that are flavorful and healthy :D

benjibot
01-13-2010, 12:49 AM
I think it's important to define what you mean by "healthy" because that will help you really focus in on what you want. The term healthy is far too nebulous to be really useful. Are you looking for fewer calories? Less-processed? Lower cholesterol? A particular nutrient?

Once you have the right framework in place and ask the right questions it gets much easier to find foodstuffs that fit your criteria and still taste awesome. I just don't like the word "healthy" in relation to food because shit man, all food is healthy in a certain way. We need it to live.

Red Hedgehog
01-13-2010, 01:03 AM
I pretty much agree with benjibot that "healthy" has several meanings from low fat to low calorie to low chemical to more natural to organic, etc. Assuming you mean low fat and calorie, several good ways to add flavor without adding (significant) calories have been mentioned like vinegar, mustard, and lemon/lime juice. Most spices are pretty empty as well.

Also for peanut butter, you really want low/no sugar and not say Jif or Skippy. But you probably knew that.

Makkara
01-13-2010, 08:21 AM
There are a number of foods that burn more calories to digest then you get from eating them!

Here is a list:

Celery
Oranges
Strawberries
Tangerines
Grapefruit
Carrots
Apricots
Lettuce
Tomatoes
Cucumbers
Watermelon
Cauliflower
Apples
Hot Chili Peppers
Zucchini

Wait, really? So you can, like, eat a sack of oranges every day and it'll make you lose weight? I guess that would explain why I never feel full no matter how many carrots or tomatoes I eat.

benjibot
01-13-2010, 12:30 PM
I didn't mean to just throw it back at you, but the concept of "healthy" is so broad and nebulous. Chasing it is liable to frustrate you to the point of giving up entirely. That's why I say it's best to, much like everything, have a specific goal in mind and do a bit of research on it. Also keep in mind what you do like to eat and why. Eating something just because "it's healthy" is a great way to hate it.

So here's a quick, easy recipe that I love. Greens like kale, collards, swiss chard, et al are a great source of vitamins A, and C, as well as iron, calcium, and potassium. Down south they cook 'em until they're not much more than mush in a pot with ham. While delicious, that's a great way to lose all those great nutrients. Here's what my wife and I do at least once every other week.

Get a bunch of greens. I like this best with collards but just about any greens you can find. Rinse 'em up in a sink of cold water and tear off the tough bits. If you've a salad spinner this is the time to break it out. Or maybe get one. Otherwise just shake off some of the water.

Mince some garlic. One or two cloves. Set 'em aside.

Heat up some oil in your biggest skillet with a lid. Doesn't matter what kind. Throw the greens in throw the lid on to wilt them a bit. Sauté them a bit. Maybe 2-3 minutes.

Toss the greens with liquid smoke and throw in the minced garlic. Sauté everything for about 30 seconds to a minute.

You could also swap out the liquid smoke for a minced chipotle pepper in adobo sauce.

Dadgum Roi
01-13-2010, 12:49 PM
So here's a quick, easy recipe that I love. Greens like kale, collards, swiss chard, et al are a great source of vitamins A, and C, as well as iron, calcium, and potassium. Down south they cook 'em until they're not much more than mush in a pot with ham. While delicious, that's a great way to lose all those great nutrients. Here's what my wife and I do at least once every other week.

I mentioned this upthread, but collards* in the south are always served in pot liquor, which retains the nutrients.

Also, pepper sauce goes great with any of these greens. Put unsliced chiles of your choice into a bottle of vinegar and let sit for several days. Now you have spicy vinegar for your greens.

*Or any other braised vegetable preparation, really. Field peas, snaps, black eyed peas, mustard greens, etc.

Silent Noise
01-13-2010, 12:52 PM
Tapenade when made simply.

Balrog
01-13-2010, 12:53 PM
I put grilled onions and bell peppers on everything that I can. Those are healthy, right?

Violentvixen
01-13-2010, 01:02 PM
Morningstar Farms

Man, I'd forgotten about those. So good!

I mentioned this upthread, but collards* in the south are always served in pot liquor, which retains the nutrients.

Dumb question, but what's pot liquor?

shivam
01-13-2010, 01:03 PM
the liquid in which the greens were cooked.

Dadgum Roi
01-13-2010, 01:08 PM
the liquid in which the greens were cooked.

10-4, good buddy. I think where most people go wrong when trying to do Southern style greens is they leave out the pot liquor and the pepper vinegar.

Also, in addition to collards, mustard greens and turnip greens are really good. Or you can do mixed greens.

Reinforcements
01-13-2010, 01:17 PM
I've never even cooked collards, but I bet you could make an awesome and INTENSELY NUTRITIOUS soup by adding lentils, cumin, pepper, and maybe mirepoix to the pot liquor. (On that note, lentils rock, are quick and easy to cook, and their protein is more complete than almost any other plant except soy.)

Dadgum Roi
01-13-2010, 01:21 PM
I've never even cooked collards, but I bet you could make an awesome and INTENSELY NUTRITIOUS soup by adding lentils, cumin, pepper, and maybe mirepoix to the pot liquor. (On that note, lentils rock, are quick and easy to cook, and their protein is more complete than almost any other plant except soy.)

That probably would be good if you had some left over. Most people here cook collards with some pepper(a bit each of crushed red and black) already.

benjibot
01-13-2010, 01:34 PM
Also, pepper sauce goes great with any of these greens. Put unsliced chiles of your choice into a bottle of vinegar and let sit for several days. Now you have spicy vinegar for your greens.

Oh hell yeah. I used to do this all the time. I used to have a set of little bottle caps that let you turn a pop bottle into a vinegar sprinkler. Wonder if I still have 'em.