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Dadgum Roi
01-19-2010, 12:53 PM
In which we post links to good food writing. There are a lot of food blogs out there, but I have trouble finding ones that go beyond "this is what we ate at Trendy Restaurant last night".

My favorite is a local one: the food blog at NCFolk.org. It tends to alternate between entries about Mexican immigrant culture/food and very obscure coastal North Carolina microcultures.

Here's a sample:

Tonight I visited La Cuata again. Being a Sunday, the place was a lot busier and had many more Jalisco specialties on the menu. The little café—it has six tables—serves tacos, tortas, sopes and other standard fare, but its glory is its stews, casseroles and soups. I can remember a pozole roja, a homemade chicken mole, and pollo encebollado con rajas, chicken smothered in onions with chiles. The specials board—don’t even look at the printed menu at La Cuata—also featured a very traditional egg dish, huevos tapatíos, eggs and chorizo smothered with a spicy tomatillo and chile sauce.

http://www.ncfolk.org/ncfood/tapatio.aspx

shivam
01-19-2010, 01:03 PM
I love food memoirs, like Bill Buford's Heat, The United States of Arugula, and of course Bourdain.

Blog wise, my two favorites are the same person in two different outlets-- my good friend Dave had a personal blog called Mange l'Orange (http://mangelorange.wordpress.com/) which led him to be picked up by the Orange County Weekly's Stick A Fork In It (http://blogs.ocweekly.com/stickaforkinit/). his articles are really great, and cover stuff like how to order vietnamese food, and really great ethnic studies.

As promised, today's edition of Ethnic Eating 101 concentrates on the two temperature extremes in Korean food: soon tofu, which is served literally boiling hot, and naengmyeon, which is served literally ice cold. No matter what the weather, there is a Korean dish perfect for it.

Before we start, a word about Korean tableware. Koreans use spoons at every meal and they are the only Asian culture which consistently uses metal chopsticks (usually stainless steel). If you're new to the art of chopstickery, you are going to be one frustrated diner after trying to pick up food with heavy metal chopsticks. They usually have raised bumps or grooves near the tips to assist with traction, but that's no guarantee of success.

Fortunately, Koreans don't use chopsticks for quite as many tasks as other Asians; rice, for example, is normally eaten with a spoon (or dumped into a pot of stew and then eaten with the spoon--this is not the etiquette horror it might be elsewhere), so the chopsticks are really only used for non-soupy, non-rice foods, which tend to be easier to eat with slippery metal. As long as you can eat it neatly with a spoon, you are OK manners-wise.

Why metal, incidentally? There's no canonical answer to the question; one of the more plausible theories seems to be that of the servers at Beverly Tofu House in L.A.'s Koreatown: Koreans use metal chopsticks because Koreans use metal spoons and Koreans like their utensils to match. This would explain the use of metal soup bowls and metal rice bowls as well.
ethnic eating 101 (http://blogs.ocweekly.com/stickaforkinit/ethnic_eating_101/)

Ample Vigour
01-19-2010, 01:16 PM
Jeffrey Steingarten isn't just a revolting asshole on Iron Chef, he's also a damn good writer. His stuff in Vogue is enough to make me pick up every single issue and rifle through the table of contents in search of another of his articles (personal favorites include his search for the best steak in America and his attempts to make perfect fried chicken.)

Dadgum Roi
01-19-2010, 01:18 PM
"Ethnic food" is one of those terms that grates on my nerves like crazy, but I use it myself because I can't think of a better alternative. "People who weren't here before LBJ food" does not exactly roll off the tongue.

shivam
01-19-2010, 01:19 PM
well, it fits the viet, korean, ethiopian, and mexican street food he so often covers. "Non-white Angelenos" could also do it, i guess.

Dadgum Roi
01-19-2010, 01:55 PM
well, it fits the viet, korean, ethiopian, and mexican street food he so often covers. "Non-white Angelenos" could also do it, i guess.

Technically, it fits all food, since everyone has an ethnicity. Which is why it grates on me. What we really mean when we say that is food pertaining to groups of people who arrived after the immigration reforms of the 1960s.

Violentvixen
01-19-2010, 09:43 PM
Although not in the traditional column format, I do like Cooking for Engineers. (http://www.cookingforengineers.com/)

shivam
01-31-2010, 01:25 AM
my friend wrote a fantastic blog entry about Ethiopian food (http://blogs.ocweekly.com/stickaforkinit/ethnic-eating-101/ethnic-eating-101-ethiopian/) that i think y'all should check out.

Calorie Mate
02-01-2010, 04:09 PM
Hey, that's awesome, since Abby and I have been kicking around the idea of trying Ethiopian food in Berkeley for awhile.

Sven
02-02-2010, 01:39 PM
Hey, that's awesome, since Abby and I have been kicking around the idea of trying Ethiopian food in Berkeley for awhile.

My recommendation is to grab a few friends, as in my experience the bigger the group the more interesting stuff you'll get.

Steingarten is very good, Bourdain obviously, but also check out any of Ruhlman's stuff. You'll know him as 'the poor sap who get accosted by Bourdain once a season on No Res', but his blog (http://blog.ruhlman.com/) is fascinating, as are his numerous books (co-author of The French Laundry cookbook, etc.)

Dadgum Roi
02-03-2010, 07:30 AM
Steingarten is very good, Bourdain obviously, but also check out any of Ruhlman's stuff. You'll know him as 'the poor sap who get accosted by Bourdain once a season on No Res', but his blog (http://blog.ruhlman.com/) is fascinating, as are his numerous books (co-author of The French Laundry cookbook, etc.)

I tried to pick up Ratio at B&N last night, and it was mis-shelved and they couldn't find it. Just as well I suppose, as I was about to pay $35 for Francis Mallmann's book on primitive Argentine grilling, and it is much cheaper online.

BodhiTraveller
02-03-2010, 10:14 PM
My favorite food blog is Not Eating Out in New York (http://noteatingoutinny.com/), not just for all of the great recipes, but for all of the neat community things and contests she mentions.