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taidan
01-20-2010, 01:38 PM
I love talking and reading about beer (mostly reading), and I saw a bit of it going on in another thread. So I figured we could go for an official topic for discussion.

Back in the other thread, there was a lot of back and forth about Pabst Blue Ribbon. I'm not a big fan of PBR, not because of who may or may not drink it. I've honestly never been able to finish a can of it, and only finished one bottle because it was paid for by a friend. I might have to sit down with one one more time to figure out what about it I don't like.

I'll have to add another vote for Yuengling as a favorite cheap sud. Another cheap, but local favorite of mine is Genesee Cream Ale. There's at least one liquor store in Maryland that sells it, and there's always a case in the house. I know a lot of people who think I'm insane for liking Genny Cream, so I've learned to not be so quick to judge everyone's taste in beer.

I guess I'll wrap it up with some favorite imports and Microbrews, a few of which I know other TT'ers enjoy.

New Belgium 1554 ale
Most of Dogfishhead's lineup
Brewer's Art Resurrection
Hoegaarden
Sam Adam's Scotch Ale
Lancaster Dairy Stout
Most of Troeg's brewery's output

Falselogic
01-20-2010, 01:40 PM
I love talking and reading about beer (mostly reading), and I saw a bit of it going on in another thread. So I figured we could go for an official topic for discussion.

Back in the other thread, there was a lot of back and forth about Pabst Blue Ribbon. I'm not a big fan of PBR, not because of who may or may not drink it. I've honestly never been able to finish a can of it, and only finished one bottle because it was paid for by a friend. I might have to sit down with one one more time to figure out what about it I don't like.

I'll have to add another vote for Yuengling as a favorite cheap sud. Another cheap, but local favorite of mine is Genesee Cream Ale. There's at least one liquor store in Maryland that sells it, and there's always a case in the house. I know a lot of people who think I'm insane for liking Genny Cream, so I've learned to not be so quick to judge everyone's taste in beer.

I guess I'll wrap it up with some favorite imports and Microbrews, a few of which I know other TT'ers enjoy.

New Belgium 1554 ale
Most of Dogfishhead's lineup
Brewer's Art Resurrection
Hoegaarden
Sam Adam's Scotch Ale
Lancaster Dairy Stout
Most of Troeg's brewery's output

Hey! My thread came first!

taidan
01-20-2010, 01:41 PM
Son of a... bad timing. Feel free to toast this one and use Falselogic's.

Red Hedgehog
01-20-2010, 02:03 PM
I kind of like that this one is just for beer and the other one is for any alcoholic beverages.

Just like we had a scotch thread, sometimes you really need to go into detail on a beverage, especially when it's as great as beer.

Alixsar
01-20-2010, 02:06 PM
I love talking and reading about beer (mostly reading), and I saw a bit of it going on in another thread. So I figured we could go for an official topic for discussion.

Back in the other thread, there was a lot of back and forth about Pabst Blue Ribbon. I'm not a big fan of PBR, not because of who may or may not drink it. I've honestly never been able to finish a can of it, and only finished one bottle because it was paid for by a friend. I might have to sit down with one one more time to figure out what about it I don't like.

I'll have to add another vote for Yuengling as a favorite cheap sud. Another cheap, but local favorite of mine is Genesee Cream Ale. There's at least one liquor store in Maryland that sells it, and there's always a case in the house. I know a lot of people who think I'm insane for liking Genny Cream, so I've learned to not be so quick to judge everyone's taste in beer.

I guess I'll wrap it up with some favorite imports and Microbrews, a few of which I know other TT'ers enjoy.

New Belgium 1554 ale
Most of Dogfishhead's lineup
Brewer's Art Resurrection
Hoegaarden
Sam Adam's Scotch Ale
Lancaster Dairy Stout
Most of Troeg's brewery's output

You're a good man!

KCar
01-20-2010, 02:07 PM
I spent the holidays drinking Propeller Brewery's Bitter in Nova Scotia. It was a wonderful time.

It pains me that it is no longer readily available. I crave hops so badly sometimes, and there are so few to be had in St. John's. SO FEW.

ringworm
01-20-2010, 02:33 PM
Agreed, beer deserves it's own thread.

I drink almost exclusively hoppy beers, particularly IPAs and American Imperial (Double) IPA. I just bought a case of the seasonal Bell's Hopslam, which is one of my favorite beers.

Some other favorites:

Lagunitas (Maximus, Hop Stoopid)
Dogfish Head 60/90 Minute (haven't had a chance to try the 120 Minute yet)
Bell's Brewery in general (Oberon, Two-Hearted, Expedition Stout, Hopslam, etc)
Surly Brewing (Furious, Coffee Bender...my favorite coffee beer)
Avery Brewing (Samael, The Beast)

In a pinch at places with lesser beer selections I enjoy Guinness and prefer a Half & Half (Guinness/Harp) to a Black & Tan (Guinness/Bass).

I've always liked, if not loved, a good wheat beer. I was at Oktoberfest in 2009 (and am seriously considering going back for the 300th anniversary in 2010), and the Germans have literally perfected the craft. I hit up 4 of the tents of classic Munich breweries (Paulaner, Hofbräu, Augustiner, and Löwenbräu). I also went to the Hofbräuhaus and Augustiner Bräu brewhouses later. Really amazing beer and experience.

The midwest in particular, and Minneapolis area specifically, has an extraordinary craft beer scene. There are a good number of great brew pubs that produce extremely good beer. For those in the area, Barley John's and Town Hall Brewery are two favorites. I attend the Autumn Brew Review (http://www.mncraftbrew.org/abr) annually, it's always one of the highlights of my year.

Lumber Baron
01-20-2010, 02:38 PM
The only mass-produced beer I've ever had is PBR. I've only had small, local micro-brewery stuff. I don't think I'll ever get a taste for it.

Ethan
01-20-2010, 02:45 PM
I'm not enough of a beer guy* to have a long list of favorites, but I can say without much doubt that the best beer I've ever had is Desolation IPA from the Amnesia brewpub in Portland. It can't be found outside of that one pub, as far as I know, which makes me feel a tremendous angst.

Off the top of my head, a few others that have impressed me: Rogue Dead Guy, Three Floyds Alpha King, Great Lakes Dortmunder Gold, Magic Hat No. 9, Lagunitas IPA.

*This apparently won't stop me from brewing my own, though. I already acquired the supplies.

StriderDL
01-20-2010, 02:50 PM
Ah, a fellow homebrewer! I think this thread will work out well, as it can also provide a place to exchange recipes! I've recently made a Brown Sugar Stout that gets more excellent with age, and an Oatmeal Scotch Ale that is amazingly smooth with a hint of smokiness at the end from smoked malts used in the wort. Currently bottle conditioning is a Belgian Dark Ale, while I have an Irish Red in the primary fermenter. It's not bubbling as much as I'd like though...I hope it's okay...

Pombar
01-20-2010, 02:58 PM
I drink a lot of crap tap lagers out of necessity, but hrmm. I really enjoyed the local beer in northern Yunnan, Dali. That stuff was great, but kinda hard to obtain elsewhere. The standard Chinese lager Qingdao/Tsingtao is pretty easy to find over here, and is pretty good.
Had some Bali Hai (a Balinese/Indonesian beer) recently, too. It was excellent! That, and some Southern English blonde beer, one of the Adnams varieties as I recall.

Bergasa
01-20-2010, 03:10 PM
I don't think anyone answered my question in discussion that spawned this thread:

If I want to try a good Japanese beer, what should it be?

ringworm
01-20-2010, 03:12 PM
If I want to try a good Japanese beer, what should it be?
I'd answer but I can't stand rice beer.

MCBanjoMike
01-20-2010, 03:14 PM
90% of the beer that I drink comes from Quebec (the rest is usually Leffe Brune). There are a ton of microbreweries here, and while most of them aren't great, the ones that are good are really very good. I'm a huge supporter of McAuslin and I think that their St-Ambroise Pale Ale is pretty much the best everyday beer you can get. They also do a nice Apricot Wheat Ale for those hot summer days, and their stout is supposed to be fantastic (I'm not a stout fan, so I can't really speak to its quality). The other good brewery in Montreal is Dieu du Ciel, whose Fumisterie is a hemp beer that is very interesting without tasting gimmicky.

Oh, and if you like IPAs and are ever in Montreal, get me to take you to a place that serves Hopfenstark's Post Coloniale. So good.

I don't think anyone answered my question in discussion that spawned this thread:

If I want to try a good Japanese beer, what should it be?

Domestic Japanese beer? What does that mean, something that's actually from Japan, or something that you can get domestically? 'Cause I'm pretty sure the latter doesn't exist.

Pombar
01-20-2010, 03:16 PM
Isn't Kirin Ichiban a Japanese beer that you can get basically everywhere? Certainly I've not had trouble laying my hands on some in a couple of European countries (including the UK) and in China.

Ethan
01-20-2010, 03:18 PM
Beerlao from Laos is surprisingly good.

Kirin is a Japanese brewery, but I'm pretty sure Ichiban is export-only, and it may even be US-made.

MCBanjoMike
01-20-2010, 03:21 PM
I've never seen any Kirin beer around here, the only options that you get in this town are Sapporo and Asahi. The former I can't recall ever seeing while I was in Japan, but I suppose the latter might be OK. I was never particularly drawn to Asahi, so I didn't drink it very often in Japan and consequently don't have much of an opinion on it.

I neglected to mention in my earlier post that there are some English beers that I quite enjoy drinking every now and again. Old Speckled Hen and Fuller's ESB are probably my two favorites at the moment, although I would love to go to England and get properly educated on the subject.

Dizzy
01-20-2010, 03:23 PM
I swear I only like dark beer... with hot strudels flavored with apple sauce.

StriderDL
01-20-2010, 03:26 PM
In my personal experience, and I have only tried Japanese beers here in the States, they all taste very samey. Sapporo, Kirin, and Asahi, doesn't matter. Light-bodied, with a clean and crisp "beer" taste. It really isn't too different from American mass-produced lagers, which also use corn and rice as adjunct's in the brewing process.

Pombar
01-20-2010, 03:35 PM
Beerlao from Laos is surprisingly good.It's about as ubiquitous as Qingdao, too. You can pretty much tell which students at my university took a gap year before coming by who owns a Beerlao T-Shirt (damn everyone bar me going to South East Asia).

Patrick
01-20-2010, 04:02 PM
I had a Hopslam last night. It was delicious... and quite alcoholic.

I love beer. Usually I'd prefer to have 2 or 3 good beers and call it a night, sometimes I'll go for cheap beers and just get wasted. Although I'm very picky when it comes to hard stuff, I've never met a beer I didn't like.

My love of beer started when I was in college, and a few of my friends would regularly go to Goose Island's Clybourn Brew Pub (http://www.gooseisland.com/pages/clybourn_brewpub/65.php). My favorite beer is probably their Imperial Pale Ale.

I wish I had checked this thread earlier, but I'm heading out from work. I have a lot more to say about drinking and microbrewing and homebrewing, but that's going to have to wait till later. Good thread!

The-Bavis
01-20-2010, 04:08 PM
Although best in the summer, I am on a big Heffeweizen kick for that last couple of years. Love that stuff. Lots of breweries are making their own version lately and it gives me lots to try! Sure, it's kind of a wimpy beer, but I don't care.

nunix
01-20-2010, 04:19 PM
Dark, stout, bitter. Lagers are alright on a summer afternoon but other than that, no thanks.

re: Kirin: yeah, Kirin you buy in the US is US-made. I expect whatever you buy in Canada is also US-made (California, to be exact). In a year of college drinking, I never saw/heard someone order a Kirin in Japan. When you're out, it's usually Sapporo, sometimes Asahi. If you're buying for home or a party, it's Asahi.

I keep thinking about starting homebrewing but it's intimidating and also I just don't think I'd drink that much to make it worth it, it'd have to be some kind of really small batch.

pence
01-20-2010, 04:34 PM
I love stouts, belgians, IPAs, but that's pretty typical beer nerd stuff. But since I doubt anyone will bring it up, I actually like Magic Hat #9. The apricot actually works for me.

I express this with surprise, because I have never met someone who shares this opinion, beer snob or otherwise.

StriderDL
01-20-2010, 04:56 PM
I keep thinking about starting homebrewing but it's intimidating and also I just don't think I'd drink that much to make it worth it, it'd have to be some kind of really small batch.

Small batches (http://brooklynbrewshop.com/store/), you say?

I am sure other places offer kits that let you make just a gallon, but this is the only one I am aware of. A standard kit will make 5 gallons, or ~48-52 bottles. Personally, I do it with a friend and split what we make. Then I end up giving away a bunch cause I want people to try it. So really, 5 gallons goes before you know it.

nunix
01-20-2010, 05:00 PM
Small batches (http://brooklynbrewshop.com/store/), you say?

I am sure other places offer kits that let you make just a gallon, but this is the only one I am aware of. A standard kit will make 5 gallons, or ~48-52 bottles. Personally, I do it with a friend and split what we make. Then I end up giving away a bunch cause I want people to try it. So really, 5 gallons goes before you know it.

Hey, that's pretty good. Thanks for the tip, I may pick that up and try it out.

Dampe
01-20-2010, 05:07 PM
Beer is the best. I'll jump on the New Belgium bandwagon as well, can't recall a single beer of theirs that I didn't like, plus they do a crazy bike tour through Boise (and other places) that is a ton of fun. I like pretty much everything except for American style lagers (Coors/Bud/Miller) but I generally stick with Amber Ales or IPAs.

We have a local brewery here that is fantastic and I get almost all of my beer there fresh in growlers, although sometimes I'll stock Sam Adams bottles for a party or for backup. I like pretty much any style of Winter seasonal beer.

So in summary; hooray beer!

Ethan
01-20-2010, 05:12 PM
The other night I got a little bit lightheaded from one single New Belgium 2 Below. 6.6 is a strong beer when you've skipped a meal on account of watching 30 Rock all day.

StriderDL
01-20-2010, 05:17 PM
Hey, that's pretty good. Thanks for the tip, I may pick that up and try it out.

Anytime! I am something of a homebrew missionary. There is nothing better than fresh beer, and the fact that you made it yourself makes it that much sweeter. Or bitter. Whatever.

Falselogic
01-20-2010, 05:19 PM
I like a good Peroni every now and again though they're not very easy to find around here (outside of good Italian restaurants.) It's a crisp pale lager with a clean finish

Bergasa
01-20-2010, 05:33 PM
Thanks for the info on the Japanese beers. I guess I'll take a look and see what they have next time I am at the store.

At my university's lounge/bar, they have this thing (I think it's called Around the World or something) where you drink 40 different beers from different places. If you do it, you get a t-shirt at the end. I'm thinking about partaking.

pence
01-20-2010, 05:40 PM
Wow, I hope they let you take them one at a time. Even if they're just small samples, 40 at once seems like way to many to really enjoy the beers and you'd just destroy your palette.

Falselogic
01-20-2010, 05:42 PM
Wow, I hope they let you take them one at a time. Even if they're just small samples, 40 at once seems like way to many to really enjoy the beers and you'd just destroy your palette.

As well as possibly die of alcohol poisoning

Pombar
01-20-2010, 05:44 PM
Thanks for the info on the Japanese beers. I guess I'll take a look and see what they have next time I am at the store.

At my university's lounge/bar, they have this thing (I think it's called Around the World or something) where you drink 40 different beers from different places. If you do it, you get a t-shirt at the end. I'm thinking about partaking.

Yeah, there's a big bar/pub in Central London whose selling point is their massive selection of international booze, so that's been the prime location to do Around the Worlds.

Bergasa
01-20-2010, 05:44 PM
I should clarify that you don't have to drink them all at once. You get like a stamp card.

estragon
01-20-2010, 05:46 PM
In my personal experience, and I have only tried Japanese beers here in the States, they all taste very samey.

It's worth noting that most of those are actually brewed in Canada (at least, I'm sure Sapporo is) and taste pretty different from what you get in Japan. In most cases, when you buy a Japanese beer in North America, you're paying for the brand name.

. . . which is not to say that you can't have a legitimate argument about the quality of actual Japanese beer, but that's a separate discussion than one about the quality of Canadian beers with Japanese brands.

StriderDL
01-20-2010, 05:46 PM
I did one of those at a local bar in college. I think it was about 70 bottles of beer from varying locales and styles, one of which being a rauchbier, or quite literally "smoke beer." Not advisable for pairing with anything other than smoked meats, fish, etc.

Also, I got a pretty sweet pewter mug at the end.

pence
01-20-2010, 05:52 PM
I should clarify that you don't have to drink them all at once. You get like a stamp card.

I would totally do this. Once I found a place where I could buy bottles (I have to go to Delaware for it) I started going down the shelf and trying everything that wasn't too expensive.

StriderDL
01-20-2010, 05:55 PM
It's worth noting that most of those are actually brewed in Canada (at least, I'm sure Sapporo is) and taste pretty different from what you get in Japan. In most cases, when you buy a Japanese beer in North America, you're paying for the brand name.

. . . which is not to say that you can't have a legitimate argument about the quality of actual Japanese beer, but that's a separate discussion than one about the quality of Canadian beers with Japanese brands.

Interesting, I did not know that. My Japanese beer lore is admittedly lacking.

fumner
01-20-2010, 06:23 PM
I don't think anyone answered my question in discussion that spawned this thread:

If I want to try a good Japanese beer, what should it be?

If you can find it, try a Hitachino (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/697) beer. I really like their espresso stout. They also brew a beer that is aged in sake casks which I think is delicious.

TK Flash
01-20-2010, 06:27 PM
Well, all I know is Japanese beer, and I like it quite a bit. My German beer-loving friend likes it too, but I don't know if he thinks it compares with German beer or if we both just love pounding 'em back. Don't even bother with the stuff you get in the States, it's not even close to the same. I did a side-by-side comparison last spring and even a first-time drinker could tell the difference.

Opinions ahead: Kirin is the worst-tasting brand, whether we're talking Ichiban or Lager. Sapporo Black Label is sweet and easy to drink but tiresome and watery. Asahi Super Dry is the workhorse beer that you can drink every day, and is quite bitter. Suntory Malts is a personal favorite, it's a bit sweet and more full-bodied that Sapporo but still extremely drinkable.

As for the premium beers (they cost like, what, 30 yen more than the standard ones), Suntory Premium Malts is the king. It's my favorite beer on the shelf, and drinking it side-by-side with Yebisu (Sapporo) and Asahi Prime Time (do they make that anymore?), you can really tell the difference in quality.

I usually don't bother with seasonal or short-run beers. Every company currently has a Lager on the shelf, and a couple have dark beers, but I have yet to have any. Last year, summer of '08 Kirin did a small run of bottled white beer which was fantastic, I bought out all the local shops.

estragon
01-20-2010, 06:30 PM
As for the premium beers (they cost like, what, 30 yen more than the standard ones), Suntory Premium Malts is the king.

TK Flash gets it.

(Although I like Kirin more than Asahi Super Dry...)

TK Flash
01-20-2010, 06:31 PM
I could have an aversion to Kirin because that was my seasonal drink for a very depressing and lonely winter.

Edit: I will give bonus points to Kirin for actually tasting different than the other beers. And I never complain when Kirin is served at a restaurant. Maybe I just don't like it in cans.

Merus
01-20-2010, 07:42 PM
I almost exclusively drink pilsners, although there's so many great beers here that I'll usually take a gamble. My most successful one was Beez Neez, which is a honey wheat beer that was delicious.

Of the mainstream Australian lagers, I like Cascade, Coopers, Hahn and Boags. Tooheys Old is also surprisingly tasty, although New is decidedly average.

Ethan
01-20-2010, 07:45 PM
YOUY MEEN U DONT DRINK FOSTERS WTF

"Fostehs. Uhstrylian fo beeah."

Pombar
01-20-2010, 07:49 PM
I've never met an Australian who actually drinks that muck. It's no Stella Artois, but... yeech.

Merus
01-20-2010, 10:54 PM
I've never met an Australian who actually drinks that muck. It's no Stella Artois, but... yeech.
It's only drunk ironically, and it's hard to buy because it's not that profitable to stock. Most Australians would rather buy something something better.

HEY GUYS I'm drinking a James Squire pilsener right now.

SEanEF
01-21-2010, 01:51 AM
Yay beer!

Pencil me in as another homebrewer, though I don't do it very often.
I enjoy the results, but it's kind of a pain in the ass. Mainly the cleaning, which wouldn't be so bad if I had a decent sized sink to scrub things in. Another thing that makes me sad is it's not particularly economical, though I have yet to investigate internet prices for the supplies.

Oh, and Strider, don't worry about the slow bubbling, your beer is probably fine.

Zeroneight
01-21-2010, 04:54 AM
Gimme a harsh IPA and I'm hoppy.

Dadgum Roi
01-21-2010, 06:48 AM
Yeah, there's a big bar/pub in Central London whose selling point is their massive selection of international booze, so that's been the prime location to do Around the Worlds.

Bierodrome? It was closed when I was there. :(

Pombar
01-21-2010, 07:16 AM
Nah, the one I'm thinking of is in Central London - the Bierodrome that I know of (I think there's a couple?) is in Islington (which is where I live, but whatevs).

Dadgum Roi
01-21-2010, 07:19 AM
Nah, the one I'm thinking of is in Central London - the Bierodrome that I know of (I think there's a couple?) is in Islington (which is where I live, but whatevs).

I thought we spent all of our time in central London, although it's been years and I had hardly slept.

Pombar
01-21-2010, 07:27 AM
Islington is pretty much in the middle of London, if that's what you mean, but Central London is its own specific (fairly tiny) area.

Kirin
01-21-2010, 09:19 AM
Oh hey look, everyone's talking about me in this thread. Or not.

Anyway, as I mentioned in the other alcohol thread, I 'm not terribly fond of the "beer" taste per-se, so I've gotten into beers sort of sideways-like, starting with raspberry lambic and branching out into some various stouts and seasonal brews. Nothing too hoppy for me, thanks.

My current favorite concoction is to take a Young's Double Chocolate Stout and drop just a bit of Lindeman's Framboise lambic into it. I actually found this at a bar in Raleigh and started doing it myself at home. Dee-licious.

Red Hedgehog
01-21-2010, 10:44 AM
90% of the beer that I drink comes from Quebec (the rest is usually Leffe Brune). There are a ton of microbreweries here, and while most of them aren't great, the ones that are good are really very good. I'm a huge supporter of McAuslin and I think that their St-Ambroise Pale Ale is pretty much the best everyday beer you can get. They also do a nice Apricot Wheat Ale for those hot summer days, and their stout is supposed to be fantastic (I'm not a stout fan, so I can't really speak to its quality). The other good brewery in Montreal is Dieu du Ciel, whose Fumisterie is a hemp beer that is very interesting without tasting gimmicky.

You neglected to mention Unibroue. Their Trois Pistoles beer is delicious!

It is upsetting to me that New York doesn't have as good a microbrew scene as Utah did. As such, all the higher quality beers tend to be pretty expensive (though Brooklyn Brewery makes some good stuff).

Yuengling is my drink of choice for trivia night at the bar - $6 including tips for a beer and personal pizza? Yes, please.

Calorie Mate
01-21-2010, 11:18 AM
So hey I tried New Belgium 1554 last night (courtesy of Alixsar) and it was pretty ok. It has a weird coffee/chocolately after taste that was...well, odd. I don't like coffee but didn't hate this, though. Interesting stuff.

taidan
01-21-2010, 11:31 AM
Oh cool, the thread is rolling.

There was an Irish pub I used to live near that sold Beamish Stout, which I thought was pretty decent at the time. I want to try it again and compare it to some other stouts I've had since.

My roomate got some Beerlao after sampling it in Vietnam. I have no idea if it is hidden, or if he already drank it all.

Anyone ever tried Yuengling's other beers, aside from Lager/Black & Tan? I bought a six pack of Porter once, but it tasted like it had been in there for a while. It has been too long since I tried a Lord Chesterfield Ale, so I don't have strong memories of the taste.

All my friends agree that Sam Adam's Cream Stout is a terrible beer, but I remember it tasting like I expected it to. Their Cranberry Lambic, however, is a taste I have yet to appreciate.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 12:07 PM
Anyone else enjoy Red Stripe? I like the little stout bottle and it tastes pretty good too.

It's also the only beer I have a shirt for!

StriderDL
01-21-2010, 02:38 PM
You neglected to mention Unibroue. Their Trois Pistoles beer is delicious!

Unibroue can do no wrong in my book. La Fin du Monde, Don di Dieu...all of it, fantastic!

It is upsetting to me that New York doesn't have as good a microbrew scene as Utah did. As such, all the higher quality beers tend to be pretty expensive (though Brooklyn Brewery makes some good stuff).

I assume you mean within the city limits, my dear Hedgehog! While not in in the city, Blue Point Brewery here on Long Island is fantastic. Best part is it is 5 minutes from work so I can get fresh growlers at whim! If you are interested you can take the LIRR out to Patchogue. Addtionally, Great South Bay Brewery will be opening in June, also on the island. Exciting times!

I'm not intimately familiar with upstate, but I know the Saranac makes damn fine stuff, and I place Ommegang on par with Unibroue.

Calorie Mate
01-21-2010, 02:55 PM
Anyone else enjoy Red Stripe? I like the little stout bottle and it tastes pretty good too.

It's also the only beer I have a shirt for!

I have a box of it in my fridge right now, actually. I like it quite a bit, as far as beers go.

ringworm
01-21-2010, 03:02 PM
Anyone else enjoy Red Stripe?
I like...the commercials.

Patrick
01-21-2010, 03:53 PM
Red Stripe is tasty stuff, but I think it's generally a little overpriced.


I can't think of a good way to organize this, so here's a big list of beers I like in no particular order:

Prima Pils and Golden Monkey from Victory
Dogfish Head IPAs
Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and Torpedo extra IPA
Anchor Steam
New Glarus Spotted Cow
Fat Tire from New Belgium
Bell's Oberon; Third Coast; Two Hearted; Winter White Ale; Hopslam; others
Magic Hat #9
Great Lakes Dortmunder Gold; Burning River; Eliot Ness; Edmund Fitzgerald
Harpoon IPA
Brooklyn East India Pale Ale; Lager; Brown Ale; Winter Ale
Yuengling
Summit Pilsner
Flying Dog Pale Ale
Lagunitas IPA
North Coast Red Seal, Scrimshaw and Old Rasputin
Delirium Tremens
Lindeman's Framboise
New Holland Dragon's Milk and Mad Hatter IPA
Bear Republic Hop Rod Rye & Racer 5
Green Flash West Coast IPA
Ska Modus Hoperandi
Abita Turbo Dog
Summit EPA
Ommegang three Philosophers
Red Hook IPA
Two Brother's Cane and Abel
Allagash White
Founder's Breakfast Stout
Half Acre Lager & Daisy Cutter Pale Ale
Metropolitan Flywheel
Three Floyds Gumballhead; Alpha King; Rabbid Rabit; Moloko; Robert the Bruce; Alpha Klaus; Pride & Joy, and lots of others
Rogue Dead Guy Ale
Lots of stuff from Goose Island.

Also:
Pilsner Urquell, Spaten, Stella Artois, PBR, High Life, Point, Shiner Bock, new Schlitz, Guinness, Murphy's, Heineken, Harp, Tiskie, Peroni, probably a bunch of other stuff.

That list is a lot longer than I expected, and I left a ton out. I didn't even touch on much outside the US. I often go to The Map Room (http://www.maproom.com/beer.htm), Quenchers (http://www.quenchers.com/beer.htm) and The Hop Leaf (http://www.hopleaf.com/draft_menu.html), which all have incredible menus that rotate weekly. Chicago also has really good beer warehouses (http://www.binnys.com/index.cfm) that stock or can get pretty much everything you could want, and hosts many beer festivals (http://illinoisbeer.com/).

Also, I have the equipment and ingredients to start homebrewing, but I've been putting it off. I'm going to start with a small batch of red ale, hopefully within the next month or so.

Wow, I hope I don't come off as too much of a drunk! I have friends who are really into craft beers, and I tend to drink a huge variety of beers, but not a lot of any given kind. Generally when I go out for dinner I try at least one beer that I've never had before.

Red Hedgehog
01-21-2010, 03:57 PM
I assume you mean within the city limits, my dear Hedgehog! While not in in the city, Blue Point Brewery here on Long Island is fantastic. Best part is it is 5 minutes from work so I can get fresh growlers at whim! If you are interested you can take the LIRR out to Patchogue. Addtionally, Great South Bay Brewery will be opening in June, also on the island. Exciting times!

I'm not intimately familiar with upstate, but I know the Saranac makes damn fine stuff, and I place Ommegang on par with Unibroue.

Actually, I know there are a few good upstate breweries. I was mainly speaking for what is available is the corner bodega. But I will have to do more research. I do believe that I have seen Blue Point.

Pombar
01-21-2010, 03:58 PM
Patrick came off as someone who really knew what they were talking about until he listed Stella/Wifebeater.

Patrick
01-21-2010, 03:59 PM
Patrick came off as someone who really knew what they were talking about until he listed Stella/Wifebeater.

haha, I ruined it all for my love of Stella. Also, High Life and PBR.

EDIT: what's with the particular hatred of Stella anyway? I've never heard it referred to as wifebeater.

Pombar
01-21-2010, 04:42 PM
It's pretty much renowned for being the ultimate lowest thing you can drink here, this side of White Lightning (which is a Cider).

Red Hedgehog
01-21-2010, 04:49 PM
EDIT: what's with the particular hatred of Stella anyway? I've never heard it referred to as wifebeater.

Really? I've heard it called that even in the US.

Gwrrrk
01-21-2010, 04:49 PM
Anyone else enjoy Red Stripe? I like the little stout bottle and it tastes pretty good too.

It's also the only beer I have a shirt for!

Once. I remember it being pretty tasty!

Patrick
01-21-2010, 05:05 PM
It's pretty much renowned for being the ultimate lowest thing you can drink here, this side of White Lightning (which is a Cider).

Really? I've heard it called that even in the US.

I've honestly never really considered it to be a bad beer. It's better than Budweiser or MGD, and I'd probably put it on par with Pilsner Urquell or Tiskie.

Now if you want some really bad beer, try Stag. In fact, one bar in my area sells a can of beer simply labeled "American Beer," which is probably the worst thing I've ever tasted. Even at $1 a can I consider it overpriced.

pence
01-21-2010, 05:06 PM
I live right down the street from Victory, so there's an awful lot of Hopdevil on tap around here. I'd still rather have a Stone IPA, but I always feel obligated to buy local when I can. I feel the same way with Victory Storm King vs. Old Rasputin. I'd rather have an Old Rasputin, even though it's not my home team.

Pombar
01-21-2010, 05:19 PM
I've definitely tasted worse than Stella (supermarket own-brand beers spring to mind), but it's pretty godawful regardless.

StriderDL
01-21-2010, 05:51 PM
Actually, I know there are a few good upstate breweries. I was mainly speaking for what is available is the corner bodega. But I will have to do more research. I do believe that I have seen Blue Point.

Their flagship beer is called Toasted Lager, which is pretty much self explanatory. It is delicious! The only other one of theirs I've seen in bottle form is Hoptical Illusion, which is a very nice IPA.

However, as far as IPAs go, Harpoon still takes the crown. Deliciously floral palate.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 05:55 PM
I used to like Stella Artois a lot... but I think the last time I had it, I had far less beer experience. I wonder if I would hate it now.

I tried an Old Ras once. After one sip, I convinced myself I could finish the bottle. After the second sip, that dream died. I tried offering the rest of it to my friends, and none of them wanted it, so I poured it down the sink. The thin layer of beer appeared completely opaque as it slid across the edge of the sink. I was mortified. I should try it again!

ringworm
01-21-2010, 06:11 PM
Stella should only be drunk if your only other options are Budweiser or Miller variants.

Gwrrrk
01-21-2010, 07:37 PM
I had a friend in the first year of university who would only drink this one extremely cheap brand called Yankee Jim. It was the least expensive thing to buy at the liquor store.

Labatt Blue is also a terrible beer.

taidan
01-21-2010, 07:52 PM
that reminds me, my roomate used to live near Bluepoint brewery and took a tour. Real small op, owner was real friendly. I had the regular and Hoptical during a visit and was impressed.

StriderDL
01-21-2010, 09:21 PM
Yeah, you wouldn't recognize the place if you weren't looking for it. I whole-heartedly love each of their offerings, with my favorite being their Oatmeal Stout. And they currently have an Imperial Cherry Stout that is only available in their tasting room. It is fantastic and everyone should try it. Now. I will drive.

benjibot
01-22-2010, 01:24 AM
Now this is a thread I can get behind.

I can't believe we're on the third page and nobody has mentioned Unibroque yet.

EDIT: Oops! It was mentioned. I just missed it.

I should have more to say, but strangely cannot think of it. Currently I am drinking Lagunitas IPA. Yay beer!

Lagunitas puts out some terribly, terribly good stuff. And it all has dogs on it!

Sidenote: I've been saving bottle caps. Our previous dog had a collar with beer caps on it. I've been collecting Chicago-related bottle caps in the hopes that I can have a similar collar custom made for our current dog. I think I'll probably have a Lagunitas cap added as well.

Kylie
01-22-2010, 03:59 AM
Given that the first post in this thread mentioned Brewer's Art's Resurrection beer, I can only suggest that perhaps the finest beer I have ever enjoyed, philistine that I am, is Brewer's Art's Sour Cherry Bier. Which is due to come back into season in about a month or so.

Mmmmm Cherries.

taidan
01-22-2010, 08:47 AM
Given that the first post in this thread mentioned Brewer's Art's Resurrection beer, I can only suggest that perhaps the finest beer I have ever enjoyed, philistine that I am, is Brewer's Art's Sour Cherry Bier. Which is due to come back into season in about a month or so.

Mmmmm Cherries.

The Sour Cherry is a damn fine drink, but I've only had it once, so I didn't want to list it.

NevznachaY
01-22-2010, 08:52 AM
I'm all over German and Czech brands (well, they're the ones you're most likely to find here - but that's because they really are good): Paulaner, Krusovice, Erdinger etc.

I can't believe that there's practically no love for the German stuff in this thread.

pence
01-22-2010, 09:04 AM
Re: German beer, and bocks specifically, I tried Salvator and Optimator back to back. They're pretty much on par, but Optimator is the Coke to Salvator's Pepsi (in terms of sweetness). I prefer Optimator.

Other than that, I remember enjoying a Franziskaner Hefe, been a long time since I've had it though.

Kirin
01-22-2010, 09:27 AM
My wife is pretty much a German and Belgian beer connoisseur, but I'm afraid I don't know that much about them myself. She's into the wheat beers particularly.

taidan
01-22-2010, 09:31 AM
I'm all over German and Czech brands (well, they're the ones you're most likely to find here - but that's because they really are good): Paulaner, Krusovice, Erdinger etc.

I can't believe that there's practically no love for the German stuff in this thread.

I'd love to try some more, but I seem to have better luck going to any region and finding a local craft brew than a decent German import. I know of one real good store for beer, but I can't drive there.

I'll write some of those names down and keep them in mind.

Pombar
01-22-2010, 09:35 AM
There's a barestaurant in Beijing called The Tree (attached to a hostel iirc) whose 24 page menu is 1 page food + soft drinks, 1 page pizza, and 22 pages Belgian Beers. When I return there, I may have to turn to this thread for recommendations on where to start.

Patrick
01-22-2010, 09:42 AM
I'm all over German and Czech brands (well, they're the ones you're most likely to find here - but that's because they really are good): Paulaner, Krusovice, Erdinger etc.

I can't believe that there's practically no love for the German stuff in this thread.

German beer is great! I actually went on a mini beer tour of Ireland, Germany and Belgium. I spent most of my time in Germany around Bonn and Koln, and I was traveling with friends who had lived there. Most restaurants that I went to didn't even give me brands to choose from, you just choose the beer style. Kolsch beers are great in the summer, and I also drink a lot of Weizenbocks, Doppelbocks and Marzen. I've had Paulaner before, but I've never heard of the other two that you mentioned, I'll have to keep an eye out for them. Bitburger, Warsteiner and Becks are all pretty popular in the US. Oh yeah, Spaten is one of my favorites as well, and is often available on tap.

The best part about drinking in Germany is the Purity Order, which forbids brewers from adding preservatives to their beer. It's something that you don't notice in American Beers, until you've drank some of the alternative. Oh, and also you can drink on trains and buy beer from vending machines. Germany is really a great place to drink.

Patrick
01-22-2010, 09:46 AM
There's a barestaurant in Beijing called The Tree (attached to a hostel iirc) whose 24 page menu is 1 page food + soft drinks, 1 page pizza, and 22 pages Belgian Beers. When I return there, I may have to turn to this thread for recommendations on where to start.

Keep an eye out for Half Man's Brugse Zot (Halve Maan (http://www.halvemaan.be/)). I went on a brewery tour there when I was in Bruge, and it's since become one of my favorites.

NevznachaY
01-22-2010, 09:47 AM
Krusovice is Czech, though, keep that in mind.

(One of my favourite beer-based things is "Krusovice rezane", where they take half a pint of lager and then pour half a pint of porter over it; tastes a lot better than it sounds).

pence
01-22-2010, 10:09 AM
I've always known that drink as a Black and Tan (although the porter can be any dark beer you like). Most of the time if you order it here you'll get Guinness Draught and Bass, where the Guinness floats on top because the nitro bubbles are lighter. Yuengling also makes a black and tan that comes in a bottle, which seems to be missing the point.

Patrick
01-22-2010, 10:18 AM
I usually see Black & Tans with Guinness and Harp.

ringworm
01-22-2010, 10:20 AM
I usually see Black & Tans with Guinness and Harp.
That is called a Half & Half. I prefer them to Black & Tans.

Posaune
01-22-2010, 10:41 AM
Now I just want to live in Germany again.

In Baden-Wurttemburg there was this smaller "cult" beer called Rothaus Tannenzaepfle and it was all pinecone flavored. It was pretty gross, but I'd love to get my hands on it here. Rothaus also has the best logo of any beer company. I love you Rothaus lady.

StriderDL
01-22-2010, 10:45 AM
You can drink on some trains in the US. I'll be doing it this afternoon, in fact!

Also, I do enjoy my German and Czech beers, Krusovice being introduced to me by a Dutch friend of mine. However, and I don't know if this is necessarily not happening in Germany and beyond, I find that American craft breweries tend to innovate a whole lot more with styles and ingredients. It may just be that they are more widely available, of course. It would make sense that I would only find the "standard" import beers here in the States while a ton more variety is seen overseas.

SEanEF
01-22-2010, 03:52 PM
The German Purity law is a fun/weird thing. It's not just preservatives, it's ANYTHING. If you make beer with anything other than the 4 ingredients, your not allowed to call it beer. You can still make it and sell it, but you just can't say it's beer. Evidently, this plays some minor havoc with imports like Belgium lambics and anything that added something during secondary fermentation for flavoring. I think they label them as malt liquor or something.

Silver
01-22-2010, 05:26 PM
I'm a fan of Belgium wheat ale's, especially Witbier's. There's been a couple of mentions of Hoegaarden, which is apparently very representative of this style of beer. I don't enjoy Hogaarden very much though - to me it has a sour undertone that takes away it's drinkability.

A lot of people say Blue Moon is a bastardized Americanization of this style, but I enjoy that a lot, especially on draft. It's just smoother and has a sweeter taste to it (the orange peel and coriander are more evident as well). Adding an orange might make me a conformist fruit, but I like it.

Another example of this style that is just way out there is Leinenkugel's Sunset Wheat. It's quite popularly refereed to as "fruity pebble beer" because it tastes exactly like eating a bowl of it. Pretty crazy.

I feel that certain beers go best with certain foods. Peroni's for example complement the acidity of Italian dishes, while Tsingtao and Kirin bring out the complexities of Asain dishes. If I'm having a pizza, it has to be Molson Canadian on draft, though.

One thing I hate about beers in green bottles - they skunk so easy. I actually really like Tsingtao, Moosehead, Heinkeen and a lot of other green bottle beers, but will refuse to buy them unless they're kept in dark storage or are close packed. Light pollution saps them of their flavor.

So Merus, how despised is Fosters down there? lol. It's the only thing they sell at outback, I wish they'd offer some real Australian beer. =(

Queen Possum
01-24-2010, 12:33 AM
A lot of my favorite beers are small regional breweries.

Back home I liked Big Boss Beers. (http://www.bigbossbrewing.com/home.php) Hell's Belle was pretty great. You can't get it outside of NC, unfortunately, and I always forget to swing by a Total Wine before I come home to get some.

Here in GA, we're fans of Sweetwater, (http://www.sweetwaterbrew.com/) which, quite frankly, I haven't met a person yet who didn't like it. So far, that's only available in the South. The Blue is a DAMN good beer.

Abita (http://www.abita.com/) is pretty great too. I think that one is a little more widespread than the others.

Another vote for Yuengling as best cheapo beer. The 2 years I lived in GA before our stupid liquor board would let it into the state were intolerable for me. No one should have to go back to Bud light after that.

Merus
01-24-2010, 12:39 AM
So Merus, how despised is Fosters down there? lol. It's the only thing they sell at outback, I wish they'd offer some real Australian beer. =(

Fun fact: there are Outback Steakhouses in Australia. Their approach here is to be as un-kitchy as possible.

Paul le Fou
01-24-2010, 07:34 AM
I don't think anyone answered my question in discussion that spawned this thread:

If I want to try a good Japanese beer, what should it be?

The correct answer is to run the fuck the other direction. Japanese beer is just another light lager in the style of the "big" brands here in America, only made well enough to be drinkable in a pinch. There is extremely little variation in general beers here. The big brands try a seasonal specialty beer for a week here and there and otherwise don't venture outside their specialty (same as the American bigs). The microbrew scene is practically nonexistant. In fact, it was basically illegal to run a microbrewery in Japan until 1994, because to operate a brewery you needed to produce 2 million liters a year according to tax law. Now it's down to manageable levels (60,000 I think) but the microbrew scene is fittingly small for something only 16 years old. They exist, but it's very hard to find their beers in anything but specialty stores and those anywhere but the brewery's general vicinity. You generally have to go to a big city to even find a selection of imports beyond Guinness, Heineken, Corona, etc, and even there it can be hard to track down and expensive - although this trend is changing.

Don't even get me started on Happoshu.

(For my money Kirin is the least shitty of the big brands and the one I keep in my fridge.
I hate Asahi dry with a passion, it's aggressively flavorless and has given me a hangover without getting me drunk first.
Sapporo is forgettably mediocre to me, but that's mostly because it's not generally available in my area.
Suntory's "The Malts" is drinkable on the same aggressively mediocre level as any of the others.
I also like Yebisu well enough but it's harder to find and for being so similar to any given main brand it makes me chuckle that it's a "premium" beer. Yebisu Black isn't bad, either, but that's probably just because I'm so goddamn starved for some beer variety that I'll take what I can get.)

Honestly, compared to the variety of beer you can get at the increasing number of specialty bars and thanks to the growing popularity of microbrews in America, "Japanese beer" is not really something that's worth being interested in. It's just another plain light lager. Try one, add the notch to your belt, go on to better things.


Alternate non-helpful smartass answer belonging in the mind-blowing revelations thread: just drink sake. It is not in fact a wine, but a kind of beer.

Dadgum Roi
01-24-2010, 07:43 AM
Lessee.

Local stuff:

Duck-Rabbit (http://www.duckrabbitbrewery.com/) out of Farmville, NC for dark beers.

My absolute favorite is The Weeping Radish (http://www.weepingradish.com/) in Currituck County. Owned by a Bavarian expat, they do German style beers to the standards of the Reinheitsgebot. The Christmas doppelbock is my favorite, but everything they do is awesome.

I've never seen it in the US, but southern Chile makes some superb beers. If you ever see it, try Kunstmann's black bock, or Austral's pale lager.

Paul le Fou
01-24-2010, 07:53 AM
Fun fact: it was a beer thread some years ago that first got me to register and start posting at Talking Time! I love beer and miss it terribly. Also I like beer enough to post twice in sequence. Hooray!

I'm a big fan of Belgian and Belgian-style beers, mainly. Generally unimpressed with Irish beers I've had, and English stuff has only been a little better. The darker the better: I consider an amber beer a refreshing, light drink. Malt over hops any and every day of the week.

New Belgium, Bells, Avery and Unibroue tend to be my favorite breweries, although I just like to try everything and sort it out from there. Special props to Cleveland's pride and joy, the Great Lakes Brewing Company. The New Belgium tour was fantastic though - it's free, you get to try a free sampling of four of their beers (including brewery-only specialties, like the Dandelion Ale they had when I was there, or the ridiculously-sour cask ale they poured for us on the tour). If you're in Ft. Collins, CO: GO.

~New Belgium 1554 and Rogue Dead Guy were the first "good" beers I had that set me on the path to being a connoisseur but they're no longer among my favorites
~High-profile Belgian beers I love include St. Bernardus, Gulden Draak, Pauwel Kwak (love that glass), and Leffe Blonde, not to mention Rochefort. Chimay may be the best-known, but that doesn't mean they're not good beers (blue and red esp., white is a little bland for me).
~Lion Stout and Dragon's Milk are excellent super-dark beers.
~I really like Barley Wines, but some tend a bit too hoppy for me
~Flemish sour ales can be great but I need to be in a mood for them.
~One of my favorite kinds of special beer is stuff brewed in Bourbon casks. Bonus combo points for the Barley Wine I had like that.


The worst part of my love for beer is that I make it a mission to try everything I can, so I've had very many beers - and very few more than once, so I can't recall too many specifics or standouts off the top of my head (especially if I've had them later in the night). But man, going into a beer section for me is like letting a kid loose in a candy shop. Actually the worst part of my love for beer is that I currently live in Japan, but oh well.

Dadgum Roi
01-24-2010, 07:59 AM
Oh man, I totally agree about Lion Stout. I can't find it in stores here, just at a restaurant which I don't really like. :(

StriderDL
01-24-2010, 08:04 AM
The worst part of my love for beer is that I make it a mission to try everything I can, so I've had very many beers - and very few more than once, so I can't recall too many specifics or standouts off the top of my head (especially if I've had them later in the night). But man, going into a beer section for me is like letting a kid loose in a candy shop.

This is me. And I easily spend 15-20 minutes in the cooler agonizing over my choice.

"Do I want a few fresh Blue Point growlers? Or do I go for the Harpoon variety pack that just got in? Well, I suppose I could get both...but does that make me look like an alcoholic? I mean, I was just here a few days ago..."

Merus
01-24-2010, 08:07 AM
The correct answer is to run the fuck the other direction. Japanese beer is just another light lager in the style of the "big" brands here in America, only made well enough to be drinkable in a pinch.

In Australia, a lot of the trendier pubs and clubs have Japanese beers on tap, which makes them ideal for avoiding the beers I don't like much.

Paul le Fou
01-24-2010, 08:50 AM
This is me. And I easily spend 15-20 minutes in the cooler agonizing over my choice.

"Do I want a few fresh Blue Point growlers? Or do I go for the Harpoon variety pack that just got in? Well, I suppose I could get both...but does that make me look like an alcoholic? I mean, I was just here a few days ago..."

Seriously. I was JUST about finished with my grocery store's selection after a year or so, but the other grocery store across the street had even more, and that's without checking the liquor or beer/wine stores. And this is just in suburban Cleveland! My friend moved to New York for school and lives within walking distance of beer houses and multitudes I could only dream of.

Then I moved to Japan. I am so sad about beer.

Queen Possum
01-24-2010, 11:57 AM
My absolute favorite is The Weeping Radish (http://www.weepingradish.com/) in Currituck County. Owned by a Bavarian expat, they do German style beers to the standards of the Reinheitsgebot. The Christmas doppelbock is my favorite, but everything they do is awesome.

I'd heard of the Weeping Radish restaurant, but I had no idea they had a brewery.

I've got to go to Asheville this summer for a wedding, so I think I will be getting some Highland (http://www.highlandbrewing.com/) while I'm there (tho according to their website this is now being distributed in GA. Hm.), and hopefully also hitting up the Bier Garden. (http://www.ashevillebiergarden.com/)

Dadgum Roi
01-24-2010, 12:03 PM
I'd heard of the Weeping Radish restaurant, but I had no idea they had a brewery.

Yeah, it's actually more of a brewery/bar than a restaurant. The state had to change its laws regarding brewing to even allow the owner to open the thing- this was in the early 80s. Unfortunately, they moved from their nice gasthaus-looking digs in Manteo to Currituck a few years ago. Apparently the new decor is American country store, but they still do all the same beers. We used to hit up the Manteo location a few times a year, but I haven't checked out the new one.

Highland is very good, I'll second them. Asheville is a really good town for craft beer.

Ethan
01-24-2010, 12:24 PM
Just recently tried Hoegaarden for the first time. Excellent!

Patrick
01-24-2010, 01:46 PM
Duck-Rabbit (http://www.duckrabbitbrewery.com/)

The Weeping Radish (http://www.weepingradish.com/)

southern Chile makes some superb beers.

Kunstmann's black bock

Austral's pale lager.

Lion Stout.

Highland (http://www.highlandbrewing.com/)

I've never heard of any of these (nor tried chilean beers). I'll have to keep an eye out for them. I'm probably visiting a friend in Huntsville AL later this year, and I'm hoping to try out some southern beers that aren't available up here. They passed a law very recently that allows higher volume beers to be sold, so hopefully I will be able to find a place with a good selection.


New Belgium, Bells, Avery and Unibroue tend to be my favorite breweries, although I just like to try everything and sort it out from there. Special props to Cleveland's pride and joy, the Great Lakes Brewing Company. The New Belgium tour was fantastic though - it's free, you get to try a free sampling of four of their beers (including brewery-only specialties, like the Dandelion Ale they had when I was there, or the ridiculously-sour cask ale they poured for us on the tour). If you're in Ft. Collins, CO: GO.

The best brewery tour I've been on is Lakeshore Brewery in Milwaukee. It was very cheap and informative, and they give you a lot of beer. I've heard good things about some breweries in the pacific northwest though, and I'll stop by New Belgium if I'm ever out that way.


~High-profile Belgian beers I love include St. Bernardus, Gulden Draak, Pauwel Kwak (love that glass), and Leffe Blonde, not to mention Rochefort. Chimay may be the best-known, but that doesn't mean they're not good beers (blue and red esp., white is a little bland for me).

http://richardwilsonauthor.files.wordpress.com/2008/09/pauwel-kwak.jpg

The glass that Kwak is served in is actually called a carriage glass or lantern glass, and they were originally made so that carriage drivers could drink while driving and then set the glass where the lantern would go. One of my friends has one, and he thinks it's hilarious to use it for mixed drinks (it kind of is hilarious).


~One of my favorite kinds of special beer is stuff brewed in Bourbon casks. Bonus combo points for the Barley Wine I had like that.


I'm pretty sure that the beer is brewed normally and then aged in bourbon casks (or whiskey or wine casks). Barrel aged beers are extremely tasty.

Kirin
01-24-2010, 01:50 PM
Back home I liked Big Boss Beers. (http://www.bigbossbrewing.com/home.php) Hell's Belle was pretty great. You can't get it outside of NC, unfortunately, and I always forget to swing by a Total Wine before I come home to get some.

I'm quite fond of Big Boss's seasonal Harvest Time ale...

Abita (http://www.abita.com/) is pretty great too. I think that one is a little more widespread than the others.

...and my wife really loves Abita's Satsuma Harvest Wit...

Duck-Rabbit (http://www.duckrabbitbrewery.com/) out of Farmville, NC for dark beers.

...and Duck-Rabbit's Milk Stout is also a staple around here.

NevznachaY
01-24-2010, 03:50 PM
Hoegaarden is among my favourite beers as well. It's citrus-y and zesty!

Gulden Draak is so tough. I'm an able drinker, but this tiny bottle? It can knock me out.

Red Hedgehog
01-24-2010, 07:01 PM
Their flagship beer is called Toasted Lager, which is pretty much self explanatory. It is delicious! The only other one of theirs I've seen in bottle form is Hoptical Illusion, which is a very nice IPA.

I feel like an idiot because I've definitely had Blue Point Toasted Lager before. In fact at some point, I know I had some in my fridge. Which currently only a single Sam Adams in it because this thread inspired me to drink the last of the Harpoon's Winter Warmers (bought mainly because my girlfriend loves cinnamon - it's okay but I wouldn't purchase again). Anyway, I'll pick up some Blue Point stuff next time I stock up.

Also, all the recent talk about German beers and I feel a bit like a Philistine because I prefer American-style Hefeweizens to German-style.

Queen Possum
01-24-2010, 07:07 PM
Yeah, it's actually more of a brewery/bar than a restaurant. The state had to change its laws regarding brewing to even allow the owner to open the thing- this was in the early 80s. Unfortunately, they moved from their nice gasthaus-looking digs in Manteo to Currituck a few years ago. Apparently the new decor is American country store, but they still do all the same beers. We used to hit up the Manteo location a few times a year, but I haven't checked out the new one.

Highland is very good, I'll second them. Asheville is a really good town for craft beer.

I think I'm remembering the Manteo location, then.

I forgot to mention Carolina Blonde. (http://www.carolinabeer.com/Carolina_Beer/Beers/) I've never had any of the Cottonwood brews, tho I'm kinda curious now.

(For the record, I spend the last 6 months I was in NC trying all the local brew beers I could. I have no idea what prompted it.)

Paul le Fou
01-25-2010, 08:31 AM
I'm pretty sure that the beer is brewed normally and then aged in bourbon casks (or whiskey or wine casks). Barrel aged beers are extremely tasty.

You're right. I didn't even mean brew, either. It is most likely impossible to brew it in a barrel, to boot.

I also don't remember typing Rochefort into my list of Belgian beers. I like Rochefort well enough but I wouldn't normally list it in my favorites. Was I drunk when I wrote this post? I don't think I was.

Great Lakes Brewing Company has a pretty popular witbier style called the Holy Moses, if you're into Hoegarden and live in the midwest. It's got all the citrusy and coriander stuff to boot. It's pretty tasty! They also do a Christmas Ale that the entire city of Cleveland flips its collective shit over (grocery stores ration it out, can't buy more than 2 packs at a time), although I think Bell's had a Christmas one a while back that I liked more. Bell's also has a great Amber Ale, and actually a whole ton of great beers, including their flagship Oberon ale, another great witbier style.

Patrick
01-25-2010, 09:50 AM
Bell's is great! They just returned to Illinois after a three year break because of a distribution fight. In the meantime, they sold Kalamazoo beers, which had different recipes and weren't branded as Bell's (but were still tasty). They ended up resolving the issue, and I think the Kalamazoo beers are now sold under the label "Bell's Kalamazoo."

So, this weekend I bought a six pack of Magic Hat #9 and a six pack of Sierra Nevada Glissade, which is their new seasonal. It has an unusual tart taste, I'm not sure whether I like it or not yet. On Friday night I went to a concert and drank some Goose Island Mild Winter Ale (delicious), and on Saturday I ended up drinking Carlsberg at a fund raiser because it was on special (not especially great).

StriderDL
01-25-2010, 09:52 AM
While we are on the subject of witbiers, South Hampton Brewing Company makes a fine Double White Ale. Uses orange and coriander rather than lemon, which I prefer. Think Sam's seasonal spring offering, the White Ale, in terms of taste, just stronger. I don't know how proliferate they are, though. I'm not even sure that Red would find it in Brooklyn.

Dawnswalker
01-25-2010, 01:32 PM
Went to Brewsters (http://brewsters.ca/) last night. The food was okay, but the real reason to go is for the beer anyway.

I had their River City Raspberry Wheat Ale, but most of what they've got is good stuff. Someday, when I have more money, I have to talk someone into going with me and just getting a whole bunch of bottles.

pence
01-25-2010, 01:57 PM
Fun fact: it was a beer thread some years ago that first got me to register and start posting at Talking Time! I love beer and miss it terribly. Also I like beer enough to post twice in sequence. Hooray!

First post buddies:
http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?t=1603&page=2#48
http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?t=1603&page=2#49

http://i47.tinypic.com/2mebkhc.jpg

Gwrrrk
01-25-2010, 03:04 PM
I picked up some Bavaria (http://www.bavaria.com/) yesterday.

I think it's a pretty good beer for the price.

Ethan
01-26-2010, 07:25 PM
I am drinking Orval Trappist Ale. Amazing. Has a grapefruity hop aroma. The flavor comes in little waves, with citrusy sour alternating with medicinal bitter. Super crisp, super dry, very fizzy. Bright. Not at all what I expected from a Trappist beer with this much alcohol. One of the most graceful, subtle beers I've had.

It was $7 for an 11-ounce bottle from the liquor store.

Patrick
01-27-2010, 09:47 AM
Tonight at Goose Island:

There's still room for Wednesday night's Beer Academy - Winter Warmers! Come try out Ommegang's Adoration, Great Divide's Hercules Double IPA, Brooklyn's Monster Ale, Founder's Old Curmudgean Ale, Corsendonk's Abbey Brown Ale, Goose Island's Robert Burns, Goose Island's Liquid Inspiration Stout and many more! It starts... at 6:30 p.m. and is only $15! Call 312-915-0071 to sign up. Cheers!

but instead I will be having dinner with my parents in the suburbs and watching the State of the Union. :(

Kirin
01-31-2010, 05:26 PM
So, I mentioned this thread to my wife, and she came by and read the whole thing. Since she's not likely to actually register here any time soon, she wants me to pass on her hearty recommendations for 1554, Hoegaarden, and for those in the NC vicinity, Lone Rider's local brews, particularly the Shotgun Betty Wheat.

Also, Grant, depending on how close you are to Chapel Hill this may or may not be practical, but she remembers running across the Lion Stout on the menu of Tandoor indian on East Franklin Street.

Dadgum Roi
01-31-2010, 05:36 PM
Also, Grant, depending on how close you are to Chapel Hill this may or may not be practical, but she remembers running across the Lion Stout on the menu of Tandoor indian on East Franklin Street.

There's actually a place right down the street from me that has it. I'm just not so keen on their food. It's very mediocre barbecue, which I don't really have any patience for. Now, I will head over to Ham's and gladly scarf down a terrible Reuben just because they have good beer, but bad barbecue is something I can't countenance.

Ethan
01-31-2010, 06:30 PM
So, I just brewed my first batch of homebrew today. It was based on a recipe for a German altbier that a coworker recently brewed, but the ingredient list had to be augmented because the brewing store was out of some stuff. It definitely smelled like beer as it went into the fermenter, though, so I assume it will come out as beer when it has fermented and conditioned, unless I made some kind of mistake that contaminated the batch. It appears that the yeast is already hard at work, which is a good sign.

More on this in 4-6 weeks. Ah, brewing.

Posaune
01-31-2010, 07:07 PM
So, I just brewed my first batch of homebrew today. It was based on a recipe for a German altbier that a coworker recently brewed, but the ingredient list had to be augmented because the brewing store was out of some stuff. It definitely smelled like beer as it went into the fermenter, though, so I assume it will come out as beer when it has fermented and conditioned, unless I made some kind of mistake that contaminated the batch. It appears that the yeast is already hard at work, which is a good sign.

More on this in 4-6 weeks. Ah, brewing.

I want to do this, but also am hoping to move out of the country so I don't want to buy all of the equipment. How much beer did you make?

Ethan
01-31-2010, 07:19 PM
I'm hoping to move out of the country as well, but I was conveniently able to borrow most of the equipment from a friend who already left the country.

I tried to do enough to fill a standard 5-gallon carboy, but I ended up with something like 4 to 4 1/2 gallons due to the reduction of the wort and a complication of the siphoning process. I'll probably end up with around 7 6-packs' worth.

It's quite fun. If you don't want to make a huge investment (of money as well as space), I'd suggest getting one of the single-gallon kits from Brooklyn Brew Shop (http://brooklynbrewshop.com/store/). The $55 complete kits are a pretty good deal.

StriderDL
01-31-2010, 07:19 PM
So, I just brewed my first batch of homebrew today. It was based on a recipe for a German altbier that a coworker recently brewed, but the ingredient list had to be augmented because the brewing store was out of some stuff. It definitely smelled like beer as it went into the fermenter, though, so I assume it will come out as beer when it has fermented and conditioned, unless I made some kind of mistake that contaminated the batch. It appears that the yeast is already hard at work, which is a good sign.

More on this in 4-6 weeks. Ah, brewing.

Ah, the smell of boiling wort. Everything will be fine so long as you kept everything nice and sterile. And remember:

Relax, have a homebrew.

You know, once you have a stock and get to brewing more.

Ethan
01-31-2010, 07:33 PM
I made liberal use of my iodophor sanitizing bucket, but it wasn't a completely germ-free process. It's pretty hard to do the more precarious steps, like racking the wort into the fermenter, without touching something that ends up in the beer or leaving something open to the air for half a minute. I did make sure my yeast was already on a roll before adding it, though, so I'm hoping it will easily overpower the tiny quantity of contaminants that made it in. I feel like I kept things pretty clean in general.

I'm going to pick up a more advanced sanitizer next time, like Five Star.

fumner
01-31-2010, 07:43 PM
I'm going to pick up a more advanced sanitizer next time, like Five Star.

I do prefer Star San, but there's really no need to buy more sanitizer unless you're completely out of iodophor. I used that for my first two years of homebrewing and I never had any problems.

Edit: Also, homebrewing is awesome! I currently have a belgian dark strong ale (made using homemade dark candy syrup as an adjunct) aging in a secondary fermentor. I also have plans to brew a ton of IPAs in the next few months since my brother gave me three pounds of hops for Christmas.

StriderDL
01-31-2010, 07:56 PM
I have a Belgian Dark bottle conditioning, currently. Irish Red is being bottled on Tuesday. The next beer to be brewed will be a Chai Porter. Haven't done anything like it before, so we shall see. The main question we have is whether to steep the tea before adding the rest of the components to the wort, or to do it right at the end of the boil. My buddy and I are also considering throwing some lactose in to give it a more velvety mouthfeel. Any thoughts?

fumner
01-31-2010, 08:59 PM
I have a Belgian Dark bottle conditioning, currently. Irish Red is being bottled on Tuesday. The next beer to be brewed will be a Chai Porter. Haven't done anything like it before, so we shall see. The main question we have is whether to steep the tea before adding the rest of the components to the wort, or to do it right at the end of the boil. My buddy and I are also considering throwing some lactose in to give it a more velvety mouthfeel. Any thoughts?

Usually when I'm brewing new recipes I like to "ease in" to new ingredients which could potentially ruin an otherwise great beer. My advice is to add only a small amount of the chai tea at the end of the boil. While the beer is fermenting, you could make a chai tea tincture by infusing a small bottle of vodka with a ton of tea. Right before the beer is ready to bottle, taste it to see how much of the chai flavor comes through. If it's to your liking, just bottle it. If it needs more, pull off a measurable amount of beer (12 ounces or so) and with a dropper add the tincture dropwise and keep tasting until you get the right level of chai-ness. Knowing that 1 drop is usually about 1/20 mL you can calculate how much of the tincture to add to the rest of your beer.

I do like the idea of a Chai Porter, and the addition of lactose is very interesting and could work really well. I'd say just go for it and if it doesn't turn out well you'll at least have a good starting point for future experiments.

Patrick
02-01-2010, 11:08 AM
So on Friday I went to the Brew & View and drank a few Leinenkugel Reds. On Saturday I had some Goose Island IPAs at a housewarming party. Also, we decided to get a keg of Domaine Dupaige (http://www.twobrosbrew.com/Domaine%20Dupage.htm) for our superbowl party. I am excited for football times.

Kirin
02-01-2010, 11:16 AM
The next beer to be brewed will be a Chai Porter. Haven't done anything like it before, so we shall see. The main question we have is whether to steep the tea before adding the rest of the components to the wort, or to do it right at the end of the boil. My buddy and I are also considering throwing some lactose in to give it a more velvety mouthfeel. Any thoughts?

I don't know anything about home-brewing, but that sounds delicious. Also, I had a Japanese Lactose Stout once that was quite good.

Dampe
02-01-2010, 09:31 PM
I just picked up a 12 pack of New Belgium's spring seasonal pale ale Mighty Arrow.

Verdict: It's pretty good!

Ethan
02-02-2010, 05:23 AM
What's the deal with spring beers being available now? New Belgium, Magic Hat, and (I think) Anchor all have a spring beer in stores. It's fucking February. I'm freezing my ass off. It doesn't seem right.

StriderDL
02-02-2010, 05:28 AM
I am sure the bizarre 4 week window for Sam Adams White Ale is coming up too.

I found Rising Moon, Blue Moon's (or Coors', whatever) spring offering two weeks ago.

Odin
02-02-2010, 06:33 AM
It's fucking February. I'm freezing my ass off. It doesn't seem right.

Damn straight. That said, I'll have to look for the New Belgium one. Fat Tire and 1554 have been good times, so I'm eager to try their other offerings.

Dampe
02-02-2010, 09:22 AM
What's the deal with spring beers being available now? New Belgium, Magic Hat, and (I think) Anchor all have a spring beer in stores. It's fucking February. I'm freezing my ass off. It doesn't seem right.
Agreed - I'd prefer they keep their winter beers on the shelf into at least March since spring doesn't come here until late April early May at the earliest.

StriderDL
02-02-2010, 09:39 AM
Ever hear of this place (http://chelseabrewingco.com/)? If so, how is it?

nunix
02-02-2010, 09:44 AM
I made liberal use of my iodophor sanitizing bucket, but it wasn't a completely germ-free process. It's pretty hard to do the more precarious steps, like racking the wort into the fermenter, without touching something that ends up in the beer or leaving something open to the air for half a minute. I did make sure my yeast was already on a roll before adding it, though, so I'm hoping it will easily overpower the tiny quantity of contaminants that made it in. I feel like I kept things pretty clean in general.

Well, don't forget that humans have been making beer for a hell of a lot longer than they've had sanitiser (or even the concept of such a thing!), so random bits o' stuff is unlikely to turn out something horrible.

nunix
02-02-2010, 09:53 AM
Anytime! I am something of a homebrew missionary. There is nothing better than fresh beer, and the fact that you made it yourself makes it that much sweeter. Or bitter. Whatever.

Bitter, definitely bitter. Pretty much all stouts for me.

Well, I just went ahead and ordered that 1-gallon kit, sooo.. hopefully will get started on that in a couple of weeks. ;P

Ethan
02-02-2010, 10:00 AM
Which style did you get?

Well, don't forget that humans have been making beer for a hell of a lot longer than they've had sanitiser (or even the concept of such a thing!), so random bits o' stuff is unlikely to turn out something horrible.

Yeah, good point.

My fermentation is rolling nicely. The airlock is popping steadily, there's a healthy head on the wort (when does it stop being called wort?), and the bubbling smells like delicious hop aroma. I'm already starting to think about what my second recipe will be.

StriderDL
02-02-2010, 10:43 AM
Which style did you get?



Yeah, good point.

My fermentation is rolling nicely. The airlock is popping steadily, there's a healthy head on the wort (when does it stop being called wort?), and the bubbling smells like delicious hop aroma. I'm already starting to think about what my second recipe will be.

The wort is the sweet, concentrated liquid you have after mashing. It's what you boiled. Once you added the water and pitched the yeast it's beer.

Although, I guess you could still call it wort until the fermentation process is complete. It doesn't sound as delicious though.

nunix
02-02-2010, 05:58 PM
Which style did you get?

The basic kit from here (http://brooklynbrewshop.com/store/), which Strider linked me earlier. None of the flavours were particularly appealing. I thought I was getting cap+capper with it, also, but I don't think I am.. but that's something that'll be easy enough to rustle up around town (or just via Amazon).

StriderDL
02-02-2010, 07:55 PM
For those of you embarking on your great career of homebrewing, I suggest picking up The Complete Joy of Homebrewing by Charlie Papazian, one of the grandpappys of the homebrew movement in the US. It is very informative, containing tips for both beginner and seasoned brewers. It holds a number of recipes as well as information on hop varieties, adjuncts, and yeast selection (always go liquid, I says). $15 at Barnes & Noble.

Also, nunix, due to the size of your kit most commercially available beer kits (the ingredients, that is) will include too much stuff for you, as they are geared towards 5 gal batches. You may wish to invest in a small scale so you can measure everything out yourself.

fumner
02-02-2010, 08:45 PM
John Palmer's How to Brew is free, and recommended reading for new brewers. (http://www.howtobrew.com/intro.html) I learned to brew while reading this. I like Papazian's book too.

Another great resource for homebrewers that have gained a bit of experience already is Jamil Zainasheff's Brewing Classic Styles. He is an award winning homebrewer, and his book has a recipe for every style of beer you can think of. I've brewed several of his beers and they are splendid. Here is his website (http://www.mrmalty.com/) and here is his podcast (http://thebrewingnetwork.com/shows/The-Jamil-Show). His podcast pretty much covers all the recipes in his book, and is another great free resource.

And if anyone wants some specific homebrewing advice, PM me, I'd love to help (but I don't want to clog this thread with too many technical details.)

So, does anyone else like sour beer? Gueuze, Lambic, American Wild Ale, etc.? A great accessible sour beer is Lindemans Gueuze Cuvée René. Unlike a lot of Lindemans other beers, this one doesn't add any sugar to "soften" the sour. Great stuff.

StriderDL
02-02-2010, 09:19 PM
Opened a dedicated homebrew thread (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?t=9500) for those interested.

Paul le Fou
02-03-2010, 07:17 AM
I have had some great Flemish sour ales in my time. I have to be in a mood for it though, it's a pretty different experience. And I had this barrel-aged sour beer from New Belgium that... wow. It was just... wow. I can't even call it good or bad, it was plain ridiculous.

Kirin
02-03-2010, 08:27 AM
Well, don't forget that humans have been making beer for a hell of a lot longer than they've had sanitiser (or even the concept of such a thing!), so random bits o' stuff is unlikely to turn out something horrible.

Hell, letting stuff get into it is how you make a lambic in the first place. (Though, it may have to be Belgian stuff for that to work out right...)

Dadgum Roi
02-03-2010, 08:31 AM
So, does anyone else like sour beer? Gueuze, Lambic, American Wild Ale, etc.? A great accessible sour beer is Lindemans Gueuze Cuvée René. Unlike a lot of Lindemans other beers, this one doesn't add any sugar to "soften" the sour. Great stuff.

Pretty much everything I've ever had from Lindemans has been great. I just wish I could find their kriek lambic more often. I usually can only find the framboise and the peche, which are good, but not as good(and as subtle) as the kriek.

fumner
02-03-2010, 07:37 PM
I have had some great Flemish sour ales in my time. I have to be in a mood for it though, it's a pretty different experience. And I had this barrel-aged sour beer from New Belgium that... wow. It was just... wow. I can't even call it good or bad, it was plain ridiculous.

Was it La Folie (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/192/1917)? That beer is quite sour, and is one of my favorites. New Belgium makes quite a few fantastic American Wild Ales.

Hell, letting stuff get into it is how you make a lambic in the first place. (Though, it may have to be Belgian stuff for that to work out right...)

You are right that this is pretty much how lambics are made. For beers that are spontaneously fermented, the region in which they are brewed is absolutely important. This type of fermentation is exactly as it sounds - the wort is just left out in the open and the wild yeast and bacteria of a region are allowed to "infect" the beer. You can do this outside of Belgium, but depending on the area you may have poor results. Most American breweries instead use bacteria (lactobacillus and pediococcus) and wild yeast (brettanomyces) cultures to infect their wild/sour ales. I've got a few sour beers I'm going to be brewing soon, but I'll post about those in the homebrew thread sometime later.

Paul le Fou
02-04-2010, 08:06 AM
Was it La Folie (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/192/1917)? That beer is quite sour, and is one of my favorites. New Belgium makes quite a few fantastic American Wild Ales.

Why, I do believe it was!

Patrick
02-04-2010, 08:34 AM
Hey Destro, here's the brewery that just opened:

Revolution (http://revbrew.com/)

And the other one in Chicago:

Metropolitan (http://www.metrobrewing.com/)

Ethan
02-04-2010, 10:18 AM
Whoa, Metropolitan is about 2 blocks away from my apartment! Maybe I should volunteer for them.

Ethan
02-05-2010, 08:02 PM
I picked up some of Metropolitan's Dynamo copper lager. Pretty wonderful. It's clear and refreshing like a lager should be, but it has a deep, toasty malt flavor that reminds me of maple syrup.

MCBanjoMike
02-06-2010, 07:28 PM
Currently drinking: Fumisterie, a red hemp beer brewed in Montreal at Dieu du Ciel. This beer is handily in my top 5 bottled beers and, despite being a hemp based beer, doesn't taste the least bit gimmicky. It's pretty hard to find even in Montreal (though I managed to find some today in Quebec City), but it's totally worth it for anyone with an interest in amber ales.

Red Hedgehog
02-09-2010, 12:45 AM
Ever hear of this place (http://chelseabrewingco.com/)? If so, how is it?

I've only been to Heartland (the other brewpub in Manhattan) which has good beer, but so-so food.

Kirin
05-09-2010, 06:44 PM
Resurrection for interesting beer.

Today I had a Hitachino Espresso Stout. Hitachino is a brewery in Japan; I had their milk stout a while back because someone recommended it as something I might like, and I noticed the taproom I was in for lunch carried a few of their beers. All of their stouts seem to have this kind of weird aftertaste that I can't really describe but isn't bad. The Espresso was pretty tasty.

fumner
05-09-2010, 08:21 PM
If you can find it, try a Hitachino (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/697) beer. I really like their espresso stout. They also brew a beer that is aged in sake casks which I think is delicious.

Coffee stouts are great. I'm not much of a coffee drinker in general just because I try to limit my caffeine intake, but the taste of coffee is so complementary to a nice stout that I can't resist these beers. Bonus points if it's a bourbon barrel aged coffee stout, like Founder's Kentucky Breakfast Stout. The most elegant and excessive beer I've ever had was Kopi Luwak (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kopi_Luwak) Alesmith Speedway Stout (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/396/54035). Just ridiculously good ("this is the shit!").

ringworm
05-09-2010, 09:31 PM
I wish any of you people who enjoy Coffee Stouts could try Surly Four, hands down the single best coffee stout I've ever had. Unfortunately you never will, and I probably won't again either.

Marfy
05-10-2010, 04:30 AM
If anyone's in the UK, BrewDog makes a great pilsner - 77 Lager. You can find it at most supermarkets. It's really become my go-to beer.

When I was in Germany, I discovered the magic of mixing beer and lemonade. It was called radler in some places, alster in others. Apparently it's a pretty common thing in Europe? My French friends acted as if I'd just discovered water when I told them about it.

Kirin
05-10-2010, 07:35 AM
Huh. When I was in Germany, a Radler usually seemed to be something like beer + 7Up (or some equivalent). Regardless, it was a pretty useful way for me to consume beers that I otherwise didn't like as much, when we were at some place without my preferred ridiculous beers.

Marfy
05-10-2010, 08:35 AM
I had it made with both lemonade (of the clear, sparkling European variety) and 7UP, but my German-speaking friend said the menu always called it lemonade. It didn't taste much different either way.

That's exactly why I loved it, too. I'm picky about my beer, but radler was always delicious and cheap.

NevznachaY
05-10-2010, 12:55 PM
The French word for raedler is "panache". It's a pretty common drink in Western Europe - but, oddly enough, not in Czech Republic (the birthplace of modern beer).

Paul le Fou
05-11-2010, 07:30 AM
In England, the lemonade-beer mix is called a Shandy. Or at least that's what my English coworkers called it when they introduced me to it. It's pretty refreshing on a hot day, I'll give it that but no more

Also, I just found out that the mall/grocery store across the street from my girlfriend's house has an import beer section. Leffe brown, red, and blonde; duvel and orval, and more! Except none of the ones I had tasted quite so good as I know belgian beer can be. I wonder if it was because it's been a long time or I ate them with weird foods or maybe I got unlucky with bad brands or maybe the bottles had gone bad. I'll simply have to try more to find out. But at least I know that's an option to me!

ajr82
05-13-2010, 09:48 PM
Half Pints Brewing Co. (http://www.halfpintsbrewing.com/), the only locally-owned brewery in the city, puts out an excellent line of beers. Lately, I'm really taken with their "Weizen Heimer", a really good Hefeweizen. I'm a big fan of wheat beers, and this is one of the best I've had.

Kirin
06-17-2010, 01:03 PM
While in Budapest recently, I had some Krusovice Cerne from the Czech Republic. It was pretty darn good. Also discovered I can drink Dreher Bak, which is the Bock offering from one of the main local Slovak breweries. Overall, though, eastern Europe doesn't seem to have discovered dark beers (they almost entirely stick with pilsners, IPAs, lagers, and some light wheat beers), which is a shame because that's pretty much all I drink.

ravinoff
06-17-2010, 05:40 PM
I'm currently drinking a Samuel Smith's Oatmeal Stout. Oatmeal Stouts and Imperial Stouts (which are very different) are the best stouts.

I'm sorry Guinness, you just don't measure up.

StriderDL
06-17-2010, 06:59 PM
Yeah, Guinness is easily my least favorite stout. It's still good, of course, but lacks the complexity offered by oatmeal, imperial, and milk stouts. Mmm, stout. That reminds me, I still have a homebrew bottle of brown sugar stout kicking around...

ringworm
06-17-2010, 07:10 PM
Guinness is a fine fallback beer for places that don't have anything decent.

I've heard it's different (and much better) if you go to the source though.

fumner
06-17-2010, 11:12 PM
I just drank an Alpine Great (a bourbon barrel aged barleywine) to celebrate the Lakers championship. It was stellar.

RE: stouts

Guiness is good for its style, but I agree that imperial stouts are superior. So, some great stouts: Surly Darkness, 3 Floyd's Darklord, Stone IRS, Bruery's Black Tuesday, and Alesmith's Speedway Stout.

Ethan
06-18-2010, 05:43 AM
My roommate always picks up this oatmeal stout (http://www.mcauslan.com/en/ourbeers/sta_stout.htm) from McAuslan Brewery when we're at Hopleaf, and I always steal a few sips. Pretty great.

taidan
06-18-2010, 08:09 AM
copper lager

This I have to try.

Patrick
06-18-2010, 09:55 AM
Goose Island has a Maple Bacon Stout... that comes with a piece of bacon. It's extremely good.

taidan
06-18-2010, 11:47 AM
Not obscure, but I'm impressed with Magic Hat's summer IPA. It's hoppy of course, but very drinkable, rather than feeling like someone is trying to punch you in the mouth.

Dampe
06-18-2010, 12:20 PM
I tried Ninkasi's Total Domination IPA last week and it is now my favorite IPA. Way better than New Belgium's Ranger which was extremely disappointing.

Ethan
06-18-2010, 12:25 PM
A couple weeks ago I was at the Publican and I had a Hitachino Red Rice beer. It had an odd, gamey, kind of repulsive essence that I couldn't put my finger on. My friend tried it and said it tasted like blood sausage, and I realized that that was exactly it. It had a powerful iron taste, like somebody bled in it profusely. I had trouble finishing it, and had to force myself to choke it down to move onto the next beer. I will eat and enjoy almost any food, but blood is the one flavor I just can't seem to get past — not the idea of it, but that metallic overtone. Incidentally, my friend thought it tasted great.

SlimJimm
06-18-2010, 08:25 PM
I have recently become a big fan of Blue Moon. The orange slice most places put in there makes it even better.

StriderDL
06-19-2010, 10:15 AM
Blue Moon is very nice in the summer months. If you like that big orange flavor might I suggest Shock Top? I find it to have even more orange flavor than Blue Moon.

Dadgum Roi
06-19-2010, 01:38 PM
A good hefeweizen would be a good way to scratch that itch as well, they should have citrus notes to them.

Ethan
06-19-2010, 02:00 PM
Yes. If you enjoy Blue Moon, try to find Hacker-Pschorr.

Alixsar
06-19-2010, 02:32 PM
I have recently become a big fan of Blue Moon. The orange slice most places put in there makes it even better.

I don't know why people use oranges. I prefer lemon, but most places use orange.

Last night I had some Stella Artois. Stella's always been a favorite of mine, but I haven't had it in a while. IT IS SO GOOD

Paul le Fou
06-20-2010, 02:10 AM
Yeah, Blue Moon (or Killian's) are my go-tos when I'm at, say, your average neighborhood bar or applebee's. They're not fantastic beers, but they're the best widely-distributed ones I've found in reg'lar-old-places.

Dadgum Roi
06-20-2010, 04:15 AM
Yeah, Blue Moon (or Killian's) are my go-tos when I'm at, say, your average neighborhood bar or applebee's. They're not fantastic beers, but they're the best widely-distributed ones I've found in reg'lar-old-places.

This would be Yuengling for me. It's also my go-to hot-as-fuck-outside beer.

Kirin
06-20-2010, 10:53 AM
Goose Island has a Maple Bacon Stout... that comes with a piece of bacon. It's extremely good.

Speaking of weird beers, at a brew-pub in Vienna, I had some chile beer. As in, flavored with Jalapeno. And not just a little flavor, we're talking kick you in the face and clear your sinuses. It was... something. Not something I'd drink for relaxation, to be sure (I actually ordered it on a dare from my wife) but I did finish the glass and it really wasn't bad.

The one I actually like there, though, was the Rauchbier, i.e. smoked beer. I think they smoke the malts? It was tasty.

teekun
06-21-2010, 12:10 AM
Last night I drank about a liter and a half of Schöfferhofer Hefeweizen and it was glorious.

Paul le Fou
06-21-2010, 05:51 AM
I had a rauchbier (smoke beer). It tasted like fucking sausage.

To this day I don't know whether this was a good thing or a bad thing.

Little Young Dirty Jones
06-21-2010, 08:13 PM
My current favorites, both highly recommended:

Belhaven Scottish Ale (this is to Guiness what blondies are to brownies)
Trois Pistoles (simply epic dark ale, that's all I can say)

Kishi
06-21-2010, 08:53 PM
All beer tastes bad. If someone made a beer that tasted good, that person would make a million dollars!

Little Young Dirty Jones
06-21-2010, 09:10 PM
All beer tastes bad. If someone made a beer that tasted good, that person would make a million dollars!

Peche Lambic.

Thank me later.

ravinoff
06-21-2010, 10:13 PM
If someone made a beer that tasted good, that person would make a million dollars!

People have already done this actually! Both the making a good beer part and the making a million dollars part! The ones who make really good beer tend to use that money to make more good beer.

Of course to be fair much more people have made much more money off bad bland/boring beer.

ringworm
06-22-2010, 12:09 AM
I had a rauchbier (smoke beer). It tasted like fucking sausage.
I have never had a smoke that I've cared for.

All beer tastes bad. If someone made a beer that tasted good, that person would make a million dollars!
I used to say this. I hated beer. Then someone found a beer for me that I liked and it opened the door. I have seen this process repeated over a dozen times with people like yourself. The trick is finding it. Lambics are that beer at least half of the time (especially with ladies), but it could be anything from a creamy espresso stout to a simple summery wheat beer. The beer that got me was a Double IPA.

Paul le Fou
06-22-2010, 03:14 AM
See, I for one am just assuming that Kishi is joking or possibly referencing something, so I won't jump in with a diatribe about the pervasiveness of shitty beer or list ones he should go try.

On a different tangent, I hesitate to recommend or include lambics to anyone because they're specialty beers and not representative of basically anything but other lambics. And even then you have all those fruit flavors which aren't gonna be that similar.

Kishi
06-22-2010, 03:57 AM
I put it lightly because I know it's an unpopular opinion, but I mean it. If I can taste alcohol in something, it does not taste good to me. And I'm apparently very good at picking it out of drinks that other people tell me hide the flavor perfectly.

I'll always try something new, but I've never been anything but disappointed.

Dadgum Roi
06-22-2010, 06:04 AM
I used to say this. I hated beer. Then someone found a beer for me that I liked and it opened the door. I have seen this process repeated over a dozen times with people like yourself. The trick is finding it.

Yep. It's an "adult beverage" because you have to learn to appreciate it.

Kirin
06-22-2010, 08:14 AM
My current favorites, both highly recommended:

Belhaven Scottish Ale (this is to Guiness what blondies are to brownies)
Trois Pistoles (simply epic dark ale, that's all I can say)

I watn to try Belhaven's stout, but I can never find it anywhere. I'm not much into lighter Ales. Trois Pistoles is intriguing, though, since I've liked some black ales recently, I'll have to keep an eye out for that.

I used to say this. I hated beer. Then someone found a beer for me that I liked and it opened the door. I have seen this process repeated over a dozen times with people like yourself. The trick is finding it. Lambics are that beer at least half of the time (especially with ladies), but it could be anything from a creamy espresso stout to a simple summery wheat beer.

This is me exactly. I had never liked beer, then I discovered raspberry lambic and stuck to that for a while, then I got into chocolate and mocha stouts, and I've been expanding from there.

Dadgum Roi
06-22-2010, 08:50 AM
I'm not much into lighter Ales.

And you live here? Eek. I love dark, heavy beers, but I can't stand to drink them for most of the year- too damn hot. I can't stand walking outside into 100 degree temps/near 100% humidity and having a stomach full of stout. Yuck. December-February is dark beer season.

Kirin
06-22-2010, 10:27 AM
Yeah, well. This was also a problem in Budapest where it was 95 and sunny, but what can ya do. There's always the lambics. And there's some porters or black ales that are at least less heavy than a stout.

Actually, if I really want a hot-weather beer, I can deal with radlers and their ilk (beer mixed with lemonade or citrus soda or what have you).

But yeah I just don't like the vast majority of light beers on their own. IPAs are too hoppy and most of the rest just seem kinda sour for my taste.

pence
06-22-2010, 10:42 AM
Not obscure, but I'm impressed with Magic Hat's summer IPA. It's hoppy of course, but very drinkable, rather than feeling like someone is trying to punch you in the mouth.

Just responding to eulogize Magic Hat Hocus Pocus, one of the few Magic Hat brews where I wanted more after trying the bottle.

Whatever your new summer beer is, Magic Hat, it is no Hocus Pocus.

Dadgum Roi
06-22-2010, 10:45 AM
Yeah, well. This was also a problem in Budapest where it was 95 and sunny, but what can ya do. There's always the lambics. And there's some porters or black ales that are at least less heavy than a stout.

Actually, if I really want a hot-weather beer, I can deal with radlers and their ilk (beer mixed with lemonade or citrus soda or what have you).

But yeah I just don't like the vast majority of light beers on their own. IPAs are too hoppy and most of the rest just seem kinda sour for my taste.

Yuengling is my go-to most of the time, especially when it's hot and I'm outside and super especially if I am standing over some meats that are being cooked by flames and metal grates.

MCBanjoMike
06-22-2010, 10:58 AM
I played a gig at the McAuslin breweries this weekend, home of my favorite beer ever: St-Ambroise Pale Ale. Got comped a few beer tickets, too, but I was too tired to make the most of them. Still, their apricot wheat ale is a hell of a nice drink for a hot summer's day.

Also, I learned something that totally floored me - the on-tap-only Cream Ale that McAuslin makes is apparently the exact same beer as the Pale Ale, only with different carbonation. Amazing!

pence
06-22-2010, 11:01 AM
Yuengling is my go-to most of the time, especially when it's hot and I'm outside and super especially if I am standing over some meats that are being cooked by flames and metal grates.

Seconded. Yuengling is a good meat and potatoes beer, and it has the benefit of being local to where I live. Victory is even closer, but I need some spicy food to really enjoy HopDevil.

Tomm Guycot
06-22-2010, 12:36 PM
I don't always drink beer, but when I do... I drink Star Brno.

Silver
06-23-2010, 07:10 PM
Blue Moon's excellent, though lately I've found that I enjoy it more without the orange peel. Shock Top's alright but I feel that it might be *too* carbonated.

I tried dogfish head's 90 IPA - man that stuff is downright tasty. It's a little stronger than most at 9%, so if you're a light drinker expect to only need one. I've been on an Abida Amber kick lately - the stuff's out of Louisiana and it's so incredibly smooth and tasty. It introduced me to ambers, one of my new favorite styles (stuff like fat tire is great too). I still enjoy abida the most.

I'm having a sam adams boston lager right now with pizza. Marriage made in heaven. Sam Adams has to be my favorite mass produced beer out there - it has just enough complexity; a lightly bitterness followed by sweetness and good hop presence. Extremely refreshing without being overly light or boring at all. I'd take it over just about any macro out there.

ringworm
06-23-2010, 07:41 PM
I tried dogfish head's 90 IPA - man that stuff is downright tasty.
I've been wanting to try the 90 minute for awhile now, but Dogfish Head doesn't distribute in MN, I'd have to hop over to Wisconsin for it.

Tried Mikkeller's Hoppy Easter IPA (also known as Drikkeriget GIPA) last night and it was really, really great. Very smooth, very drinkable.

Also really like Odell's IPA, picked a 6-pack up on the recommendation of a friend, and it is very nice.

taidan
06-23-2010, 08:44 PM
I finished the Magic Hat summer sampler pack. That IPA was good to the end, and Number Nine is still good in small doses (too sweet to drink all season). Their actual summer ale was a surprise as well. Pours a wonderful red color.

Tonight I had some Otter Creek Copper Ale, which turned out well. I had a copper ale from some microbrewery in Colorado that I wasn't a fan of, but Otter's was quite a bit different. A bit sweeter and more malty.

Having grown up in PA and living now in MD, Yuengling is an inescapable mainstay, and has become my own mainstay as well. My roomate bought a kegerator when we moved in in '07, and Yuengling kegs have been in there more than anything else (and they're cheap too!)

We once had a keg of Blue Moon that was unwisely bought in the fall. By winter time it tasted like carbonated orange juice.

I've also found that I'm waning on Sam Adams Summer Ale. It was one of my first wheat ales, but I've found others since that tickle my fancy more. I also tried their summer sampler this month, and their new IPA wasn't too bad.

Dogfish Head 90 minute IPA is a wonderful brew. As for 120 minute ... it's an experience to be sure. The one time I had it, it was on Halloween night (while I watched Halloween). It's almost a dessert by itself (and cost $10 a bottle).

Vega
08-05-2010, 11:03 AM
I live outside Fort Lauderdale, FL. There's a big liquor store near me that I've browsed through but only bought a couple Sam Adams from so far. I'll have to try some of you guys' recommendations.

Is it OK to like fruity light beers sometimes? I like them better than plain light beer because plain light beer just seems to wish it was real beer, but fruity light beers do their own thing.

MCBanjoMike
08-05-2010, 11:15 AM
Taidan, if you're drinking beers from the Northeast, see if you can get your hands on something from Smuttynose. My friend had a keg of their brown ale (I'm assuming it was the Old Brown Dog) and I thought it was quite good. Then again, I've never been a huge fan of Otter Creek, aside from their mascot. So adorable.

Ethan
08-05-2010, 11:21 AM
Is it OK to like fruity light beers sometimes?

No. I know this forum is all about inclusiveness, but light macros with artificial fruit flavoring are not acceptable.

There are plenty of real beers that are light and refreshing without being "light" or having anything in common with Kool-Aid. You should try a crisp Czech pilsener like Staropramen, or a Berliner lager like Jever.

Dadgum Roi
08-05-2010, 11:55 AM
No. I know this forum is all about inclusiveness, but light macros with artificial fruit flavoring are not acceptable.


I've never even heard of this. I thought he was talking about lambics.

Yuengling is my go-to "refreshing beer". Cheap, tasty, and light.

MCBanjoMike
08-05-2010, 12:06 PM
I refuse to dislike McAuslin Apricot Wheat Beer and you can't make me.

Unless the "light" part of that statement meant "lite", as in calorie-reduced. No one should be allowed to drink those ever.

Kirin
08-05-2010, 12:17 PM
I'm all for disparaging terrible artificial fruit flavors, but let's make sure we're not lumping in beers brewed with actual fruit, here. Those can be pretty awesome.

Paul le Fou
08-05-2010, 07:18 PM
I don't know if it's real or artificially flavored, but there was a blueberry ale I tried a while back from... someone. It was actually on tap at a restaurant my friends and I liked to go to. It tasted exactly like a blueberry muffin. It was delicious.

Really didn't like the "banana bread" beer though.

I'm starting to forget what real beer tastes like. I... I feel weak. In my soul.

Marfy
08-05-2010, 09:52 PM
A local brewery makes a blueberry beer - I forget it specifically beyond fucking gross. It tastes like stale Skittles.

Sam Adams Blackberry Witterbeer is surprisingly good for Sam Adams.

Kirin
08-06-2010, 08:22 AM
I recently discovered that one of the local breweries down here (Big Boss) does a season Raspberry Black Ale, which I *must* track down now. Probably going to visit the source come winter.

Meanwhile, last night at the awesome Flying Saucer bar in Raleigh, I tried another beer that I quite liked: Left Hand Nitro Milk Stout. Goes down smooooove. My wife says it's cause they somehow use nitrogren for the bubbles? I have no idea how that can even work, chemically, but the resulting beer is good stuff.

Daikaiju
08-07-2010, 02:07 PM
By the by, Kirin,

Have you sampled your namesake?

Kirin
08-09-2010, 09:01 AM
It's a pretty bog-standard beery-beer, as far as I can tell, so I'm not particularly fond of it. As I've said elsewhere in the thread, I pretty much stick to stouts, porters, bocks, and lambics, though I'm willing to try anything that's not dominated by hoppiness.

(And as I've also mentioned in other threads, people thinking I'm named after the beer is one of the downsides of this handle, but I've been using it for way too long to leave it.)

Paul le Fou
08-09-2010, 09:17 AM
I went to a bar with a belgian beer far in progress. One Duchess de Bourgogne and on Gouden Carolus Classic later, I remember how to love again.

Daikaiju
08-11-2010, 09:07 PM
My dad really favors belgian dessert beers when he can get them. If it's fruit flavored and involving berries, he is there.

Ethan
08-11-2010, 11:47 PM
There are many good beers brewed with fruit, but when someone tells me they don't much like beer except fruit beers, that makes me think of some mass market artificial crap like Bud Light Lime or Leinenkugel Summer Shandy. Those are unacceptable. Lambics and other beers that actually use fruit in the fermentation are A-OK.

Patrick
08-12-2010, 09:13 AM
I have a few friends who don't like beer, but I've never met anyone who doesn't like a Lambic. It's generally the way I get people interested in beer.

Elements
08-16-2010, 01:03 PM
Hmm, when I first started with beers, I thought they were all nasty, and "piss water" was a very accurate description for it. Of course, that's because everyone was feeding me only Bud Light, Coors Light, et cetera. One of my friends gave me a Colt 45 one day, and I finally had a beer I could stand, oddly enough. I then proceeded through a prolonged malt liquor phase, of stuff like Mickey's, 211, Hurricane... which I realize now makes me just sound like a desperate alcoholic trying to get the most bang for my buck, but I knew nothing about it then. All the basics still just taste like piss water to me.

I eventually branched out more, and the main ones I hit up now, mood dependent, are Killian's, St. Pauli's Girl, Newcastle (rare for me to want one that dark), and my mainstay's become Stella Artois. I still get a can of 211 now and then to start off drink night, mainly for nostalgia. Also, on a side note... Blue Moon is the only beer I've ever thrown out. My bud that got me hooked on malt liquors also found it undrinkable. *shrug*

Kirin
08-17-2010, 12:07 PM
This weekend I was at an awesome bar down south of Wilmington NC, the Fat Pelican. The way it works is they have this big walk-in fridge, with several dozen floor-to-ceiling shelves full of a huge variety of beer. You pick some up, bring it back to the counter, they open it for you, take your money, and hand it back.

Anyway, this time I had to try Charkoota Rye (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/335/47050), a smoked doppelbock from New Holland. It was... odd. The smoke wasn't as strong as some of the German rauchbeers, but it did uncannily remind me of barbecue. Which is kind of a strange thing while drinking beer. I was unsure at first, but it grew on me. Not something I'll go seek out a lot, but an interesting experience anyway.

Vega
08-17-2010, 05:26 PM
I suppose this is a heresy, but since light can make a beer go bad, can canning help beer stay good?

Paul le Fou
08-17-2010, 07:18 PM
I suppose this is a heresy, but since light can make a beer go bad, can canning help beer stay good?

I do think it can help the beer stay good longer, but it also makes it taste like a can.

Beer bottle glass is brown specifically to block light and help it stay fresh longer. Unless you're keeping your beer on your backyard patio table, freshness isn't really a reason to go with canning.

Kirin
08-18-2010, 11:25 AM
For some reason, I hear that Young's Double Chocolate Stout is better in the canned version than the bottled ones. No idea why. They do use those werid but effective instant-head generating plastic doohickies in the cans, which may have something to do with it.

ringworm
08-18-2010, 12:16 PM
Can technology is such today that it is completely irrational to believe that the beer in them will taste like metal. More and more awesome craft breweries are using cans instead of bottles.

That isn't to say cans are better than bottles, but I don't think you can say any longer that bottles are better than cans, except for aesthetics.

Paul le Fou
08-18-2010, 05:57 PM
Sounds reasonable. I haven't been keeping up on cans, and it's probably just old prejudice/association from most can beers already being crappy. But yeah, I had noticed more beers coming in cans. Anchor Steam and Fat Tire come to mind.

I do find that can beer is usually colder than bottled, which can be a plus in summer.

Dadgum Roi
08-18-2010, 06:22 PM
I alternate between canned and bottled Yuengling depending on what's on sale, and the canned stuff definitely has a metallic taste to it.

estragon
08-18-2010, 07:46 PM
That isn't to say cans are better than bottles, but I don't think you can say any longer that bottles are better than cans, except for aesthetics.

Maybe this is irrational nonsense, but I think that in general liquids taste better in glass. Can you think of anything you'd rather drink out of a plastic/metal cup over a nice glass cup? I sure can't.

StrawberryChrist
08-18-2010, 08:44 PM
Drinking beer from a plastic cup is the worst thing in the history of things.

Sir Sly Ry
08-18-2010, 09:01 PM
Ohhhh it's not that bad. It's not like beer is STORED in that. But the experience is more enjoyable out of glass for sure.

Someone recently mentioned having to throw out a Blue Moon; I don't blame you, I can't drink that stuff any more either. But for a Belgian White that is actually good, try Hoegaarden. I like that! You have to pour it into a glass though, straight from the bottle is no good.

Elements
08-19-2010, 01:47 AM
But for a Belgian White that is actually good, try Hoegaarden. I like that! You have to pour it into a glass though, straight from the bottle is no good.

I will be sure to give it a try and let you know how it goes. :D

Alixsar
08-19-2010, 03:13 AM
Drinking beer from a plastic cup is the worst thing in the history of things.

It's not good but it's nowhere near as bad as you think it is.

Marfy
08-19-2010, 07:29 AM
I think the most appalling vessel I have ever consumed alcoholic beverages out of was a Strongbow can washed out (several times, trust me). I then poured vodka and whatever mixer we had in there. What can I say? I'm eco-friendly.

Patrick
08-19-2010, 10:29 AM
A local bar serves beer out of plastic pints. It tastes fine, but the lightness of the cups is bizarre, and I keep thinking it's emptier than it is. It feels like a soda cup at chuckie cheeze or something.

Sir Sly Ry
08-19-2010, 11:25 AM
I experienced plastic pints recently. Strange, but not bad necessarily.

Dadgum Roi
08-19-2010, 11:30 AM
A local bar serves beer out of plastic pints. It tastes fine, but the lightness of the cups is bizarre, and I keep thinking it's emptier than it is. It feels like a soda cup at chuckie cheeze or something.

Actually, you can get beer at CC's and it comes in a plastic cup. Best damn beer I ever had, too. :)

ringworm
08-19-2010, 11:36 AM
I alternate between canned and bottled Yuengling depending on what's on sale, and the canned stuff definitely has a metallic taste to it.
It's either in your head, or Yuengling uses out-of-date canning technologies. Neither would surprise me.

Steve
08-23-2010, 09:06 PM
I think the most appalling vessel I have ever consumed alcoholic beverages out of was a Strongbow can washed out (several times, trust me). I then poured vodka and whatever mixer we had in there. What can I say? I'm eco-friendly.

I am not proud of this, but some friends and I did this when we were camping one time. We had liquor and some canned sodas for mixers, but no cups. We'd drink some soda, pour some liquor in, then add some more once we'd gotten through the inevitable liquory layer that formed at the top of the can due to the lack of a viable mixing mechanism. Turns out that there's no really good way to judge the ratios when you're using an opaque container like that, and it's very easy to wind up drinking straight vodka out of a Sprite can like a dumbass, thinking that you're diluting it down. I think this is the only time in my life that I've actually been what you could call "falling-down drunk."

Kirin
08-24-2010, 10:14 AM
More new beer: picked up a bottle of Baltica porter from St. Petersburg, Russia. It was... ok? Had some weird ending notes but other than that was pretty unremarkable. Not something I'd seek out again, but hey, it was cheap, and I like trying dark beers from different places.

MCBanjoMike
08-24-2010, 02:42 PM
The good: going to a party tonight in a great outdoor space, and it's BYOB!

The bad: because of potential problems with broken glass, only canned beer is allowed on site. There is very little good canned beer available for purchase in Quebec! I wish I could get to an LCBO to buy some Old Speckled Hen, that would be boss. As it is, I'll probably settle for a four-pack of Boddington's...if I can find a place around here that sells it.

Calorie Mate
08-24-2010, 03:07 PM
Put some wine into a soda can and drink that.

Posaune
08-24-2010, 04:10 PM
Tiny keg.

ringworm
08-24-2010, 04:12 PM
Put some wine into a soda can and drink that.

Steve
08-24-2010, 06:03 PM
More new beer: picked up a bottle of Baltica porter from St. Petersburg, Russia. It was... ok? Had some weird ending notes but other than that was pretty unremarkable. Not something I'd seek out again, but hey, it was cheap, and I like trying dark beers from different places.

I've had the Baltika 7, which, if memory serves, is a lager of pretty similar description: not bad, really, but not great either. I have some co-workers who travel to Russia fairly frequently who swear by the Baltika 9, but I have no experience with that one.

Kirin
08-27-2010, 09:39 AM
I'm now three-in-a-row for trying new beers that I think are just kind of okay! Last night's experiment: Dixie Blackened Voodoo Lager (http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/404/1186/).

It's a decent lager. Not incredibly exciting. Got some interesting after-tastes going on. About the best thing everyone seems to say about it is that it has high "drinkability" for a dark beer. Which I guess is good, since I had to buy a six-pack to try it. Fairly inexpensive, though, so I don't feel like I'm wasting money.


Speaking of cheap, I was reading a description of a Porter that sounded really inviting... but, it was from Michelob. I'm wondering, can this possibly actually be good? I dunno. Didn't buy it. But it comes to like $1/bottle in a six-pack...

Patrick
08-27-2010, 10:22 AM
Goose Island and some other local breweries are putting on a Belgian Fest this weekend. It's $25 for 20 beer tickets, and I can get in an hour early because I have an MBA (Goose's customer appreciation thing).

I don't know if I have $25 to spare right now though. It would probably be worth it thoguh, so I'm strongly considering it.

Kirin
10-04-2010, 09:08 AM
It's fall! Let's talk seasonal beers.

My all-time favorite local seasonal brew: Big Boss Harvest Time. So good.

Second tier: Dogfish Head Punkin Ale. Shipyard Pumpkinhead. Both good but a little on the light side for my personal taste.

New thing I just tried that was pretty great: Roth Brewing Forgotten Hollow Cinnamon Porter. Super cinnamony, which is weird, but tasty.

You guys got any seasonal favorites?


(Next up I'm waiting for Big Boss' Aces & Ates Coffee Stout, which should be out in another month or so.)

Ethan
10-04-2010, 08:01 PM
I've had the Baltika 7, which, if memory serves, is a lager of pretty similar description: not bad, really, but not great either. I have some co-workers who travel to Russia fairly frequently who swear by the Baltika 9, but I have no experience with that one.

Baltika 9 is a sickly-sweet malt liquor of soda-like consistency and rot-like taste. It comes in a giant plastic bottle that screams, "Hey, homeless vagrants! I'm the cheapest buzz on the rack!" It's one of the grossest beverages I've ever tasted. Your friends who recommended it should be put before a firing squad.

Patrick
10-04-2010, 08:42 PM
Yesterday I had a Sierra Nevada barley wine that was quite good, and today I found out that a local bar/BBQ place has victory golden monkey on tap, which is a phenomenal beer. A lot of places in my neighborhood have been stepping up their craft-beer-on-tap game recently.