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Rosencrantz
01-20-2010, 11:14 PM
I admit it: I'm a picky eater. Always have been. I like a much smaller and, frankly, more boring selection of food compared to most people, but I love it and have no problem eating what I like day in and day out.

Of course, the biggest problem is when I go over to someone else's house and they only offer stuff I don't like. I'm very polite, though, and I will always try something, even if I know I won't like it. (With one exception -- even the smell of macaroni and cheese is enough to make me nauseous.) Here's something weird: I would say that my favorite food is french fries... but I can't stand mashed potatoes. Or really, any other kind of potatoes apart from, say, wedges. And even then, I would want them cooked very thoroughly and with lots of ketchup. Of course, almost everyone loves mashed potatoes, and it seems to be a staple no matter where I visit. If I'm not extremely close with the people, then I won't say anything and politely accept a small amount, and like I said, I will always try it. I keep expecting to one day find that my tastebuds have changed, or that this time it'll be a magical, delicious, recipe, but no... I never like it.

Luckily for me, my wife is also a very picky eater. We're similar in most ways, except that she LOVES potatoes and HATES anything with fruit flavor - artificial or otherwise. (I loooove fruit and fruit-flavored candy and so on.)

I've mentioned it in another thread, but Thanksgiving is really rough on me, because just about the only thing I actually like is the turkey. To make matters worse, I always celebrate Thanksgiving twice in one day -- first at the in-law's, then with one of my parents. Speaking of turkey, one thing I love that not a lot of other people do is turkey products, such as turkey burgers, turkey dogs, and turkey bacon. I've given up on ordering turkey burgers from restaurants, though. They're always dry, bland, and sometimes overdone. Jennie-O frozen turkey burgers are excellent, though, and homemade ones are even better... but I still have to perfect my dad's cooking method for those.

Dawnswalker
01-20-2010, 11:17 PM
I hate tomatoes, but I love ketchup.

mopinks
01-20-2010, 11:23 PM
I am the anti-picky eater. if something is edible, I will probably eat it.

the only common everyday food I really just can't stand is coconut. I am physically unable to even swallow it, and the texture grosses me out beyond words. but I still sometimes enjoy stuff with coconut milk in it, so go figure!

rockintomordor
01-20-2010, 11:27 PM
I hate tomatoes, but I love ketchup.

100%

Brickroad
01-21-2010, 12:07 AM
I love tomatoes, but I hate ketchup.

Fix'd.

Lucas
01-21-2010, 01:16 AM
I am a pretty danged picky eater too. Part of it is personal matters; I don't like the taste of yams or the texture of rice and a lot of cooked vegetables, for instance. A lot of things I don't eat have more to do with health matters though. Can't eat foods with a lot of acid or caffeine because of heartburn, spicy foods make me nauseous, I'm kind of lactose intolerant, plenty of vegetables and nuts make my mouth itch and my throat feels like it's closing, etc.

The worst is onions. Even one of those little tiny chunks of diced onions on a cheap burger will make me retch and have to spit out what I'm eating if I bite into it. Watching someone eat onion rings can make me queasy. Onion powder used as a seasoning doesn't bother me though, for some reason.

I'm with Rosencrantz on loving turkey meat though. Thanksgiving dinner, bacon, Thanksgiving leftovers, burgers, it's all delicious.

Wolfgang
01-21-2010, 01:28 AM
I hate tomatoes, but I love ketchup.

Oddly this is common. I love tomato everything except actual whole tomatoes and tomato juice. Ketchup, sauce, soup, etc. is all faayyyyn-sastic.

Oh and I loooooooove coconut.

shivam
01-21-2010, 01:30 AM
i hated tomatoes till i went to italy, and realised what real tomatoes tasted like. turns out we in the states are Doing It Wrong.

Lumber Baron
01-21-2010, 01:35 AM
It's not that I don't like tomatoes, it's just I don't think they add much substantial to dishes. They're used in stuff I adore, tomato basil soup, salsa, pizza sauces, but unadorned tomato just takes up space for me. I'll take them off my sandwiches.

Eggs, on the other hand. Screw those guys.
The worst is onions. Even one of those little tiny chunks of diced onions on a cheap burger will make me retch and have to spit out what I'm eating if I bite into it. Watching someone eat onion rings can make me queasy. Onion powder used as a seasoning doesn't bother me though, for some reason.
I eat onions raw. Well, I did back when I was a kid and wasn't concerned with how that affected my social status. Salt and ground pepper on a Vidalia; ain't nothing wrong with that.

Wolfgang
01-21-2010, 01:51 AM
Salt and ground pepper on a Vidalia; ain't nothing wrong with that.

augh aackpth ppthhhhhtttt

NevznachaY
01-21-2010, 06:09 AM
Being a picky eater is boring.

Dadgum Roi
01-21-2010, 06:26 AM
augh aackpth ppthhhhhtttt

Vidalias are basically meant to be eaten raw, though. Different taste than a regular onion.

Anyway, picky-ness. I was a really picky eater until I went overseas in my late teens and was forced to eat lots of strange food, often of dubious provenance. I came back willing to eat just about anything. I feel like pickiness is something you ought to strive to overcome.

Kirin
01-21-2010, 09:10 AM
I'm in the "no tomato chunks any bigger than 'finely diced' camp" as well. I love onions, though. Especially carmelized. Mmm-mmm.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 09:14 AM
i hated tomatoes till i went to italy, and realised what real tomatoes tasted like. turns out we in the states are Doing It Wrong.

This, except I didn't hate American tomatoes before visiting Italy. I just suddenly started hating them afterward.

I have an incredible aversion to iceberg lettuce. Everyone tells me it tastes like nothing. To me, it has a taste and that taste is so gross.

Also, I have trouble with raw bell peppers, and I tend to not like green peppers even when they're cooked. I love roasted red peppers, though.

I have celery issues.

Red Hedgehog
01-21-2010, 10:29 AM
I hate ketchup, but I love tomatoes.

There.

Calorie Mate
01-21-2010, 11:21 AM
I hate a lot of vegetables. I'm trying, but some of 'em - carrots and zuchini in particular - I don't think I'll ever be able to hang with. It makes me sad, because they're good for me and in a lot of things I otherwise like.

Being a picky eater is boring.

It's true! I used to be way, way worse, but college helped turn it around a lot.

spineshark
01-21-2010, 12:34 PM
I have an incredible aversion to iceberg lettuce. Everyone tells me it tastes like nothing. To me, it has a taste and that taste is so gross.
Yeah, it's bitter. I still don't hate it, but it's about the worst kind of lettuce I can think of.

I love raw diced tomatoes, even pretty bad ones like the unripe stuff you get at a lot of Mexican restaurants. Cooking tomatoes into other dishes (especially stir-fry) tends to gross me out though. I'm glad most Chinese, etc. restaurants don't use them much.

Wolfgang
01-21-2010, 12:47 PM
I hate a lot of vegetables. I'm trying, but some of 'em - carrots and zuchini in particular - I don't think I'll ever be able to hang with. It makes me sad, because they're good for me and in a lot of things I otherwise like.

I don't like carrot carrots, but I love baby carrots. They're super super sweet and crisp rather than being... root-y.

And as far as vidalia onions: yeah, I know they're usually meant to be consumed raw, but there's such a thing as having too much onion in your mouth at any given time. Thinking about eating one like an apple makes my stomach acid get all antsy in the pantsy.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 01:03 PM
i hated tomatoes till i went to italy, and realised what real tomatoes tasted like. turns out we in the states are Doing It Wrong.

We have heirloom tomatoes though! Also growing your own is pretty easy!

RE: Picky Eaters

I hate them! At least all the ones I know... The wife and I like to have dinner parties, we like to have friends over and eat, drink, and be merry. As good hosts we ask if there are things they won't eat and they all say, We'll eat anything. Inevitably when it comes down to eating it comes out that something, something, on the menu is inedible to them. And, now they have to tell everyone how inedible it is to them! I can't tell you how incredibly rude it is to be offered food by someone and to not eat it! In many countries this is a grave insult to the host. Compound that by not telling the host that there actually is something you won't eat. Makes me want to wring necks.

Furthermore, the picky eater road apparently doesn't go both ways. I have to cut out eggs, beef, tomatoes, cheese, or whatever it is you say you can't/won't eat when you come over to my place but when I go over to yours you don't provide me with the food I love to eat. Next time a veggie or vegan asks me over to their house for dinner I'm going to tell them I require meat to be on the menu. I have to put tofu on mine for them, they can do the same for me.


RANT OFF

Gwrrrk
01-21-2010, 01:04 PM
I'm not a picky eater. I'll eat anything except for crustaceans.

However my GF is mostly vegetarian AND she is a picky eater on top of that. It gets hella annoying sometimes.

Sheana
01-21-2010, 01:29 PM
Oh man, I'm so picky. I'm happy with so many bland and uninteresting foods, and am very sensitive to spices and heat. I'm usually game and will try things at least once, but I don't always like it in the end.

I have a weird relationship with tomatoes. On the one hand, I really like plain tomato sauce with no chunks of anything in it as part of an Italian dish, like lasagna or bolognese or whatnot. I'm indifferent to ketchup, sometimes it's okay. But otherwise, I greatly dislike tomatoes. Hell, when I have pizza I either get it "white" or with as light amount of sauce as possible. I don't even like fresh tomato chunks in my salad, and the one time I was convinced to try a sort of stewed/baked tomato dish I got nauseous and gagged.

The worst food of all is asparagus, however. Everything about it is completely horrible and there is not a single preperation of it out there that doesn't make me gag. It is the Worst Vegetable.

Coinspinner
01-21-2010, 01:46 PM
I cannot bite into or chew fresh/uncooked fruit or vegetables. Dried fruit are no problem. Chunks of tomato in my tomato sauce are no problem but a tomato in a hamburger is impossible.

I can't stand arroz con pollo, picadillo or flan either, and all are standard foods at family gatherings in my family.

Red Hedgehog
01-21-2010, 01:49 PM
Man, I love your rant falselogic. Picky eaters are just awful.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 01:58 PM
I could subsist on asparagus for the rest of my life – preferably with olive oil, rosemary, vinegar, and a little bit of sea salt and black pepper.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 02:01 PM
I could subsist on asparagus for the rest of my life – preferably with olive oil, rosemary, vinegar, and a little bit of sea salt and black pepper.

It is especially delicious wrapped in bacon or in risotto!

shivam
01-21-2010, 02:03 PM
Furthermore, the picky eater road apparently doesn't go both ways. I have to cut out eggs, beef, tomatoes, cheese, or whatever it is you say you can't/won't eat when you come over to my place but when I go over to yours you don't provide me with the food I love to eat. Next time a veggie or vegan asks me over to their house for dinner I'm going to tell them I require meat to be on the menu. I have to put tofu on mine for them, they can do the same for me.


RANT OFF

that is horseshit. If you're a meat eater, you lose nothing by having a random veggie dish during your meals. You too can partake in it, and it takes nothing away from your standard. For a vegetarian to add a meat dish is an incredibly huge decision involving ethics, religious choices, and a whole host of other issues. Moreover, you can eat anything without compunction, so a meal of vegetarian options is just fine. If you need flesh that badly, you can always go and get a burger later. If a vegetarian comes to a party and you offer him or her a pepperoni pizza and say, just take the meat off, you're an insensitve dick, and they're going hungry.

spineshark
01-21-2010, 02:04 PM
Man, I love your rant falselogic. Picky eaters are just awful.
Yeah, I try hard not to be anything beyond vegetarian, and no matter what, I'll definitely never complain. Since I don't have really strong convictions about being vegetarian, I'll even break if I the situation is between "eat meat" and "don't eat anything." But I also agree with shivam right there overall. Including and excluding ingredients is totally different.
I could subsist on asparagus for the rest of my life – preferably with olive oil, rosemary, vinegar, and a little bit of sea salt and black pepper.
Yeah, fresh asparagus is a great vegetable that's easy to prepare and goes well in a lot of things. I can see why it would be off-putting, but when it's in season I really enjoy working with it.

Bergasa
01-21-2010, 02:06 PM
My best friend is a bland and picky eater, and it gets pretty damn annoying (no disrespect to picky eaters!). He won't even try things, which irks me the most. You might like it!

shivam
01-21-2010, 02:07 PM
the thing about asparagus is that there are some people who are genetically predisposed to tasting a horrible chemical in the vegetable. Most of us don't have it, but for those few, it's pretty much ass.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 02:09 PM
Ultimately I'd like to think that my general adventurousness with food counterbalances my distaste for a few common things like iceberg lettuce and celery, and removes me from "picky eater" status. I've eaten bugs. I've eaten whale. I've eaten and loved all sorts of strange organ products. I've had those preserved duck eggs with brown "whites" and bluish-grey yolks. I love meat from the head of a steamed fish. I like stinky soybeans. My greatest regret from my day in Korea was that I didn't have silkwork larvae. In pho, the more tendon, the better. With oysters, the more alive and the more slimy, the better. I once ordered bún bò Huế specifically to force myself to overcome my dislike of blood cubes (it didn't work). If somebody told me that fried human shit was a Javanese delicacy, I might spend a moment considering it. I'm not picky, right?

But no iceberg. And no green bell peppers unless they're cooked into oblivion.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 02:09 PM
that is horseshit.

We can agree to disagree. How do you know I don't take my consumption of eating meat as seriously as they do not eating it? It's disingenious to assume vegans and such have thought about their decisions deeply and that I haven't thought about mine...

teg
01-21-2010, 02:12 PM
I am a shamefully picky eater. There's lots of things that I ddon't like, but the worst is seafood. If it lived in the water, I absolutely will not eat it.* I'm the only one of my friends who's never tried sushi.

One thing that I'm frequently surprised I like is ratatouille. I can't stand most of the ingredients individually, but I love the combination.

*exception: fish and chips, and then only rarely

NevznachaY
01-21-2010, 02:16 PM
I hate a lot of vegetables. I'm trying, but some of 'em - carrots and zuchini in particular - I don't think I'll ever be able to hang with. It makes me sad, because they're good for me and in a lot of things I otherwise like.

Ever had carrot chips? Yum.

Red Hedgehog
01-21-2010, 02:23 PM
I feel like there's a difference between vegetarianism and picky eating. Like, if there's an ethical decision behind not eating a food, I can respect that a lot more than just "not liking it."

Wolfgang
01-21-2010, 02:28 PM
celery

Oh man I love ants on a log.

On the one hand, Shivam is right in that it wouldn't hurt anyone to have a vegetable dish once in a while. On the other, falselogic is really just talking about reciprocal courtesy among friends. As someone who gets really picky about the more pungent kinds of vegetable... items... my veg/vegan friends like to make, it would be much nicer if there were more consideration on both sides.

Finding out what's going to be served beforehand is not a bad idea in making a decision as to whether you want to go, and there should be some kind of social contract that lets us get out of having to be courteous and eat something we find genuinely nasty just for appearances. Or at least being allowed to join in the company by bringing along something you like, which is why I'm a big fan of potluck over dinner parties. Inviting someone to dinner is a nice gesture that turns into a hostile act if the guest really doesn't like what's being served.

And yes, someone who likes meat can always grab a burger afterwards, just like a vegetarian can get a salad after. Or bring one!

I feel like there's a difference between vegetarianism and picky eating. Like, if there's an ethical decision behind not eating a food, I can respect that a lot more than just "not liking it."

Whereas I have the opposite view. People have differing tastes, and no amount of being willing is going to get me to like something I see as disgusting. I can understand this much more than I can someone not eating something, even though they want to, because of morality. Which isn't to say I oppose it, I just wouldn't do it myself.

Sheana
01-21-2010, 02:33 PM
Yeah, I agree with a lot of what's being said, because I also find that annoying. But I do make a point of trying new things or eating what's available, I'm not about to fuss. Often I won't be very fond of it, but I don't want to be rude, either.

With asparagus it's not just the taste, but the smell and texture as well. No matter how it's prepared there's always something about the texture that's really off-putting. This is a problem I have with a lot of foods actually, the texture of it can really ruin something for me. This is why I'm not fond of brown rice and certain types of pasta/bread.

I have a thing about fish, too. There's a few types I think are okay, but otherwise I just don't like it. My seafood love is relegated to things that come in shells and have too many legs.

Violentvixen
01-21-2010, 02:39 PM
the thing about asparagus is that there are some people who are genetically predisposed to tasting a horrible chemical in the vegetable. Most of us don't have it, but for those few, it's pretty much ass.

I'm one of the weirdos who can't taste the asparagine but can smell the weird compound in the urine. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1715705/?tool=pubmed)

shivam
01-21-2010, 02:41 PM
Oh man I love ants on a log.

On the one hand, Shivam is right in that it wouldn't hurt anyone to have a vegetable dish once in a while. On the other, falselogic is really just talking about reciprocal courtesy among friends. As someone who gets really picky about the more pungent kinds of vegetable... items... my veg/vegan friends like to make, it would be much nicer if there were more consideration on both sides.


See, i dont get this. If someone comes to my house, I go out of my way to make sure they leave full, even if they just stopped by for ten minutes. But you want me to go against my fundamental beliefs to prepare you a chicken or steak just because you offer me the salad you would have made anyway when i come to your house?

how does that make any sense?

Calorie Mate
01-21-2010, 02:53 PM
Guys, Shivam is right. Offering vegetarian alternatives has nothing to do with offering someone their absolute faovirte food (and thus, you can do the same) and has everything to do with offering them something they can eat. You can eat stuff vegetarians offer you, and if you can't (for allergies or hypothetical beliefs no one actually has), I'm sure they'd offer you something else. Asking them to make meat still means they'd have to deal with the meat, cook it, etc. - which is almost as bad as asking them to eat it. There's a reason they don't deal with it, and it really does make you an insensitive prick to suggest that.

On the other hand, Shawn isn't completely wrong in what he said - vegetarians should be thoughtful, too. I've been offered food by a vegetarian that was, like, hummus and carrots or something (two things that make me gag), and when I said I simply couldn't eat it, they shrugged their shoulders and basically said, "Oh well, you can eat when you get home then." That's rude, because they'd have a problem if I'd been eating a hot dog and did the same thing to them. Thankfully, Shivam (and most vegetarians) are not total dicks like that.

Also, you can tell you're upsetting Shivam because he's using correct punctuation! Look out!

Wolfgang
01-21-2010, 02:53 PM
See, i dont get this. If someone comes to my house, I go out of my way to make sure they leave full, even if they just stopped by for ten minutes. But you want me to go against my fundamental beliefs to prepare you a chicken or steak just because you offer me the salad you would have made anyway when i come to your house?


how does that make any sense?

Well, what if I don't like the thing you made to leave me full? How is it insulting to say, "no thanks, I'm good" and not have hard feelings on either side? And my saying "a salad" was just an example. When I threw my last BBQ, I made it clear that I was providing meat, and if anyone wanted to bring their own veggie options, they'd be welcome to. Because more than wanting them to eat the food I was preparing, I just wanted to share their company.

EDIT: I should mention that, in an ideal world, any guest will bring something with them to any given social function. I always make sure to do it, and a lot of my friends do as well, so expecting it isn't out of the ordinary.

Likewise, I wouldn't make a vegan prepare something special for me, I just would like it if vegans weren't openly insulted (as they usually are in my experience) if I want to possibly bring something I'm more likely to enjoy if the menu isn't to my taste. Simple!

shivam
01-21-2010, 03:09 PM
And i want to be clear that i'm not actually calling any of you guys dicks. I'm aware of how reality works, and know that if i'm invited to a steak house or a barbecue, i should just make a mental note to find something else to eat. It's incredibly bad manners to bitch after recieving an invitation, and my dietary choices are not your problem. But when i invite you to my house, which i am glad to do, I'd ask the same courtesy.

shivam
01-21-2010, 03:14 PM
We can agree to disagree. How do you know I don't take my consumption of eating meat as seriously as they do not eating it? It's disingenious to assume vegans and such have thought about their decisions deeply and that I haven't thought about mine...

you're gonna have to explain this one to me. What religious or ethical philosophy do you hold to that requires consumption of meat?

For me, I'm a Hindu, and a brahmin at that. Meat consumption is absolutely forbidden for my society, and is one of the fundamental concepts that i hold more dear than pretty much anything else, to the point that it makes up a large part of who I am. This does not hold true for all indians, or all hindus, but it certainly does for my community. I would not compromise this for anyone, under any circumstances, and it's never been a problem for anyone else. Sure, there have been times (like in japan) where i've had a really hard time trying to eat because of my beliefs, but for other people, it's only meant going to a restaurant with some more vegetarian options when we hang out, instead of hitting up the korean bbq.

NevznachaY
01-21-2010, 03:23 PM
For me, I'm a Hindu, and a brahmin at that.

This is absolutely off-topic, but I'm amazed at the fact that you (the general "you") still follow the rules of your caste even when not in India. I've always thought that it's a part of Indian society - not a religious practice.

THE MORE YOU KNOW picture would go here if I weren't so lazy.

Wolfgang
01-21-2010, 03:24 PM
And i want to be clear that i'm not actually calling any of you guys dicks. I'm aware of how reality works, and know that if i'm invited to a steak house or a barbecue, i should just make a mental note to find something else to eat.

Exactly. Likewise, that vegetarian place we hit up in Chinatown had some really good sesame tofu!

Dadgum Roi
01-21-2010, 03:25 PM
I feel like there's a difference between vegetarianism and picky eating. Like, if there's an ethical decision behind not eating a food, I can respect that a lot more than just "not liking it."

Ethics or no, you're categorically rejecting a lot of foods and creating all sorts of potentially sticky situations for yourself if you travel. I had a lot of vegetarian friends in South America, and the reaction of the locals was generally, What is that and what the fuck is wrong with you?

shivam
01-21-2010, 03:30 PM
That was the reaction in Japan as well, which is humorous since as a culture they were mainly vegetarian until the meiji restoration.

i'm just grateful to be able to live in a place where the practice of my beliefs is almost inconsequentially easy.

Dadgum Roi
01-21-2010, 03:37 PM
That was the reaction in Japan as well, which is humorous since as a culture they were mainly vegetarian until the meiji restoration.

That's why they have that reaction- vegetarianism is associated with poverty, and meat eating with prosperity. My family's holiday meals used to be like 90% vegetables, and they would have had the same reaction. Most of the world's vegetarians don't do it by choice.

Lucas
01-21-2010, 03:41 PM
And i want to be clear that i'm not actually calling any of you guys dicks. I'm aware of how reality works, and know that if i'm invited to a steak house or a barbecue, i should just make a mental note to find something else to eat. It's incredibly bad manners to bitch after recieving an invitation, and my dietary choices are not your problem. But when i invite you to my house, which i am glad to do, I'd ask the same courtesy.

Now I know, should I ever be invited to Shivam's house, to hide a stick of jerky up my sleeve upon which I can nibble unobtrusively if need be.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 04:04 PM
Without completely throwing my hat into the arena, I'd like to say that I've always found dietary restrictions based on abstract, personal things, like cultural tradition or self-challenge, to be much easier to sympathize with than ones based on outside morals. The only way to really fulfill the moral ideals held by, say, the PETA crowd, like not harming animals and not interfering with their ecosystems, is to go off the grid completely. Every bit of participation in the grid thrusts more and more hypocrisy into that lifestyle – which wouldn't be a problem if so many of those people weren't evangelical, or at least passive-aggressive when dealing with anybody who doesn't have the same restrictions. (Not everyone with moral food restrictions is like this, but I have witnessed some very nasty displays of it before.) On the other hand, there is absolutely no arguing with a personal decision that someone makes, that they justify completely with internal values and obligations without imposing any ideas on other people or the rest of the world.

Back in high school, I had this one team-taught science class. One teacher was a longtime veteran and was awesome. The other was fresh out of grad school and had no idea what she was doing. She would always take asides to preach veganism and socialism to us. We were a pretty left-wing class, but we knew that she was stepping way outside her bounds, so we hit back. One day, we made her cry by grilling her for the hypocrisy of wearing leather shoes. In retrospect, it was pretty mean and I feel bad. But it was so awesome at the time.

But yeah... I actually spent about two years as a vegetarian around the latter part of my college years. It was strictly a challenge to myself, to see if I could deprive myself of a staple of my diet, expand my palette, and get healthier in the process. It worked.

And now that I have that experience under my belt, I (arrogantly/selfishly) find myself being kind of impressed by people who stay vegetarian for reasons of tradition or reasons similar to my own, but so enraged at people who think they're morally superior for not eating pork and can't wait to tell me all about it (but who then turn around and do all sorts of things of similar moral concern, like drinking bottled water and driving a car).

Another pet peeve, which is close to my heart as a Chicagoan: people who are against foie gras. If you think animal captivity and animal slaughter for food are horrible things overall, then by all means stop taking part in those things, and I won't be bothered as long as you keep that stuff internal and don't preach to me uninvited. However, if you've decided completely arbitrarily that foie gras production is the worst thing, but you'll have no problem turning around and eating chicken from Tyson or Perdue, read a Pollan book and kiss my ass.

Hey, I guess I did throw my hat into the arena.

Wolfgang
01-21-2010, 04:08 PM
Another pet peeve, which is close to my heart as a Chicagoan: people who are against foie gras.

I just think it tastes like (what I imagine to be) cat food. Geese are assholes and will attack you if they get the opportunity.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 04:18 PM
Hilariously, I've never actually tried foie gras (mostly for financial reasons). I'm just offended at the idea of somebody deciding it is even a shred less humane than the nasty, industrial production of "normal" American meat, to which most people don't pay a second thought. The same goes for other taboo meats as well. My farm-raised veal is nowhere near as damaging to the ecosystem (and to human society) as your* boneless, skinless chicken breast from the Safeway.

*This does not refer to anyone in particular.

Red Hedgehog
01-21-2010, 04:26 PM
Ethics or no, you're categorically rejecting a lot of foods and creating all sorts of potentially sticky situations for yourself if you travel. I had a lot of vegetarian friends in South America, and the reaction of the locals was generally, What is that and what the fuck is wrong with you?

Well sure. There's no question that limiting your palate for any reason makes it harder to find things to eat, even in America where we accept all sorts of crazy things like veganism.

At least with some strains of vegetarianism/veganism/only eating free range meat/etc., I can see the reasoning behind that (even if I don't agree with it) and thus understand why people wouldn't eat certain things. Like, it's possible they might enjoy them taste-wise, but they have a good reason for otherwise not eating them. For people who whine, "Oh, I don't like rice" (to pick a random food), I'm just like "Suck it up!"

But I also have a hard time accepting that people don't like food that I enjoy.

Parish
01-21-2010, 05:14 PM
Anyway, back to the topic at hand....

I have a very strange sort of pickiness. I have broad-ranging tastes and will eat nearly everything. At tapas or izakaya, I will happily eat a little of everything on the table. Yet there are some very common American food items I find completely disgusting. Pretty much everything people put on normal burgers (mustard, dill pickles, raw onions, mayonnaise) are completely disgusting, even though I love similar variants like horseradish, asian pickles, caramelized onions, and aioli. I make it a policy to try any dish offered me, no matter how exotic, once. Usually I like them! But give me a default American burger and I can't stomach it.

Now, a burger with green chiles or pineapple or bean sprouts or mushrooms? I can totally get behind that.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 05:17 PM
Anyway, back to the topic at hand....

I have a very strange sort of pickiness. I have broad-ranging tastes and will eat nearly everything. At tapas or izakaya, I will happily eat a little of everything on the table. Yet there are some very common American food items I find completely disgusting. Pretty much everything people put on normal burgers (mustard, dill pickles, raw onions, mayonnaise) are completely disgusting, even though I love similar variants like horseradish, asian pickles, caramelized onions, and aioli. I make it a policy to try any dish offered me, no matter how exotic, once. Usually I like them! But give me a default American burger and I can't stomach it.

Now, a burger with green chiles or pineapple or bean sprouts or mushrooms? I can totally get behind that.

This just makes you sound uppity! What to you put on your hot dogs?

I won't lie I make fancy burgers all the time, I've got this really great one that gets a chiptole mayo as well as jalapeno's and arugula, but I don't knock the ol standard of mustard, kethcup, mayo, lettuce, tomatos, onion on a toasted bun!

shivam
01-21-2010, 05:22 PM
i pretty much stopped being a picky eater when i moved to japan. i figured that i already have one hard restriction on what i can and can't eat to deal with, so it's silly for me to be even more discriminative.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 05:25 PM
Parish needs to go to Kuma's Corner, a metal bar/burger joint in Chicago where there are about 20 burgers on the menu, all served on a delicious pretzel roll, all named after a different band, and all with some kind of unheard-of complement of toppings that's usually themed after a specific cuisine. My favorites are the Melvins (prosciutto, basil, fresh mozzarella) and the Pantera (basically the building blocks of chiles rellenos). They once had a weekly special – the High On Fire, I think – that had a pineapple ring, Huy Fong Sriracha sauce, and some crispy shoestring potatoes.

Inexplicably (for such a meat-soaked place), this place also has a vegetarian (though not vegan) option in the form of the absolute best macaroni and cheese I've ever had. I got it with scallions and peas once. Ridiculous.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 05:30 PM
i pretty much stopped being a picky eater when i moved to japan. i figured that i already have one hard restriction on what i can and can't eat to deal with, so it's silly for me to be even more discriminative.

My parents trained me too well, I was drilled from a young age to eat everything on my plate and never say "no" when someone offered me food. Couple this with some time in foreign lands (Brazil and the Southern USA) where I was required to eat whatever was offered to me (don't ask it was a cultural thing I had to do) and I can't think of things I won't eat or get queasy thinking about.

I of course like some foods more than others, but I'll eat it all...

so far

estragon
01-21-2010, 05:35 PM
i pretty much stopped being a picky eater when i moved to japan. i figured that i already have one hard restriction on what i can and can't eat to deal with, so it's silly for me to be even more discriminative.

I stopped being a picky eater when I made friends who introduced me to Thai, Indian, Ethiopian, Japanese, etc. food in high school and college, and about 4 years in Japan (+obstinant desire to erase stereotypes about what Americans do and don't eat) killed off any remaining inhibitions I had. If it's edible, I will probably put it in my mouth and swallow. And, most of the time, I like it.

Until then, I was an extremely picky eater who pretty much only ate 'Merrican food.

Reading about picky eaters makes me sad. Food has given me so many amazing experiences, and it's depressing for me to imagine that there are people who won't (won't=/=can't) eat so much good stuff. (Like, say, the disturbing amount of posters here who seem anti-vegetable.)

I understand if you have an ethical/religious objection (which puts you into the "can't eat" category), but otherwise you're only hurting yourself.

Ethan
01-21-2010, 05:39 PM
I wonder... is there anyone here whose pickiness is so extensive that they have to list the foods they can eat, as opposed to the ones they can't? I've met a few people who are like this, and it throws me for a loop.

shivam
01-21-2010, 05:40 PM
i've known people like that, who won't eat more than a boiled piece of chicken.

Rosencrantz
01-21-2010, 05:42 PM
I can't speak for others, but for me, I don't avoid eating things because I think they look or sound disgusting, but because I've tried them and I seriously can't stand the taste or something. Some foods just make me gag and others are just unpleasant. I wish I could control it, and like I said in my first post, I always try new things, but I guess there's just something wrong with me.

estragon
01-21-2010, 05:45 PM
I know someone who doesn't eat rice.

It makes me so angry.

teg
01-21-2010, 05:47 PM
I used to know somebody who had a list of what he would eat each day and when he would eat it. He had devised an absolutely balanced daily routine that gave him perfect nutritional values.

It largely consisted of eating an apple every few hours, two small meals, and one instance of "seven Jelly Belly brand jelly beans."

He ate like this every day.

taosterman
01-21-2010, 06:09 PM
When Woody Harrelson said "I hate coconut - not the flavor, the texture" in Zombieland, only a fear of social awkwardness kept me from throwing up my hands, cheering and whistling in solidarity. Also, I can't whistle.

I've slowly gotten over a lot of food hangups over the years (sushi, seafood, tofu, eggplant, organic peanut butter) but I still have textural issues with a lot of fruit, especially pulpy ones (oranges, tangerines, peaches). The seeds kill strawberries for me, and bananas I think are just gross from both a texture and taste standpoint.

As much as I've tried, I've never been able to parse the appeal of "cold heat" - horseradish, wasabi and spicy mustard just completely kill a dish for me. I love the other kind of spicy, though.

I guess picky eaters are frustrating when it comes to choosing a restaurant, but I'm surprised at all of the bitterness being flung around on here. Some people just have an awkward relationship with their taste buds, and I doubt it's particularly fun for them either.

shivam
01-21-2010, 06:32 PM
I know someone who doesn't eat rice.

It makes me so angry.

i knew someone, a south indian in fact, who was deathly allergic to rice. even the fumes from it cooking would make her break out into hives. if you know anything about southie cooking, you know that it's ENTIRELY RICE BASED. and why on god's green earth she'd choose to teach english in japan, i'll never know.

Lucas
01-21-2010, 06:59 PM
Some people just have an awkward relationship with their taste buds, and I doubt it's particularly fun for them either.

I can't speak for others, but for me, I don't avoid eating things because I think they look or sound disgusting, but because I've tried them and I seriously can't stand the taste or something. Some foods just make me gag and others are just unpleasant. I wish I could control it, and like I said in my first post, I always try new things, but I guess there's just something wrong with me.

Like Rosencrantz said. It's really not fun. Hell, I would love to cook more often, even take cooking classes, but when I wouldn't be able to eat even half of the things I have to practice cooking then what's the point?

It's not fun getting the same exact teasing comments from family at every get together, or having to make even a slightly custom order at a restaurant (even if it is just to leave the veggies off my burger), or watching food shows on the TV and thinking how delicious it looks despite knowing you would have a tough time actually chewing and swallowing it... Food is a huge part of any culture, picky eaters are missing out on a lot, and we all know it.

mopinks
01-21-2010, 07:04 PM
I saw a TELEVISION PROGRAMME about picky eaters on Food Network, featuring people who would literally only eat one or two things, ever. one guy could not bring himself to eat anything but grilled cheese sandwiches, and it was completely destroying his life.

it was the most depressing.

Parish
01-21-2010, 07:48 PM
This just makes you sound uppity! What to you put on your hot dogs?
Hot dogs are something I don't eat, because they taste like a tube of processed lunch meat, but when I have a sausage-on-a-bun I tend not to put anything on it at all. This is because a good sausage is interesting all by itself.

Calorie Mate
01-21-2010, 07:56 PM
I think I can get behind Parish, re: condiments.

For people who whine, "Oh, I don't like rice" (to pick a random food), I'm just like "Suck it up!"

I can't speak for others, but for me, I don't avoid eating things because I think they look or sound disgusting, but because I've tried them and I seriously can't stand the taste or something. Some foods just make me gag and others are just unpleasant. I wish I could control it, and like I said in my first post, I always try new things, but I guess there's just something wrong with me.

Rosencrantz has it. It's not that I'm being a baby about certain things, it's that I find them so awful I physically can't eat them. You should see my face whenever I'm feeling brave and try to choke down some sushi.



Parish needs to go to Kuma's Corner, a metal bar/burger joint in Chicago where there are about 20 burgers on the menu, all served on a delicious pretzel roll, all named after a different band, and all with some kind of unheard-of complement of toppings that's usually themed after a specific cuisine. My favorites are the Melvins (prosciutto, basil, fresh mozzarella) and the Pantera (basically the building blocks of chiles rellenos). They once had a weekly special – the High On Fire, I think – that had a pineapple ring, Huy Fong Sriracha sauce, and some crispy shoestring potatoes.

Inexplicably (for such a meat-soaked place), this place also has a vegetarian (though not vegan) option in the form of the absolute best macaroni and cheese I've ever had. I got it with scallions and peas once. Ridiculous.

Holy shit that sounds amazing. Wish I'd known about that before I visited!

Jeanie
01-21-2010, 07:57 PM
I tend to think of myself as more of a "Fussy Eater (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gk-BR-EBMU4)" than a picky eater.

I don't like onions themselves. I like the flavor it adds to meat, I can eat it diced like it is in meatloaf, and I like Onion Rings, but sliced onions on a burger? I'll pick it right off. I think it's the texture.

I also don't like melon. Watermelon, musk melon, honeydew, I don't like any of 'em.

estragon
01-21-2010, 07:59 PM
Hot dogs are something I don't eat, because they taste like a tube of processed lunch meat, but when I have a sausage-on-a-bun I tend not to put anything on it at all. This is because a good sausage is interesting all by itself.

I'm generally okay with dismissing hot dogs, but everyone should go to Hot Doug's (http://www.hotdougs.com/specials.htm) in Chicago at least once.

From today's specials:

The Game of the Week
Bacon and Cheddar Elk Sausage with Half Acre Beer Mustard and Moutardier Cheese

The Kleo Lee (Today's Celebrity Sausage)
Chipotle and Cilantro Smoked Chicken Sausage with Mole a la Carlos and Queso Enchilado

Other Specials
The Atomic Bomb: Damn Spicy Pork Sausage with Spicy Mango Mayonnaise and Smoked Gouda Cheese

ASandoval
01-21-2010, 08:04 PM
I feel at ease now that others have admitted that some stuff they just can't physically bring themselves to eat other things. Do any of you then get frustrated and upset when people won't stop bugging you to try something you just really don't want to?

For the record, my girlfriend keeps an excel spreadsheet of what I do and don't eat for cross reference purposes.

Yes, this is a true story. Yes, it really is that bad. I'm actually in fear of my diet considering how limited my palette is.

taosterman
01-21-2010, 08:56 PM
Do any of you take heat from people about food you don't necessarily hate, but just find boring? For me it's shortbread and sugar cookies. I can gulp them down just fine, but I just don't think they're very interesting. Same goes for pancakes.

Violentvixen
01-21-2010, 09:03 PM
I know someone who doesn't eat rice.

It makes me so angry.

One of the guys I knew in Colorado refused to eat beans in any form.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 09:22 PM
Hot dogs are something I don't eat, because they taste like a tube of processed lunch meat, but when I have a sausage-on-a-bun I tend not to put anything on it at all. This is because a good sausage is interesting all by itself.

But Danger Dogs! Danger Dogs!

Rosencrantz
01-21-2010, 09:49 PM
YDo any of you take heat from people about food you don't necessarily hate, but just find boring? For me it's shortbread and sugar cookies. I can gulp them down just fine, but I just don't think they're very interesting. Same goes for pancakes.

Yeah, sometimes. It's probably got something to do with the fact that I don't like many condiments or toppings, so I miss out on the full experience or something. I like waffles much more than pancakes, and I only have either with syrup.

jeditanuki
01-21-2010, 09:54 PM
Growing up, my parents never gave me the idea that one *could* be picky about what one ate, so I just ate everything they gave me. As a result, I love broccoli, spinach, brussels sprouts, what have you. Although, when I was young I hated cheese...what was I thinking?!

There are certain things and cuisines I won't go out of my way to eat (the combination of fruit and meat comes to mind), and things I've trained myself to eat more and even enjoy (tomatoes and sweet potatoes). I've done this mainly because of their nutritional value and because who knows, I might just be missing out on something.

Since joining the church of Anthony Bourdain, I've made it a point to try and eat every animal I've never eaten before, and every for animal I've eaten I try to eat a part of it I've never eaten before. So far, it's making for a fun gustatory ride.

Falselogic
01-21-2010, 10:06 PM
Yeah, sometimes. It's probably got something to do with the fact that I don't like many continents or toppings, so I miss out on the full experience or something. I like waffles much more than pancakes, and I only have either with syrup.


Yeah, Fuck Antarctica!

=P

Parish
01-21-2010, 10:30 PM
I'm generally okay with dismissing hot dogs, but everyone should go to Hot Doug's (http://www.hotdougs.com/specials.htm) in Chicago at least once.
Those specials are all sausages, not hot dogs! I'm cool with sausages. They're kind of nasty if you think about how they're made, but provided you cram the right kind of ingredients in the grinder along with the extruded subpar meat paste product, they can be exceptionally delicious. There's a hippie-run organic sausage joint a block from my apartment that has some pretty great selections (along with vegan options for Shivam!), and Hot Doug's sausages sound wonderful.

I guess when I stop and think about it, my biggest eating aversion is to highly processed foods. Hot dogs, most fast food, lunch meats, packaged pastries, that sort of thing. I'm so glad I'm living in a time and place when there are countless food options beyond "spending hours making it yourself" and "mass-manufactured junk"; growing up, it was either mom slaved away in the kitchen or else it was foul cold cuts all around.

Rosencrantz
01-21-2010, 10:43 PM
Yeah, Fuck Antarctica!

=P

Hah! The auto spell check on my phone can be really weird sometimes. It knew the word "waffle", but not "waffles".

Ghost from Spelunker
01-21-2010, 11:15 PM
I don't consider skipping foods for religious reasons, or foods that destroy your stomach or trigger allergies to be "picky."

For me part of eating is to stay alive and healthy, not making my life full of perfect mouth fun during my three meals. So I must eat my greens...to stay alive!

How can any foods texture or flavor be worse than being hungry?
You know what happens when you skipped that side dish because it had one ingredient you don't like? You get that wolf putting his ear up to your stomach.

shivam
01-22-2010, 12:36 AM
Those specials are all sausages, not hot dogs! I'm cool with sausages. They're kind of nasty if you think about how they're made, but provided you cram the right kind of ingredients in the grinder along with the extruded subpar meat paste product, they can be exceptionally delicious. There's a hippie-run organic sausage joint a block from my apartment that has some pretty great selections (along with vegan options for Shivam!), and Hot Doug's sausages sound wonderful.

I guess when I stop and think about it, my biggest eating aversion is to highly processed foods. Hot dogs, most fast food, lunch meats, packaged pastries, that sort of thing. I'm so glad I'm living in a time and place when there are countless food options beyond "spending hours making it yourself" and "mass-manufactured junk"; growing up, it was either mom slaved away in the kitchen or else it was foul cold cuts all around.

we should go on a san francisco food safari one day, and find all the fun and interesting local joints.

Gredlen
01-22-2010, 12:41 AM
I don't think I'm a particularly picky eater; there are a number of things I don't like to eat, but relatively few that I would outright refuse.

I think probably the most notable thing I don't like to eat, though, is mayonnaise. I absolutely can not stand potato or mac salad, the latter of which comes with basically every plate lunch in Hawaii (and goes completely untouched by me every time).

I didn't really have a problem with this in Japan, despite the fact that they seem to love putting mayonnaise on everything there. Either I got lucky or they just don't put so much of it that it's overwhelming.

mopinks
01-22-2010, 02:17 AM
The Kleo Lee (Today's Celebrity Sausage)
Chipotle and Cilantro Smoked Chicken Sausage with Mole a la Carlos and Queso Enchilado

I don't think I'll ever be happy in life until I eat this.

Wolfgang
01-22-2010, 02:18 AM
we should go on a san francisco food safari one day, and find all the fun and interesting local joints.

That sounds like a ton-o'-fun.

upupdowndown
01-22-2010, 04:44 AM
I guess when I stop and think about it, my biggest eating aversion is to highly processed foods. Hot dogs, most fast food, lunch meats, packaged pastries, that sort of thing. I'm so glad I'm living in a time and place when there are countless food options beyond "spending hours making it yourself" and "mass-manufactured junk"; growing up, it was either mom slaved away in the kitchen or else it was foul cold cuts all around.

Co-sign. There's nothing worse for me than a dinner that came from a box on the shelf. (Exception: crackers with good cheese.)

The picky/not picky conundrum really comes into play when you're living with someone or dating them. My ex didn't like beans or mushrooms, so suddenly it was difficult to make half of my normal vegetarian dish repertoire. My husband can't do spicy food and hates seafood, so that's also a constraint. It's a wee bit frustrating - though I think actually being the one with unwilling tastebuds is more frustrating.

NevznachaY
01-22-2010, 05:19 AM
Pretty much everything people put on normal burgers (mustard, dill pickles, raw onions, mayonnaise) are completely disgusting,

I tend to think that mustard is a bit like wine: you have to actively search for a type that suits you. Mayo, on the other hand, should be mixed at home - it's easy and it's awesome. And there lots of variations as well.

Daikaiju
01-22-2010, 06:00 AM
I can be fairly picky. I'm not very fond of beans in general. As an adult I can put up with them, mixed with rice or maybe in paste form like refried beans in Tex Mex.

Lima Beans can go to Hell. I am repressing a gag reflex while even thinking about them. Not exaggerating.

I can only handle cooked spinach with generous amounts of vinegar, though I don't mind quiche or spanakopita.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 06:51 AM
I can't speak for others, but for me, I don't avoid eating things because I think they look or sound disgusting, but because I've tried them and I seriously can't stand the taste or something. Some foods just make me gag and others are just unpleasant. I wish I could control it, and like I said in my first post, I always try new things, but I guess there's just something wrong with me.

No. There is nothing wrong with you, you are not special.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 06:54 AM
Well sure. There's no question that limiting your palate for any reason makes it harder to find things to eat, even in America where we accept all sorts of crazy things like veganism.

At least with some strains of vegetarianism/veganism/only eating free range meat/etc., I can see the reasoning behind that (even if I don't agree with it) and thus understand why people wouldn't eat certain things. Like, it's possible they might enjoy them taste-wise, but they have a good reason for otherwise not eating them. For people who whine, "Oh, I don't like rice" (to pick a random food), I'm just like "Suck it up!"

But I also have a hard time accepting that people don't like food that I enjoy.

I respect it more when it's a long standing cultural practice, but it's still a form of picky eating. In some ways it's worse, because you're following the lead of picky people that have been dead for millenia.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 06:59 AM
I was required to eat whatever was offered to me (don't ask it was a cultural thing I had to do)

That's the thing that kills me about picky eaters. Refusing food, talking about how bad/gross/unacceptable something is...is so rude. So rude. Just thinking about it makes me see red.

Calorie Mate
01-22-2010, 11:27 AM
But you're getting worked up over the equivalent of someone not having the exact same preferences as you. I've seen you post in other threads, I know you're a rational guy and don't see red every time someone didn't like a book or game or movie you did. Why is it different for food? Some people would rather politely decline eating something they don't like instead of choking it down so they can please you.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 11:34 AM
But you're getting worked up over the equivalent of someone not having the exact same preferences as you. I've seen you post in other threads, I know you're a rational guy and don't see red every time someone didn't like a book or game or movie you did. Why is it different for food? Some people would rather politely decline eating something they don't like instead of choking it down so they can please you.

Food is more a part of who we are than books or games. Food can define cultures, and food often has a central role when it comes to hospitality. To reject the food is to reject the hospitality, which is rude, which is tantamount to a war crime where I'm from. And I've been in the role of the person choking stuff down, the first time I went abroad. I would never in a million years have rejected anything those people put in front of me. My grandmother probably would have materialized behind me and garroted me.

shivam
01-22-2010, 11:41 AM
yeah, i'd have to agree. everytime i refuse a meal, even with meat, i'm filled with a deep regret and sorrow. The buddha himself said that a person must never turn down that which is offered, even if the offering be repulsive, for the intent is the important part.

Calorie Mate
01-22-2010, 11:48 AM
I totally agree and in fact follow that myself. Hell, I wouldn't have known how much I love paneer if I hadn't forced myself to eat anything in front of me in India. And I've choked down plenty of meals I didn't love when, say, a friend's parents invited me over for a home cooked meal or something. That's just polite.

I really only have a problem when going out to restaurants or casual hang outs with friends and someone has a problem with it. So I got to a party and I don't like the chips they bought - so what? I'll eat something else. It isn't a big deal, and that's when I get annoyed at people that are annoyed about picky eaters.

Ethan
01-22-2010, 11:48 AM
I like the idea of always accepting hospitality as a guide, but not as an absolute rule. I do think it's classless to turn down food offered to you by someone you don't know very well for a petty reason like not being especially hungry, or not being the biggest fan of the food. If the food is actually going to bring you significant discomfort, though, I think it's okay to thank the person and make a gracious, gentle excuse. I say this knowing that if I were the host, I would not pass any judgment on a person who turned down my food. I am also from the north, though. And I can't really think of a food that causes me so much discomfort that I'd turn it down, unless it was something out of the ordinary, like a bowl of raw japapeños. But I know that not everyone tastes things like I do.

If you already know the person quite well, it's completely okay to turn down food in my book.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 11:56 AM
If the food is actually going to bring you significant discomfort, though, I think it's okay to thank the person and make a gracious, gentle excuse.

How often is this really the case? If the people offering it can eat it, chances are you can eat it, too. Honestly, one of the biggest gripes I have about picky eaters is that a lot of them conflate allergies with things that they simply don't like. Shrimp allergies are very common; I am allergic to them myself. I told my hosts in Ecuador this when we were eating ceviche, and totally they got it. "Oh yeah, Juan can't eat them either, try the fish ceviche instead." It's when you try to bullshit people with incredibly specific, previously-unheard of allergies that you run into trouble.

Ethan
01-22-2010, 12:02 PM
My mother has this childhood trauma story she always tells me; she went over to a friend's house for dinner, and green beans were being served. My mother hates green beans and, according to her, reacts to them kind of like one would react to poison. Even the smell can make her queasy. This was in Virginia, though, and she was taught to never turn down food. She struggled through them, and then the parents piled a bunch more on her plate. And then again. And then she puked all over the table, and basically ran away, and she never went to that house again.

Now, obviously I don't know if this is exactly how it went down. I also don't know how much of her current extremely severe hatred of green beans is something she's always had, and how much is related to this one incident. But I know that if you hate something so much that it actually triggers your gag reflex, I think that qualifies as enough discomfort to turn down the food. It might create some tension in certain cultures, but probably less tension than puking would.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 12:05 PM
I really only have a problem when going out to restaurants or casual hang outs with friends and someone has a problem with it. So I got to a party and I don't like the chips they bought - so what? I'll eat something else. It isn't a big deal, and that's when I get annoyed at people that are annoyed about picky eaters.

That's quite a bit different. As long as you're quiet about it, I don't have a problem. What I hate is people being loud and demonstrative about it.

shivam
01-22-2010, 12:08 PM
yeah, i'm never loud and demonstrative about my eating habits outside of the internet. unless someone just tells me to pick the meat off, at which i firmly but politely reply that that's an untenable solution.

Ethan
01-22-2010, 12:09 PM
yeah, i'm never loud and demonstrative about my eating habits outside of the internet. unless someone just tells me to pick the meat off, at which i firmly but politely reply that that's an untenable solution.

Polish vegan: only a little bit of pork fat.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 12:10 PM
My mother has this childhood trauma story she always tells me; she went over to a friend's house for dinner, and green beans were being served. My mother hates green beans and, according to her, reacts to them kind of like one would react to poison. Even the smell can make her queasy. This was in Virginia, though, and she was taught to never turn down food. She struggled through them, and then the parents piled a bunch more on her plate. And then again. And then she puked all over the table, and basically ran away, and she never went to that house again.

What you should do is eat enough to be polite, but leave some on the plate. If you polish them off, the implication is that you want more. If you leave some, hey, you're full.


But I know that if you hate something so much that it actually triggers your gag reflex, I think that qualifies as enough discomfort to turn down the food. It might create some tension in certain cultures, but probably less tension than puking would.

I have never run across anything in the US, Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Chile, or the UK that made me gag. If you are constantly running across stuff that makes you gag, I guarantee that it is in your head and you are overly sensitive.

Ethan
01-22-2010, 12:19 PM
Yeah, that's what I tell my mother when I make fun of her for not liking something so good as green beans. I believe it wasn't really an option to leave a few on the plate, though, because the mother was egging her on to finish her vegetables in a very '50s parent fashion. Also, she was 7 or something.

I did have a poison-like reaction to food one time. I was out to eat at a Chinese restaurant with my brother and father, and we had a big plate of bitter melon sauteed with other veggies. I took a bite of the bitter melon and it filled my mouth with such an intense, noxious, burning bitterness that it felt like I was taking a bite out of a bar of soap or something. I had to spit it out. It wasn't a psychological thing, because I had every expectation that it was going to taste great. It was just instant rejection by my whole mouth. Pure reflex.

I avoided bitter melon for a few years after this. I tried it again a few months ago, expecting to react the same, and I didn't. It was actually pretty good! I can't explain what happened the first time, but it happened.

shivam
01-22-2010, 12:22 PM
bitter melon is pretty fucking repulsive unless you cook it right. but that's why it's bitter melon.

Ethan
01-22-2010, 12:22 PM
Yeah, but that first time, my bro and dad were popping it like candy.

Wolfgang
01-22-2010, 12:28 PM
But I know that if you hate something so much that it actually triggers your gag reflex, I think that qualifies as enough discomfort to turn down the food. It might create some tension in certain cultures, but probably less tension than puking would.

THANK YOU. When I was in high school, a friend's mom practically shoved a big spoonful of potato salad in my mouth after I said I didn't really like it. It wasn't the physical act - though that would have been bad enough - but the taste and texture and smell going up into my sinuses made me throw up, right there, in the kitchen. It wasn't received well.

Shivam, Grant - do you want me throwing up in your kitchen?


I have never run across anything in the US, Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Chile, or the UK that made MMMMEEEEEE gag.

Emphasis mine, of course, but really - you're so hung up on food that you can't have the slightest bit of empathy for people who don't share your cast-iron palate? You don't think anything - ANYTHING - is too disgusting to refuse?

shivam
01-22-2010, 12:30 PM
shawn, when you come to SF, i will cook you a meal. then we'll see, son. then we'll see.

Wolfgang
01-22-2010, 12:37 PM
shawn, when you come to SF, i will cook you a meal. then we'll see, son. then we'll see.

We will! I'm not overly picky myself, as I'm one of the few people on this board who apparently can enjoy fake meat, such that if I'm in the mood I'll choose it over the real thing. Though it might go badly if the dish is mushy, runny (with, like, juice) (I have a really hard time with certain mouth-feels) or has asparagus/brussels sprouts.

Let it be known: that even when I do refuse a dish, I will go out of my way to acknowledge how much I appreciate that someone took the effort. It's a very, very kind gesture!

Ethan
01-22-2010, 12:39 PM
You don't think anything - ANYTHING - is too disgusting to refuse?

The thing that makes this a hard side of the argument for me to take is that I don't consider anything too disgusting to refuse. I will eat pretty much anything that I know will not cause me grave physical damage. I sometimes even eat things I know I don't like in order to challenge myself. But here's the thing: how do I know that other people aren't different? I prefer to be considerate above all else, which means offering food and being okay with someone turning it down. I guess you could call that... big city northern hospitality.

I am jealous of this dinner at Shivam's house.

Wolfgang
01-22-2010, 12:42 PM
I guess you could call that... big city northern hospitality.

Which, I reiterate, will always be very gratefully acknowledged - sometimes overly so. Honestly, if someone's going to be genuinely, profoundly insulted with me after that - well, I don't know. Maybe it's best that this hypothetical person and I part company anyway.

Ethan
01-22-2010, 12:46 PM
Another part of the puzzle is that I was raised in a culturally Jewish household. Big city American Jews are the kind of people who would not only be okay with a guest turning down food; they would demand a complete list from all their guests of what foods they do and do not like, so as to execute a meal that perfectly caters to everyone's needs, no matter how petty. If a guest is displeased, or if it's even suspected that a guest is displeased, it will be the host who apologizes and feels guilty.

Ah, culture.

upupdowndown
01-22-2010, 01:44 PM
If I'm throwing a dinner party, I get a list of culinary dealbreakers/allergies from my guests beforehand. If I'm going to be in the kitchen all day cooking and baking, I want people to enjoy eating what I've prepared! I don't view it as my job to make my friends like brussel sprouts or shrimp or mushrooms or roasted fruit with rosemary or whatever they don't eat for whatever reason.

I don't pressure friends to try stuff I've made if it's something that makes them uncomfortable. who wants that kind of drama? I've had people not eat things at dinner parties and I just forget about it.

that being said, I personally never refuse to try something if I am a guest. I don't have any actual food allergies, nor is there anything that would automatically make me throw up. Which, for me personally, is the only reason I would refuse to try something a friend made.

jeditanuki
01-22-2010, 01:44 PM
I did have a poison-like reaction to food one time. I was out to eat at a Chinese restaurant with my brother and father, and we had a big plate of bitter melon sauteed with other veggies. I took a bite of the bitter melon and it filled my mouth with such an intense, noxious, burning bitterness that it felt like I was taking a bite out of a bar of soap or something. I had to spit it out. It wasn't a psychological thing, because I had every expectation that it was going to taste great. It was just instant rejection by my whole mouth. Pure reflex.

This way my first reaction to natto. But, hey, I tried it.

sraymonds
01-22-2010, 01:48 PM
I am the anti-picky eater. if something is edible, I will probably eat it.

I've even had sea cucumber and trust me on this one, sea cucumber is some nasty shit.

Eetzamii
01-22-2010, 01:50 PM
I'm not picky about what I eat, usually, though there are some things I don't like (and a few things that have made me sick every time and I have thus given up on them).

I wouldn't eat just because someone's offering it, especially if I don't know the person well. I'm being asked to put something into my body, and I don't do that without being comfortable about it. If I'm in a social situation, I'll already be nervous enough without having to worry about eating. That said, if I've known someone for a while, I don't think I'd have a problem eating whatever they offered. I suppose I view eating as much more of a private, personal thing, one that requires a certain level of trust.

On the flip side, if I were to make food and a guest doesn't eat it, I really don't see why I should be at all insulted, whatever their reason. I would respect the other person's right to choose. I feel that the guest should be made comfortable above all else, and if not eating makes them comfortable, then I'd only be happy to oblige. Getting angry over this seems strange to me.

This is a very odd topic that I haven't really thought about before, but I guess I'm not social enough for issues of hospitality to even be relevant. I can't remember the last time I ate at someone else's house or had someone over to eat; certainly not at all in 2009. I've met people to eat lunch out or have coffee a few times, but I guess that's a bit different.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 05:35 PM
Emphasis mine, of course, but really - you're so hung up on food that you can't have the slightest bit of empathy for people who don't share your cast-iron palate? You don't think anything - ANYTHING - is too disgusting to refuse?

Everyone has the same physiological setup, for the most part. Some people have allergies(shrimp for me, a very common one) and some can taste things that ruin the flavor of certain things, but for the most part, pickiness is all in your head. Which is why there is so goddamn much of it among middle class white Americans. It's cultural.

tldr- Yes, I have empathy for people with legitimate severe sensitivities and allergies. Most people have a couple. But when one person has multiple severe sensitivities, it's probably bullshit.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 05:42 PM
Another part of the puzzle is that I was raised in a culturally Jewish household. Big city American Jews are the kind of people who would not only be okay with a guest turning down food; they would demand a complete list from all their guests of what foods they do and do not like, so as to execute a meal that perfectly caters to everyone's needs, no matter how petty. If a guest is displeased, or if it's even suspected that a guest is displeased, it will be the host who apologizes and feels guilty.

Ah, culture.

I don't get this at all. When I go over to someone's house to eat, or when I go to a restaurant to eat, I don't want to play chef. I want to eat, I want to be surprised. I like to try new things and new combinations. The cook/chef needs to retain their authorial control, for lack of a better word. When I eat your collards or your posole, I want to eat your collards and your posole, not my collards as prepared by you. I already know what my own collards taste like.

upupdowndown
01-22-2010, 06:02 PM
I don't get this at all. When I go over to someone's house to eat, or when I go to a restaurant to eat, I don't want to play chef. I want to eat, I want to be surprised. I like to try new things and new combinations. The cook/chef needs to retain their authorial control, for lack of a better word. When I eat your collards or your posole, I want to eat your collards and your posole, not my collards as prepared by you. I already know what my own collards taste like.

oh, I don't allow my guests to dictate how I cook things and I will serve them things they haven't had before; I just make sure to not cook things which they already know they don't like. I don't send out recipes for critique or anything. :-)

Ethan
01-22-2010, 07:04 PM
I don't get this at all. When I go over to someone's house to eat, or when I go to a restaurant to eat, I don't want to play chef. I want to eat, I want to be surprised. I like to try new things and new combinations. The cook/chef needs to retain their authorial control, for lack of a better word. When I eat your collards or your posole, I want to eat your collards and your posole, not my collards as prepared by you. I already know what my own collards taste like.

Jews hate uncertainty. That's why we never go camping. Ever.

(I've gotten over this in recent years, especially when it comes to food, but I do think it's actually part of the culture to some minor degree.)

Wolfgang
01-22-2010, 08:50 PM
tldr- Yes, I have empathy for people with legitimate severe sensitivities and allergies. Most people have a couple. But when one person has multiple severe sensitivities, it's probably bullshit.

Okay, here's the sitch. You're having a barbecue. Somehow, I am there. You offer to spoon out some potato salad onto my plate, and I say, "No, that's cool, I'm not really a big fan of potato salad. Thanks, though!" What is your reaction? Right now, I'm guessing: tipping over the table, bellowing like a Kodiak and attempting to stab me in the thigh with BBQ fork.

Dadgum Roi
01-22-2010, 08:58 PM
If you kept it to that, it would probably be okay. Most picky eaters do not have anything like that kind of restraint. Still, have you had my potato salad? Have you had southern potato salad at all? We don't have a barbecue here, although we do have barbecue. Etc etc.

Violentvixen
01-22-2010, 10:16 PM
I think all the picky eaters you know are assholes. All the ones I've known would have behaved like Shawn.

Guesty
01-22-2010, 10:21 PM
I'm a picky eater; I'm not used to the Indian food and such that my family likes to eat (I like mainly American). I'm trying to be less of one, I'm developing more of a tolerance for spices (I had jalapenos on pizza recently). But really, I've been a picky eater for a long time and I really have no excuse.
________
Dodge viper history (http://www.dodge-wiki.com/wiki/Dodge_Viper)

Falselogic
01-22-2010, 10:26 PM
Okay, here's the sitch. You're having a barbecue. Somehow, I am there. You offer to spoon out some potato salad onto my plate, and I say, "No, that's cool, I'm not really a big fan of potato salad. Thanks, though!" What is your reaction? Right now, I'm guessing: tipping over the table, bellowing like a Kodiak and attempting to stab me in the thigh with BBQ fork.

I'd pay money to be at THAT bbq!

SpoonyGundam
01-22-2010, 10:46 PM
Still, have you had my potato salad? Have you had southern potato salad at all?

There are very few foods that trigger my gag reflex to the point that I can't bring myself to try to eat them, but these kind of questions were super obnoxious the couple of times that they popped up for me. If you think the person's polite refusal is fine, please do not press the issue with more questions.

gamin
01-22-2010, 11:13 PM
I am the ultimate omnivore. There are few things I won't eat. At least, nothing I've yet encountered in any restaurants in America. Natto would be an absolute no, along with other things actively in the midst of decomposition (excepting cheese or yogurt).

Some people just don't like some food. Why should they have to eat it for the sake of politeness or social graces? I have a friend who outright just doesn't like food in general. He takes an amazing amount of bullshit from friends when we've gone to certain restaurants, because he absolutely will never eat fish or chicken. I don't get why some people make a big deal of it.

R.R. Bigman
01-22-2010, 11:36 PM
If I eat a sandwhich made with the end pieces of the bread I will literally throw up.

Lumber Baron
01-22-2010, 11:39 PM
I love the heels of bread. I guess I'm into crust?

Epistaxis
01-23-2010, 12:13 AM
With me it wouldn't be surprising if it were completely psychological. When I was a little kid I would eat pretty much anything, but at a very young age after a very varied meal, my folks turned on the ceiling fan. From that fan flew down a very large cockroach, directly into the back of my mouth. I'd already had a huge phobia of them; needless to say, I was sincerely creeped for many days after. Now I'm insanely picky and immediately gag on nearly all the food I used to love.

Wolfgang
01-23-2010, 03:25 AM
Have you had southern potato salad at all?

The potato salad from the incident was southern potato salad, because that's exactly what my friend's mom asked when I turned it down the first time (they were originally from the south!).

Dadgum Roi
01-23-2010, 06:05 AM
If you think the person's polite refusal is fine, please do not press the issue with more questions.

That's not something I'd ask in person; just trying to make the point that pickiness often involves rejecting something you haven't really tried. Someone on this thread even talked about not eating something because it "sounded gross". What does that even mean?

Dadgum Roi
01-23-2010, 06:12 AM
I think all the picky eaters you know are assholes. All the ones I've known would have behaved like Shawn.

Really though, Shawn is just talking about a dislike of one thing. That's not really pickiness. Pickiness is more like when you have one thing that you will eat, rather than one that you won't.

As for the asshole part, I'd say that's probably cultural. If you come over to my house and refuse to eat the food and talk about your myriad gastronomic sensitivities, I am going to think that you're an asshole.

Dadgum Roi
01-23-2010, 06:16 AM
Some people just don't like some food. Why should they have to eat it for the sake of politeness or social graces?

I value politeness and social graces. If you don't, I'd just as soon not be around you. Life is too short.

Ethan
01-23-2010, 06:57 AM
(I had jalapenos on pizza recently).

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj201/OctopusPrime/Percival%20P%20Persimmon/percy_crying.gif

Dizzy
01-23-2010, 01:05 PM
I remember watching this talk show where they brought on a little girl who refused to anything that wasn't sealed. She was traumatized by eating a hot dog that had a piece of someone's nail lodged into it. The weird thing was that her mom was crying about it and not her. I don't know, I think I have a high tolerance. Sometimes I will eat food that other people have already eaten. Cuz I'm villainous like that.

Lucas
01-23-2010, 01:15 PM
I have absolutely no problem eating something that's already partially eaten by someone else, assuming I know the provenance. Hell, last night I had a dream about making a meal out of abandoned food at a restaurant.

Dizzy
01-23-2010, 01:17 PM
You know, there is something intimate about eating out of the same plate that your lover is eating out of. Maybe even eating out the same mouth but that is probably going too far.

gamin
01-23-2010, 02:50 PM
Food is something you have to ingest and process in your body. It's no different to me than drugs or alcohol; if someone says no to it, they shouldn't be pressed on it.

To me pressing someone to eat something is way more impolite then not eating something. If its something someone made, that just means more leftovers for them.

John
01-23-2010, 03:36 PM
My friend will not eat any meat that is still on the bone. Ribs, wings, some steak, all off the menu. She tried to humor me at a bbq I was hosting and tried to have some ribs, but ended up throwing up (politely).

It's definitely a psychological hangup, because it reminds her that what she's putting in her mouth used to be a muscle in another living organism. Same thing with veins in chicken, fat on steak, etc. She's perfectly fine when whatever she's eating is disguised as something else, or ground beyond recognition. I would rather know exactly what I'm eating, and be able to respect the animal that gave its life for my sustenance. She would rather pretend that meat magically appears at the grocery store.

So far, the only things that I've found I don't like are lamb vindaloo, and salmon roe sushi. The latter triggered my gag reflex when all the little eggs started popping in my mouth.

I will try anything once, and end up liking most things that typical 'americans' don't. Whenever I'm at a mexican place, and they have anything with lengua (beef tongue) on the menu, I'm all over that. Authentic tacos de lengua with all the condiments are the best things.

Dadgum Roi
01-23-2010, 04:55 PM
It's definitely a psychological hangup, because it reminds her that what she's putting in her mouth used to be a muscle in another living organism. Same thing with veins in chicken, fat on steak, etc. She's perfectly fine when whatever she's eating is disguised as something else, or ground beyond recognition.

This. This is what drives me nuts. For the love of god, just don't eat meat, super-sensitive person.


I will try anything once, and end up liking most things that typical 'americans' don't. Whenever I'm at a mexican place, and they have anything with lengua (beef tongue) on the menu, I'm all over that. Authentic tacos de lengua with all the condiments are the best things.

Lengua is awesome when they fry it after boiling it.

Dadgum Roi
01-23-2010, 04:57 PM
To me pressing someone to eat something is way more impolite then not eating something. If its something someone made, that just means more leftovers for them.

I wasn't talking about pressing anyone to eat something, just my reaction to pickiness, especially extreme pickiness.

Wolfgang
01-23-2010, 05:20 PM
As for the asshole part, I'd say that's probably cultural. If you come over to my house and refuse to eat the food and talk about your myriad gastronomic sensitivities, I am going to think that you're an asshole.

I will agree that it's one thing to politely decline something if you really object to it, and another entirely to bitch and moan, especially if the person insists on going on about their "condition".

A few weeks ago I went to my usual dinner-and-Magic night at a friend's, and she was making all this Japanese stuff, including this really, really... horrifying... salad... thing... that had, like, dill and fish and weird chopped up shit and juice that looked and smelled like Thousand Island dressing mixed with pickle brine. I had a bite, didn't comment on it, and then had a lot of everything else, making sure to point out how tasty the tuna sushi was, for instance.

upupdowndown
01-23-2010, 05:51 PM
My friend will not eat any meat that is still on the bone. Ribs, wings, some steak, all off the menu. She tried to humor me at a bbq I was hosting and tried to have some ribs, but ended up throwing up (politely).

God, my husband has this hangup, and it's annoying. I can still make pork chops and stuff, but any little pieces like wings will not be eaten by him at all.

John
01-24-2010, 12:23 AM
Lengua is awesome when they fry it after boiling it.

That sounds wonderful. I definitely want to go to a Grant bbq, and sample all these southern dishes you talk about. Closest I can get is Mrs. White's Golden Rule Cafe. (http://mrswhitesgoldenrulecafe.com/) Good soul food, and their "gimmick" is they don't give you a bill when you leave. You tell them what you've had, and they bill you accordingly.

Mrs. White's son operates another restaurant a couple miles away, Lo-Lo's Chicken & Waffles. Two great tastes that go surprisingly well together. I took a date there a few years ago, and had Charles Barkley and Amare Stoudamire at the next table. The Suns game ended early, and they kept the place open later than usual, so the famous dudes + entourage could eat. Helped with my date as well. I guess knowing where the famous people sometimes eat is sexy.

Anyway, on topic. Picky eaters: boo. Sorry all!

Dadgum Roi
01-24-2010, 06:26 AM
That sounds wonderful.


I think that is how it's usually done in Mexico, but most places here just boil it, it seems. I know of one place that has the killer lengua, and they fry it until it's a little crisp. Kind of like carnitas, I suppose.


I definitely want to go to a Grant bbq, and sample all these southern dishes you talk about.


First you'll have to learn to call it a "cook out". "Barbecue" in North Carolina is a noun that refers to chopped, slow smoked pork. If you cook a whole hog and people eat by pulling the meat off, that's a pig pickin'. But if you chop the meat like you would get from a restaurant, that's a cook out at which barbecue is being served. This is starting to sound a bit like how the Inuit have 50 different words for snow...

Paul le Fou
01-24-2010, 08:10 AM
I was a hugely picky eater as a kid. I didn't even eat cheese on my burgers for the longest time, ketchup until high school, pickles until college, etc. It kind of gradually ramped up and up until I was in Japan and didn't blink to put a raw slice of octopus in my mouth that I realized I didn't count as a picky eater anymore.

I'll try anything once, and will readily eat just about anything, but there are definitely things I straight up do not like. Broccoli is the biggest one. I just cannot stand the flavor of broccoli in, on, or around anything. I'll still eat it, though!



Being picky is definitely psychological, but then again so is whether you enjoy a flavor or not, so that's not like a damning indictment. Not liking foods is fine with me, if not a little mysterious. But when people refuse to try something new, something they've never had before, just because it "sounds" bad... yeah, I'm with Grant.



One time, in bartending class, two of the guys were talking about how they stop in my town for food on the way home from their long commute and wanted something besides Arby's.
Me: There's a great falafel place in town.
Them: Falafel? What's that?
Me: It's these fried patties of like ground-up chickpeas and herbs and stuff.
Them: Does it have meat in it?
Me: ...no, it doesn't, but it's still-
Them: No thanks, not interested.
Other girl: Never even heard of it. Where's that from, anyway?
Me: It's Lebanese.
Girl: Yeah, we don't go for that Chinese/Japanese stuff.

I sighed and gave up.

The falafel place went out of business.

Dadgum Roi
01-24-2010, 08:35 AM
I'll try anything once, and will readily eat just about anything, but there are definitely things I straight up do not like. Broccoli is the biggest one. I just cannot stand the flavor of broccoli in, on, or around anything. I'll still eat it, though!

I always thought that I hated broccoli. A week or so ago, I got a vegetarian Thai stir fry that had a bunch of it(this was not noted on the menu description). It was really good, and I ate all of it!

estragon
01-24-2010, 08:51 AM
I always thought that I hated broccoli. A week or so ago, I got a vegetarian Thai stir fry that had a bunch of it(this was not noted on the menu description). It was really good, and I ate all of it!

Broccoli is love.

Paul le Fou
01-24-2010, 09:14 AM
Estragon, what is your opinion on shishamo? Specifically, of course, komochi shishamo. That is another one of those things I just cannot get into.

estragon
01-24-2010, 09:20 AM
It's all right. I probably wouldn't ever order/make it if I was alone, but when it comes out at an izakaya or whatever with a big groups of friends where everybody's ordering food for everyone, I definitely eat it. It's not my favorite fish in the world, but it's not bad either. I'm okay with putting fish with eyeballs in my mouth.

spineshark
01-24-2010, 12:10 PM
Broccoli is love.
Yeah, I'm pretty sure I've never not liked broccoli. In the past few years, though, it's become basically impossible to get the really good...kind?...that you don't have to peel, at least where I am. It's frustrating, because it makes preparing it a lot more work, but still worth it.

Red Hedgehog
01-24-2010, 06:33 PM
Between Grant and destro, everything I've wanted to say in this thread has been said. So... thanks guys.

Paul le Fou
01-25-2010, 08:32 AM
I don't like the heads, but that's not even what bothers me. It's the eggs. Oh god, the eggs. I just... no, I just can't.

NevznachaY
01-25-2010, 09:42 AM
C'mon, people. You eat bird eggs, don't you?

Wolfgang
01-25-2010, 10:14 AM
Me: There's a great falafel place in town.
Them: Falafel? What's that?
Me: It's these fried patties of like ground-up chickpeas and herbs and stuff.
Them: Does it have meat in it?
Me: ...no, it doesn't, but it's still-
Them: No thanks, not interested.
Other girl: Never even heard of it. Where's that from, anyway?
Me: It's Lebanese.
Girl: Yeah, we don't go for that Chinese/Japanese stuff.



Helen: Hmm, Pita. Well, I don't know about food from the Middle East. Isn't that whole area a little iffy?
Hostess: Hey, I'm no geographer. You and I -- why don't we call it pocket bread, huh?
Maude: Umm, what's tahini?
Hostess: Flavor sauce.
Edna: And falafel?
Hostess: Crunch patties.
Helen: So, we'd be selling foreign...
Hostess: Specialty foods. Here, try a Ben Franklin.
Helen: Mmm, that is good. What's in it?
Chef: Tabbouleh and rezmi-kabob.
Hostess: Uh, th-that's our chef... Christopher.

Paul le Fou
01-26-2010, 08:18 AM
C'mon, people. You eat bird eggs, don't you?

fish eggs and bird eggs are very different creatures. And it's not even that I don't like fish eggs - I'll eat them in most things, even if I'm not a big fan of the flavor (a flavor and texture, I remind you, very different from bird eggs). But a small whole fried fish full of eggs? And these eggs in particular... no, no. I won't.

NevznachaY
01-27-2010, 03:11 AM
fish eggs and bird eggs are very different creatures. And it's not even that I don't like fish eggs - I'll eat them in most things, even if I'm not a big fan of the flavor (a flavor and texture, I remind you, very different from bird eggs). But a small whole fried fish full of eggs? And these eggs in particular... no, no. I won't.

Yeah, I thought it was some ideological thing.

That said, often it's very hard to get roe off of shrimps. Do you avoid those as well?

Büge
02-12-2010, 10:35 AM
Is that the little black string that goes along the outside of shrimps? Because I've known people who won't eat shrimp for that reason alone.

I, on the other hand, used to eat shrimp whole, tail and all, before I went vegan. And veganism, I suppose, could be interpreted as picky eating....

Luana
02-12-2010, 10:45 AM
fish eggs and bird eggs are very different creatures.

Hell, bird eggs and bird eggs are very different creatures. I used to love quail eggs when I was a child, getting excited as my mother brought out a can to use in whatever dish she was cooking, but now my stomach turns at the thought of them. I will maybe, maybe eat them in a Filipino-style meatloaf, but it's not happening otherwise.

Also in the realm of bird eggs and bird eggs? Balut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut_(egg)).

Balrog
02-12-2010, 10:46 AM
I like eating raisins and nuts but I can't stand when people put them in desserts. Nuts ruin cookies and raisins ruin oatmeal cookies and cinnamon rolls fo sho. The worst is when you can't see them and you take a big bite and it's rife those nasty things.

Dadgum Roi
02-12-2010, 11:18 AM
Start off with things that incorporate something you're already accustomed to, but use different spices/cooking method/etc. Start off with small amounts. If you eat the same couple of things over and over, you may have a genuine physiological sensitivity to some things. Think how vegetarians can get sick from eating meat.

I used to be a really picky eater and got over it by being terrified of offending people who were hosting me in a foreign country. After I ended up liking most of the stuff they gave me, I realized it had mostly been in my head.

mopinks
02-12-2010, 02:33 PM
I was an insanely picky eater up until I was 19 or so, when I finally forced myself to try sushi. after that, the floodgates were open.

I used to get the most horrified looks when I'd tell people I didn't like Chinese food.

NevznachaY
02-12-2010, 03:22 PM
Is that the little black string that goes along the outside of shrimps? Because I've known people who won't eat shrimp for that reason alone.

I, on the other hand, used to eat shrimp whole, tail and all, before I went vegan. And veganism, I suppose, could be interpreted as picky eating....

No, these are little spherical things.

Rosencrantz
02-12-2010, 03:42 PM
I didn't notice this thread until now because I don't come into this subforum much, because (you guessed it) I'm an incredibly picky eater. The thing is, I want to change, but it's really hard--nearly everything outside the four or five things I eat tastes awful to me, and I can barely even stomach the smell. When I've tried to expand my range, I end up gagging, which is intensely embarrassing if I'm out with anyone.

Does anyone else have/had this problem? How do you deal with it, or if you managed to get over it, how did you do that?

This sounds a hell of a lot like me. Um, this doesn't work in a lot of situations, but if there IS something on your plate that do like eating, you could try to take bites that combine the food you like with some food you don't like. Apart from that, this is a problem that I have to face as well when I am forced to eat something I absolutely don't like.

Büge
02-12-2010, 04:05 PM
Also in the realm of bird eggs and bird eggs? Balut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut_(egg)).

This reminds me of the time I was making breakfast with my friend and one of the eggs had a hideous clot of blood in it. It's one of the reasons I'm vegan.

Hell, bird eggs and bird eggs are very different creatures. I used to love quail eggs when I was a child, getting excited as my mother brought out a can to use in whatever dish she was cooking, but now my stomach turns at the thought of them. I will maybe, maybe eat them in a Filipino-style meatloaf, but it's not happening otherwise.

You could say you... quail at the thought of eating one.

estragon
03-01-2010, 06:23 PM
I've always been a finicky, picky eater. I've gotten better throughout the years and I'm trying/eating things I normally wouldn't but there's still a lot of foods I refuse to eat. Salad? Why the hell would I want to eat some leaves and vegetables slathered in sauce? No thanks. I'll order the soup.

I hate like pickles. I'm starting to now realize why people put mayonnaise on their sandwiches. Mustard is tolerable but in very small doses. Tuna Salad and Egg Salad and all of those other "salads" can go to hell. I hate onions. I don't mind if something is cooked with onion powder or if they're small enough and cooked so that their flavor isn't totally noticeable when I bite into it. Oddly enough, I don't mind onions rings. Sauerkraut? Euuuugh, man, how the hell do you people eat that stuff? I pretty much stay away from all vegetables. I don't really like most fruits either and I hate how people think everything taste better with a banana thrown in it; but I do eat them on occasion and one of my guilty pleasures is going to Jamba Juice.

I tried sushi once because I feel feeling adventurous. I made a weird face in front of the sushi chef and inadvertently offended him, even though I though I tried to be very discreet about it. Whoops.

Wow, it sucks to be you.

Sure sounds like it.

Daikaiju
03-06-2010, 02:06 PM
Is that the little black string that goes along the outside of shrimps? Because I've known people who won't eat shrimp for that reason alone.

From recipetips.com (http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--1239/how-to-prepare-and-devein-shrimp.asp)The black vein that runs along the back of shrimp is the digestive tract. Typically, whether veins are in or out, seldom is there a flavor difference unless the vein is large and contains a high volume of grit and digested material. It is removed more for the appearance than taste. The decision to remove the digestive tract is based on personal preference.

Rosencrantz
05-20-2010, 07:28 PM
Reviving this thread because my wife was just watching Dr. Oz while I was on the computer, and he had a bit about why some people are picky eaters. As it turns out, most picky eaters are what they call "super tasters" because they are extra sensitive to taste, and can taste things that most other people cannot. He said that about 25% of people are, in various degrees, "super tasters", 50 are "average tasters", and 25% are "non-tasters". Among other things, "non-tasters" are much, much less sensitive to spices, so those people who love to put really spicy stuff on their food tend to fall into this category.

So, fellow picky eaters, don't fret -- we're much better at tasting stuff than others!

Kate or Die!
05-20-2010, 08:36 PM
Holy cow this is the thread for me! Not only am I picky, but my pickyness can be completely arbitrary...for example, I eat mozzarella sticks, but scrape the cheese off of my pizza; I'll eat chocolate ice cream, but not pale-colored ice cream; I love croissants but won't eat vegetables if they have a drop of butter on them. And now that I'm in the throes of morning (aka all day) sickness, my diet has been whittled down to a super-short list:

Lettuce and tomato on a roll
Mozzarella sticks
Chocolate peanut butter ice cream with rainbow jimmies from Carvel
Plain-ass vegetables
Orange juice
Dry cereal

Kirin
05-21-2010, 08:04 AM
As it turns out, most picky eaters are what they call "super tasters" because they are extra sensitive to taste, and can taste things that most other people cannot.

Everything I need to know I learned from They Might Be Giants.

Ethan
05-21-2010, 08:35 AM
I tasted a PTC paper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylthiocarbamide) once and it was intensely bitter to me, implying that I am a "taster" to some significant degree. I'll still eat pretty much anything. So I don't think genes account for everything.

Dadgum Roi
05-21-2010, 09:12 AM
I tasted a PTC paper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylthiocarbamide) once and it was intensely bitter to me, implying that I am a "taster" to some significant degree. I'll still eat pretty much anything. So I don't think genes account for everything.

The whole thing about 25% being non-tasters and thus liking spicy food strikes me as bullshit, given that there are whole countries/cultures where spicy and well-spiced foods are broadly popular.

MCBanjoMike
05-21-2010, 12:17 PM
I'm a fairly picky eater (though I'm more open-minded than I used to be), and I think that I do have a pretty strong sense of taste. I definitely have a strong sense of smell, which I imagine plays into things as well. That said, I do like spicy food - although I tend to avoid stuff that's designed explicitly to burn to skin off your tongue. Still, a good Indian meal is delicious, if sometimes painful to eat.

Violentvixen
05-21-2010, 12:43 PM
The whole thing about 25% being non-tasters and thus liking spicy food strikes me as bullshit, given that there are whole countries/cultures where spicy and well-spiced foods are broadly popular.

Why is this hard to believe? It only supports the idea that everyone in the same area has the same mutation since they've likely all bred with each other at some point.

Kylie
05-21-2010, 01:18 PM
Being a supertaster doesn't mean you can't enjoy spicy food, or that you can't grow up eating it as a part of a culture that does. It just means you pick up subtleties in the food that other people can't catch, and it means you won't have to salt or spice quite so hard to make food interesting.

A genetic marker can exist whether or not you exist in a culture where spicy food is deeply ingrained, just like plenty of lactose-intolerant cultures eat cheeseburgers.

Dadgum Roi
05-21-2010, 02:10 PM
Why is this hard to believe? It only supports the idea that everyone in the same area has the same mutation since they've likely all bred with each other at some point.

I just doubt that genetics is the primary factor here. You build up a tolerance to capsaicin and other spices just like you do for alcohol.

Kylie
05-21-2010, 02:46 PM
Genetics can explain a dislike for, or lack of need for, capsaicin. But that doesn't mean you can't consume and enjoy. Raw onion, and many bitter vegetables, are another line -- tasters usually can't stand them raw, but there are people -- my brother in law is an example -- who can eat a raw onion like an apple, because they can't taste the sharp bitterness in it. I'm willing to believe that ability to taste is a genetic disposition separate from personal and cultural preferences.

Belmont
06-02-2010, 10:26 PM
Does anyone have any advice for a picky eater who wants to start eating healthier? You can reference back to an earlier post to see exactly what kind of person you're dealing with here.

I am a victim of fast food, because its just so dang convenient.

Lady
04-03-2011, 04:39 PM
My friend will not eat any meat that is still on the bone. Ribs, wings, some steak, all off the menu. She tried to humor me at a bbq I was hosting and tried to have some ribs, but ended up throwing up (politely).
God, my husband has this hangup, and it's annoying. I can still make pork chops and stuff, but any little pieces like wings will not be eaten by him at all.God, my husband has this hangup, and it's annoying. I can still make pork chops and stuff, but any little pieces like wings will not be eaten by him at all.
[late]
I have this issue. I've tried to eat ribs, felt very uncomfortable during and after eating (although I didn't throw up). It was delicious, but I could not get over the texture of ripping flesh apart with my teeth and tearing it off the bone.

Why does this offend so many people. It ultimately means there's more delicious rib meat for you.

Pajaro Pete
04-03-2011, 04:57 PM
[late]
I have this issue. I've tried to eat ribs, felt very uncomfortable during and after eating (although I didn't throw up). It was delicious, but I could not get over the texture of ripping flesh apart with my teeth and tearing it off the bone.

Why does this offend so many people. It ultimately means there's more delicious rib meat for you.

Mmm mmm good. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocmzDO-vBR8&feature=player_detailpage#t=77s)

Kishi
04-03-2011, 04:59 PM
Man, don't post Evangelion spoilers at my girlfriend.

Pajaro Pete
04-03-2011, 05:02 PM
Come on, it's barely understandable for people who've actually watched the series.

Lady
04-03-2011, 05:19 PM
it's ok, i ignore youtube links as a rule

Wolfgang
04-03-2011, 08:22 PM
Hat really is the best policy.

Adrenaline
04-04-2011, 12:29 PM
Picky eaters make me fucking sick

Nodal
04-04-2011, 12:35 PM
One time Adrenaline came over my house and threw out all the food that he deemed too mainstream.

Adrenaline
04-04-2011, 12:49 PM
What were you even thinking having bread in your kitchen

Nodal
04-04-2011, 12:50 PM
What were you even thinking having bread in your kitchen

But I made it myself! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHK0uFb6Vzw)

Glass Knuckle
04-15-2011, 08:29 AM
I'm extremely picky in the way I prefer to eat things, but I'm more willing to try other things if they're offered to me than I used to be. In general, I like to keep things very simple.

When ordering burgers or sandwiches, I like to stick to meat, cheese, and bread. If I really like the meat, I'll probably skip the cheese too and just salt it a little.

I do not like condiments or dipping sauces except for buffalo, barbecue, and ketchup. The only thing I use ketchup for is fries, and then only if they're not very good. Homemade dip is excluded, as is that wonderful stuff Outback gives you with a bloomin' onion.

Soup is right out. Gollum's reaction to Sam making rabbit stew is pretty accurate for me. I don't get why you'd take what could otherwise be a good meal and blend it all together with water, or turn it into something with the consistency of baby food.

I can accept cassaroles or similar things, but again I would rather have a cooked piece of chicken with vegatables on the side than mix them up in something.

As wtih the OP, I don't like any of the usual Thanksgiving food except the meat, corn or green beans, and bread rolls. I will never add gravy to meat.

Two things I'm extremely adventurous with are Chinese food and anything from the ocean. Chinese dishes usually have think sauce and cook most of the liquid out, so everything on the plate tastes like it should and not like a mix of everything it was cooked with. I love most seafood unless it's particularly slimy, like an oyster in the shell. Catfish is about my limit for that. Lightly breaded Calamari is a favorite.

Beefy Hits
04-19-2011, 11:39 AM
I was really bad when I was a kid, but I've gotten better.

I don't like black licorice, Whole tomatoes, Ham, sweet potatoes.

Lady
04-19-2011, 08:42 PM
beefy hits, try sweet potato fries. I used to not like sweet potatoes either, but now I'm all over them because of the fries.

As an example of how my palate has opened up, I ate some chicken cordon bleu tonight, despite initially finding it disgusting to mix meats like that. (I just buried it in the over-garlicked potatoes to hide the texture and the taste)

Karzac
04-19-2011, 09:17 PM
beefy hits, try sweet potato fries. I used to not like sweet potatoes either, but now I'm all over them because of the fries.

As an example of how my palate has opened up, I ate some chicken cordon bleu tonight, despite initially finding it disgusting to mix meats like that. (I just buried it in the over-garlicked potatoes to hide the texture and the taste)

Oh man, Chicken Cordon Bleu is the best. I haven't had it in so long. Ham/bacon pretty much improves every meat dish.

Daikaiju
04-29-2011, 06:23 PM
I was really bad when I was a kid, but I've gotten better.

I don't like black licorice, Whole tomatoes, Ham, sweet potatoes.

Dunno about those middle two, but I'm with you on the first and last. To be fair however, I don't think I hate sweet potatoes so much as how they're usually prepared.

Beefy Hits
05-05-2011, 02:01 PM
By the way, if you hate Ham, you automatically hate Canadian Bacon.

taosterman
07-03-2012, 01:07 PM
Interview with a reformed picky eater. (http://blogs.kqed.org/bayareabites/2012/07/02/q-a-with-stephanie-v-w-lucianovic-author-of-suffering-succotash-a-picky-eater%E2%80%99s-quest-to-understand-why-we-hate-the-foods-we-hate/)

Really, I mostly just wanted to revive this thread.

Rosencrantz
07-03-2012, 01:18 PM
That sounds like a cool book. I've got to check that out sometime.

LBD_Nytetrayn
07-04-2012, 12:02 PM
Indeed; sounds right up my alley.

Wolfgang
07-06-2012, 10:40 PM
Wolfgal has gotten much better than she used to be. She now likes all kinds of fish, and will eat a lot of vegetables if cooked properly, which is to say roasted, grilled or stir fried. Broccoli, asparagus, green beans and bell peppers make frequent appearances at our meal times. No more chicken finger/french fry dinners!

She still hates a lot of vegetables, though, like cucumbers and tomatoes (really, anything served raw is out). And she still won't touch fruit or cheese (unless it's on pizza) to save her life.

Falselogic
07-06-2012, 10:43 PM
Wolfgal has gotten much better than she used to be. She now likes all kinds of fish, and will eat a lot of vegetables if cooked properly, which is to say roasted, grilled or stir fried. Broccoli, asparagus, green beans and bell peppers make frequent appearances at our meal times. No more chicken finger/french fry dinners!

She still hates a lot of vegetables, though, like cucumbers and tomatoes (really, anything served raw is out). And she still won't touch fruit or cheese (unless it's on pizza) to save her life.

What a sad, sad existence she must live not knowing the joys of fresh fruits and vegetables =)

Lady
07-06-2012, 10:54 PM
how do you serve the cucumbers

Wolfgang
07-08-2012, 01:40 PM
in a dish or bowl

Lady
07-08-2012, 08:57 PM
try salting them

estragon
07-08-2012, 09:36 PM
try putting them in hendrick's gin (http://www.cookingthreetimes.com/gin-and-tonic-with-fresh-cucumber/)

Wolfgang
07-09-2012, 01:02 AM
Recently I had a pimms cup and let me tell you that was a good cucumber serve.

Red Hedgehog
07-09-2012, 09:21 AM
Wolfgal has gotten much better than she used to be. She now likes all kinds of fish, and will eat a lot of vegetables if cooked properly, which is to say roasted, grilled or stir fried. Broccoli, asparagus, green beans and bell peppers make frequent appearances at our meal times. No more chicken finger/french fry dinners!

This is really awesome. Still a shame about the lack of fresh fruits and vegetables, but it's great how far she's come.

Pajaro Pete
07-09-2012, 08:37 PM
She still hates a lot of vegetables, though, like cucumbers and tomatoes (really, anything served raw is out)

Raw cucumbers and raw tomatoes are really gross so she's right to not like them. Does she eat cooked tomatoes and or pickled cucumbers (common name: pickles)?

mopinks
07-09-2012, 08:49 PM
Japanese-style lightly pickled cucumbers are the ultimate true form of the cucumber.

ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTES

Büge
07-09-2012, 09:24 PM
Raw cucumbers and raw tomatoes are really gross so she's right to not like them.

clearly you've never had fresh tomatoes lightly sprinkled with sea salt and cracked pepper

LBD_Nytetrayn
07-10-2012, 12:58 AM
Of the veggies I can eat, I tend to prefer many raw, including cucumbers and carrots. Spinach, too.

Kirin
07-10-2012, 10:48 AM
Yeah, I much prefer my carrots crunchy and will only eat spinach in baby, salad form. Cooked greens are mushy and gross. And I'm not even sure why or how anyone would cook a cucumber.

(Mushrooms, on the other hand, I prefer nicely sauteed or grilled. And unless they're some amazing heirloom variety, tomatoes belong in a sauce.)

Matchstick
07-10-2012, 11:01 AM
And unless they're some amazing heirloom variety, tomatoes belong in a sauce.)

Bruschetta would like a word with you.

estragon
07-10-2012, 11:11 AM
Bruschetta would like a word with you.

I think bruschetta would like a word with you, if you're using the typical kind of supermarket tomatoes that are bred to look red and be tasteless instead of heirlooms.

Red Hedgehog
07-10-2012, 11:37 AM
I think bruschetta would like a word with you, if you're using the typical kind of supermarket tomatoes that are bred to look red and be tasteless instead of heirlooms.

Man, unless you're living in a wasteland there are plenty of tomatoes besides heirlooms that provide a nice flavor on bruschetta and aren't the supermarket "slicing tomatoes" or whatever the hell they call those tasteless things.

estragon
07-10-2012, 11:49 AM
Man, unless you're living in a wasteland there are plenty of tomatoes besides heirlooms that provide a nice flavor on bruschetta and aren't the supermarket "slicing tomatoes" or whatever the hell they call those tasteless things.

I guess I'm wrong on tomato terminology, then. I thought heirloom was a broad term that indicated most of those "plenty of tomatoes" that "provide a nice flavor."

Alixsar
07-10-2012, 02:23 PM
Oh my God. I'd never noticed this thread before and I just did and skimming through it I want to punch a hole in the universe. Picky eaters, man. Fucking picky eaters. How do you not like tomatoes?! THEYRE FUCKING TOMATOES WHAT THE CRAP

Rosencrantz
07-10-2012, 03:01 PM
Oh my God. I'd never noticed this thread before and I just did and skimming through it I want to punch a hole in the universe. Picky eaters, man. Fucking picky eaters. How do you not like tomatoes?! THEYRE FUCKING TOMATOES WHAT THE CRAP

For the record, I do like tomatoes, but man: nobody wants to be a picky eater. It sucks.

Torzelbaum
07-10-2012, 03:37 PM
Interview with a reformed picky eater. (http://blogs.kqed.org/bayareabites/2012/07/02/q-a-with-stephanie-v-w-lucianovic-author-of-suffering-succotash-a-picky-eater%E2%80%99s-quest-to-understand-why-we-hate-the-foods-we-hate/)

How do you not like tomatoes?!Clearly, you need to read the book mentioned in the link taosterman posted.

Red Hedgehog
07-10-2012, 03:44 PM
I guess I'm wrong on tomato terminology, then. I thought heirloom was a broad term that indicated most of those "plenty of tomatoes" that "provide a nice flavor."

Heirloom just means old, or generally "not created since the end of world war II" like most agriculture consumed in the western world has been. That said, there are plenty of varieties of plum tomatoes and beefsteak tomatoes and what have you that aren't heirloom but are still open-pollinated and have been bred for taste rather than color.

taosterman
07-10-2012, 05:05 PM
Oh my God. I'd never noticed this thread before and I just did and skimming through it I want to punch a hole in the universe. Picky eaters, man. Fucking picky eaters. How do you not like tomatoes?! THEYRE FUCKING TOMATOES WHAT THE CRAP

Tomatoes in whole or sliced form are pretty grody. Do literally anything else to them and they're sublime. I can't explain it either.

mopinks
07-10-2012, 05:32 PM
tomatoes are most definitely a thing I thought I didn't like until I actually had A Good One

I've always liked cherry tomatoes, though! cherry tomatoes are cool.

Alixsar
07-10-2012, 08:21 PM
Y'all are crazy. Tomatoes are great. At worst, they don't taste like anything, and at best, they are a symphony of flavor.

mopinks
07-10-2012, 08:32 PM
no, at worst they don't taste like anything and ooze their flavorless slime all over your burger, ruining everything else

Wolfgang
07-10-2012, 10:21 PM
Y'all are crazy. Tomatoes are great. At worst, they taste like salty, metallic phlegm like when you have a really bad head cold, and swallow some down the back of your throat

Paul le Fou
07-10-2012, 10:25 PM
raw tomato (yes even the good ones, step off my grill dog) is one of the few things I'm just not that big a fan of, and avoid it in salads or on sandwiches. But cooked and/or seasoned they're pretty good! I like bruschetta and stuff just fine!

shivam
07-10-2012, 10:40 PM
tomatoes are most definitely a thing I thought I didn't like until I actually had A Good One

I've always liked cherry tomatoes, though! cherry tomatoes are cool.

this right here.

LBD_Nytetrayn
07-11-2012, 02:26 AM
Tomatoes depend on my mood, though I prefer them when they're-- how do I put it? Nice and fruity, rather than seedy and runny and mushy.

Comb Stranger
07-11-2012, 02:32 AM
Fresh diced tomatoes are a delicious topping. Big mushy slabs of 'em... not a fan. The mouthfeel is all wrong.

Alixsar
07-11-2012, 09:51 AM
There is such a thing as a bad tomato, you know. It seems like what a lot of you are complaining about is that you've eaten old tomatoes in something before and you didn't like it. I don't like old tomatoes either because they are old. Fresh > Not Fresh is true for basically everything ever.

For the record, I do like tomatoes, but man: nobody wants to be a picky eater. It sucks.

Hey, you know how you can stop being a picky eater? By eating food. It's not hard. Seriously, if you have anxiety about eating then you need to get help soon and get over your shit and become a normal person. There's no reason to be a picky eater, unless if it's for health/religious reasons or you're a vegetarian or something.

Lady
07-11-2012, 07:56 PM
Or it tastes bad.

Wolfgang
07-12-2012, 12:11 AM
Seriously, if you have anxiety about eating then you need to get help soon and get over your shit and become a normal person.

You know what sounds like a really fun thing to do? A thing that sounds fun to do is spend time looking for a therapist that will agree to help you get over being picky, then spending time every week going to those sessions, and then also paying money for them/convincing your insurer to pay. Or you could just not have tomatoes on your burger.

Serephine
07-12-2012, 01:50 AM
>alixsar.thread

Rosencrantz
07-12-2012, 09:16 AM
Hey, you know how you can stop being a picky eater? By eating food. It's not hard. Seriously, if you have anxiety about eating then you need to get help soon and get over your shit and become a normal person. There's no reason to be a picky eater, unless if it's for health/religious reasons or you're a vegetarian or something.

Man, there's not one trace of anxiety, except if a picky eater is at a friend's house or something and the meal that's offered is full of food that they don't like. I make a point of trying every new thing that is offered to me, and in situations like I mentioned, I always accept what's being offered and do my best to eat it. The problem has nothing to do with "I'm scared of new things!", it's "God damn, so many things taste completely awful to me." Picky eaters are more accurately (but just as stupidly) called "Supertasters" (http://bodyodd.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2010/05/11/4380014-being-a-supertaster-is-no-piece-of-cake?lite) because we simply taste things more strongly.

Wolfgang
07-12-2012, 10:37 AM
>alixsar.thread

Why are nerds incapable of empathy? This is not a rhetorical question.

Rosencrantz
07-12-2012, 10:41 AM
Why are nerds incapable of empathy? This is not a rhetorical question.

Because many of them were treated poorly by their peers growing up and now they have a safe environment to act however they want without consequence.

Alixsar
07-12-2012, 11:49 AM
Man, there's not one trace of anxiety, except if a picky eater is at a friend's house or something and the meal that's offered is full of food that they don't like. I make a point of trying every new thing that is offered to me, and in situations like I mentioned, I always accept what's being offered and do my best to eat it. The problem has nothing to do with "I'm scared of new things!", it's "God damn, so many things taste completely awful to me." Picky eaters are more accurately (but just as stupidly) called "Supertasters" (http://bodyodd.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2010/05/11/4380014-being-a-supertaster-is-no-piece-of-cake?lite) because we simply taste things more strongly.

Here's the thing; I don't think that makes you a picky eater. Everyone has likes/dislikes. So if you have double neo hyper taste or whatever, then that's one thing. And that's unfortunate and that's something I had never heard of, and that sucks.

But picky eaters, to me, are people who don't what you do. At least you're trying. Picky eaters are people who don't try new things. They're my friend who ONLY eats pepperoni pizza. No other toppings, ever. That's just what he likes so he never tries any other pizza ever. That's awful. Trying new foods, and especially trying new foods with friends and talking about it, is one of my favorite things on this Earth. People shouldn't deny themselves new experiences just because of past, bad experiences. But people do it, and it's weirdly frustrating to me.

Büge
07-12-2012, 01:49 PM
So what about trying new foods that exist within a narrow band of criteria? Vegetarians, for example.

shivam
07-12-2012, 02:06 PM
i used to hate tofu and mushrooms and i'm a vegetarian. But then i lived in a place where that was all i could eat, and i basically forced myself to start trying foods that fit into the category of 'things ok for me to eat', and now i'm no longer picky, and in fact able to enjoy and appreciate all sorts of weird shit.

LBD_Nytetrayn
07-14-2012, 12:58 PM
Man, there's not one trace of anxiety, except if a picky eater is at a friend's house or something and the meal that's offered is full of food that they don't like. I make a point of trying every new thing that is offered to me, and in situations like I mentioned, I always accept what's being offered and do my best to eat it. The problem has nothing to do with "I'm scared of new things!", it's "God damn, so many things taste completely awful to me." Picky eaters are more accurately (but just as stupidly) called "Supertasters" (http://bodyodd.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2010/05/11/4380014-being-a-supertaster-is-no-piece-of-cake?lite) because we simply taste things more strongly.

Never heard of that, but it makes sense to me.

Red Hedgehog
07-14-2012, 07:18 PM
Man, there's not one trace of anxiety, except if a picky eater is at a friend's house or something and the meal that's offered is full of food that they don't like. I make a point of trying every new thing that is offered to me, and in situations like I mentioned, I always accept what's being offered and do my best to eat it. The problem has nothing to do with "I'm scared of new things!", it's "God damn, so many things taste completely awful to me." Picky eaters are more accurately (but just as stupidly) called "Supertasters" (http://bodyodd.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2010/05/11/4380014-being-a-supertaster-is-no-piece-of-cake?lite) because we simply taste things more strongly.

I'm sympathetic to supertasters, but it's certainly not the case that all picky eaters are supertasters as seen by those are able to "get over it".

EDIT: Also I think the BBC survey linked is that article is bollocks as it said I'm somewhere between a supertaster and a normal taster. If anything, I'm closer to nontaster than not.

pencils
07-14-2012, 08:41 PM
i don't consider myself a picky eater but cilantro tastes like really weird chemicals to me, and it's always littered all over my delicious chipotle burritos. i can't avoid it, they put it in the rice, the corn, it's all over the place. i've read that some people are predisposed to taste soap when they eat cilantro... how stupid!

Büge
07-14-2012, 09:31 PM
I like cilantro, but I acknowledge that it's strong-tasting.

Alixsar
07-14-2012, 10:15 PM
Cilantro is similar but different from "supertasters". Some people literally taste it differently, but as far as I know, the people who have that happen only have that problem with cilantro and nothing else. I'm not sure though. I wouldn't be surprised if there was overlap too.

Alex Scott
07-14-2012, 11:06 PM
I think for me it's a contamination anxiety, sort of similar to OCD. I always freak out a little when I bite on something that doesn't "belong" in my food.

Lumber Baron
07-15-2012, 12:13 AM
We've got a whole thread (http://www.talking-time.net/showthread.php?t=11578) about cilantro and other genetically influenced tastes.

LBD_Nytetrayn
07-15-2012, 01:10 AM
My biggest issue is with peppers and onions. And of the former, they're pretty much designed by nature to be unappealing to mammals.

So if I can't stand to eat something (smell is a little different; I like the smell on a pizza, for instance) which is essentially an irritant, does that really make me picky? I think not.

Bongo Bill
07-15-2012, 07:06 AM
I've got a very adventuresome palate but there are a few annoyingly common things that I just can't enjoy except under very unusual methods of preparation. The texture of shrimp is unmistakeable and upsetting. Oranges - or indeed any citrus stronger than lime - have an unpleasant tartness and are often too sweet as well. Nuts are good, breads are good, but nuts in bread just doesn't work. I've never had mayonnaise on anything that wouldn't have tasted better without it. And the entire concept of salad dressing is mystifying to me; why not just use vegetables that have flavor and texture?

Büge
07-15-2012, 09:16 AM
My biggest issue is with peppers and onions. And of the former, they're pretty much designed by nature to be unappealing to mammals.

You mean like, hot peppers, or...?

Violentvixen
07-15-2012, 10:30 AM
I'm sympathetic to supertasters, but it's certainly not the case that all picky eaters are supertasters as seen by those are able to "get over it".

Yeah, they're not necessarily related.

i don't consider myself a picky eater but cilantro tastes like really weird chemicals to me, and it's always littered all over my delicious chipotle burritos. i can't avoid it, they put it in the rice, the corn, it's all over the place. i've read that some people are predisposed to taste soap when they eat cilantro... how stupid!

Cilantro is similar but different from "supertasters". Some people literally taste it differently, but as far as I know, the people who have that happen only have that problem with cilantro and nothing else. I'm not sure though. I wouldn't be surprised if there was overlap too.

There's a gene for cilantro, one for kale/broccoli/etc and one for asparagus:

We've got a whole thread (http://www.talking-time.net/showthread.php?t=11578) about cilantro and other genetically influenced tastes.

Go to that thread and take the poll if you haven't.

rkdn42
07-15-2012, 11:33 AM
NOVA Sciencenow had a segment about a genetic basis for some picky eaters.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/body/science-picky-eaters.html

MagFlare
07-15-2012, 12:16 PM
And the entire concept of salad dressing is mystifying to me; why not just use vegetables that have flavor and texture?

Because there are vegetables that go really well with salad dressings. Romaine lettuce, for one. By itself, it feels like you're eating a mouthful of privet hedge. With a nice Caesar salad dressing and some croutons or sunflower seeds, it becomes something much greater.