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View Full Version : what is the best roast: a coffee thread


DemoWeasel
02-21-2010, 03:09 PM
Here's a thread for everything coffee related (except the morbid kind)! What brewing methods do you prefer? Do you take it black or with creamer? What are your favorite beans? Do you grind your own beans or do you buy the pre-ground stuff? Feel free to discuss drinks that use coffee in their creation!

My typical cuppa joe consists of preground Starbucks Christmas Blend with two packets of Equal and Cinnamon-Vanilla fat free CoffeeMate creamer.

It's good stuff!

ravinoff
02-21-2010, 03:19 PM
Irish coffee, otherwise I'd much rather have tea.

In other words I don't really care for coffee but put enough whiskey, sugar and cream in it and you might get me interested.

Marfy
02-21-2010, 03:21 PM
Black, except during Christmas time when CoffeeMate's peppermint mocha creamer is available. Grinding your own beans is absolutely amazing, but especially now that I live on my own I just get the cheapest shit available. :(

NevznachaY
02-21-2010, 03:22 PM
Didn't we have one of those a couple of months ago?

(Sorry to be That Guy).

DemoWeasel
02-21-2010, 03:24 PM
I have no idea.

NevznachaY
02-21-2010, 03:26 PM
Yeah. (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?p=617895)

(Not to discourage you, Fox-Boy Wonder).

Dizzy
02-21-2010, 03:32 PM
SDMX was right about you Shinji... as always.

I take it black now because I'm a manly man who's scared of sugar and calories.

When it comes to energy drinks I almost always choose the coffee versions for fear of acid reflux.

DemoWeasel
02-21-2010, 03:35 PM
Yeah. (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showthread.php?p=617895)

(Not to discourage you, Fox-Boy Wonder).

I hardly ever go into that subforum =P

(Also, I just wanted to use "what is the best roast" but thought that talking about roast turkey or roast beef would be dumb)

Aleryn
02-21-2010, 03:58 PM
Strong dark roast preference here. Wish I could find a lighter roast that didn't make me gag when taken black. I like medium to high quality stuff black, and the not so great (but great priced!) stuff with light flavored creamer. Like hazlenut in particular. Love my French Press over my drip maker, but rarely have the time for the 'french.

The occasional iced mocha is a good treat.

Trader Joes stores rock for Coffee.

Knight
02-21-2010, 04:28 PM
I take it black, and use pre-ground stuff, but I'm still trying to find a brand that I really like. There's always just something I don't really like about them, and I don't remember offhand which ones I've already tried, and I don't remember what I liked/disliked about them.

Oh well! I guess I'll grab a bag when I go to Walmart tonight and try posting about it, and maybe some of you coffee experts can give me some direction.

Matchstick
02-21-2010, 05:28 PM
Starbuck's coffee is shit pure and simple. Powdered creamer is as well. I take mine with sugar and milk. Generally, I only like it in the evening, especially after a good meal. As far as beans are concerned, I find Ethiopian Yergacheffee to be my favorite.

Ethan
02-21-2010, 05:53 PM
What brewing methods do you prefer?

Anything but drip. I favor the French press when I want black coffee and the Vietnamese steel filter when I want sweet coffee, but I'm also equipped with a Turkish ibrik and a moka pot when the need arises. I grind my own with a Capresso burr grinder. I like the Trader Joe's Scandinavian Blend in the press and Trung Nguyen beans for Vietnamese coffee. My next coffee-related implement will be one of these (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/Coffeemakers.htm).

Sadly, I seem to have lost my ability to handle caffeine within the last year. I get the shakes if I have coffee before the afternoon. Morning coffee really screws up my day. It has become an after-dinner thing for me.

liquid
02-21-2010, 09:23 PM
I like the crappy black stuff that comes out of a vending machine way too hot. That shit will wake you up.

Kirin
02-22-2010, 07:20 AM
I am the anti-purist. I drink froofy things full of cream and sugar and flavorings. Made out of Decaf because I've lost all tolerance to caffeine after giving up soda, and now it does unpleasant things to me.

My wife, however, buys nice beans from a local shop and makes french press stuff at home. She's also experimented with cold-brew and Turkish, which are both pretty tasty.

Daikaiju
02-22-2010, 11:32 AM
Gimme a light roast* from La Colombe in Center City, Philadelphia. perfection in a cup.

*Note! Lighter roasts have more caffeine!

Knight
04-11-2010, 10:52 AM
So after trying a few different brands and types of coffee, I have only found one that I truly enjoy: McDonald's coffee. It's kind of embarrassing, but it's just so damn good. I want to know what specific brand and flavor and type of roast they use, but Google has given me inconsistent answers. So I turn to you, Talking Time. Help! I must have it.

Kirin
04-12-2010, 07:57 AM
If you can't come up with a better answer sooner, I think a friend of mine actually worked at a McCafe for a while... she might know.

taosterman
04-13-2010, 03:20 PM
French press is the way to go for me, strong with half & half and sugar, stirred with a wooden spoon. I've also had roommates who have owned a moka pot and aeropress, and those methods are great as well, but not my favorite.

My relationship with coffee is kind of weird. I'm a fairly nervous person, so I've rarely felt "wired" like so many other people do, but it definitely has a psychological effect on me in that the day doesn't feel like it's really started before I've had a cup. Plus I really, really love the taste and always have.

Red Hedgehog
04-14-2010, 07:59 PM
So what's the deal with decaf? A lot of people hate on it. Is it because it tastes much worse than caffeinated coffee? I've never had it, but I would think coffee that tastes just as good but without caffeine would be pretty nice.

Kirin
04-15-2010, 07:53 AM
I drink decaf whenever I drink coffee now, because I lost my caffeine tolerance and it does terrible things to me. I didn't notice much difference in taste when I switched, but this is probably because my coffee drinks tend to be full of cream and sugar and extra flavors. I imagine someone who takes it black would have a much easier time noticing.

taosterman
04-15-2010, 11:00 AM
I was drinking decaf for a while for health reasons, and I got used to it, but it tastes like what I imagine replicator food must taste like. Not bad, per se, but just kind of empty.

Lady
04-16-2011, 02:59 PM
So, yesterday, my friends and I walked to the campus starbucks, and I saw that the recommended drink of the day was an "iced carmel macchiato", and I remarked "I wonder if I could get that frozen instead"

one of my friends turns to me and gives me this DEADLY SERIOUS look
"no, you can't do that, that's not what the drink is"

And I am totally confused because I just drink coffees that I know will be nummy and sweet like candy, and kinda ignore everything beyond that complexity of definition

But he proceeded to explain that "macchiato" refers to the process by which it is made, something to do with milk sitting on the bottom and espresso on top, and that if I wanted something frozen, it would have to be mixed(!!). So I asked why you couldn't crush the ice separately and then build the drink on this, and he shook his head and gave up on me.

Help me build my coffee cred. I don't speak espresso. WHAT IS THE MEANING OF ALL OF THIS

Mr. Sensible
04-16-2011, 03:30 PM
Help me build my coffee cred. I don't speak espresso. WHAT IS THE MEANING OF ALL OF THIS

The purpose is to justify the insane prices they pay at Starbucks for their snobbery-in-a-cup.

mablem8
04-16-2011, 04:10 PM
Here is a summary of the ingredients for the different drinks:
http://i.imgur.com/GxOOd.gif

And the table here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Espresso#Espresso-based_drinks) describes the order that the ingredients are added.

Dizzy
04-16-2011, 05:16 PM
The purpose is to justify the insane prices they pay at Starbucks for their snobbery-in-a-cup.

I don't think it's snobbery, I think it's like a religious cult you do not want to fuck with.

Violentvixen
04-16-2011, 05:21 PM
Here is a summary of the ingredients for the different drinks:
http://i.imgur.com/GxOOd.gif

And the table here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Espresso#Espresso-based_drinks) describes the order that the ingredients are added.

That's a really spiffy breakdown.

I have one of these and it's great:

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRdHn5MpElyNd6P_RJYk6cla96Nb0V7U-VCg1e2xOU8RcVhnKfi

Lady
04-16-2011, 05:44 PM
ye gods, and people can actually taste the difference between all of those?

For the example of my story, my "iced caramel macchiato" had white (milk foam?) on the bottom and brown (espresso?) on top. which is upside down from the chart :o

Mr. Sensible
04-16-2011, 06:24 PM
What's really amazing is that the only difference between a cafe latte and a cappuccino is the amount of steamed milk you use. Why not just say "extra steamed milk" when ordering a cappuccino? Why do we need to pretend it's an entirely different drink?

COFFEE RAAAAAGE

Wolfgang
04-16-2011, 06:49 PM
I have one of these and it's great:

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRdHn5MpElyNd6P_RJYk6cla96Nb0V7U-VCg1e2xOU8RcVhnKfi

My girlfriend swears by hers, says it's the most convenient appliance she owns.

HOWAYYVER - -

Did you know that when you drink coffee it turns your bones into a spongy, porous material, and that certain chemicals in coffee turn into bleach and hydrogen peroxide in your stomach once you drink theeeeeeem

Lady
04-16-2011, 06:51 PM
nothin' wrong with a little H2O2~~~~

Karzac
04-16-2011, 08:09 PM
What's really amazing is that the only difference between a cafe latte and a cappuccino is the amount of steamed milk you use. Why not just say "extra steamed milk" when ordering a cappuccino? Why do we need to pretend it's an entirely different drink?

COFFEE RAAAAAGE

Well, that wouldn't exactly be the same thing. With a cappucino, the foam is spread evenly throughout the drink. It's not just a little milk on the bottom and then a ton of foam on the top. In a good cappucino, all the milk will be foamy.

Lady, the guy you had was a douche and bad at his job. What he should have done was offered you a caramel frappucino (coffee blended with ice and caramel syrup), because that's what it sounds like you wanted.

Man, I shouldn't even be involved in this thread. I don't like coffee and haven't worked at Starbucks for a year. You should all just ignore me.

Violentvixen
04-17-2011, 11:24 AM
My girlfriend swears by hers, says it's the most convenient appliance she owns.

HOWAYYVER - -

Did you know that when you drink coffee it turns your bones into a spongy, porous material, and that certain chemicals in coffee turn into bleach and hydrogen peroxide in your stomach once you drink theeeeeeem

And it also inhibits your body's ability to uptake iron and stains your teeth. Eh.

I'm glad that coffee becomes more alkaline in my stomach, it's already at pH 1.2, my stomach could probably use some neutralizing. In seriousness, I haven't specifically heard that (and you may just be making it up, I have no idea), but it sounds like it might just be a normal digestion process.

Beefy Hits
04-20-2011, 02:11 PM
I could never get into coffee. To me, it's just hot water and doesn't taste like anything.

I understand it's an aquired taste like beer but I just can't get into and would rather drink Mt. Dew or something in the morning, or even hot chocolate.

The closest I'll go is cappachino.

Ethan
04-20-2011, 09:52 PM
Mt. Dew in the morning
Mt. Dew in the morning
Mt. Dew in the morning
http://i.imgur.com/awP8i.png

The-Bavis
04-22-2011, 11:39 AM
http://porcuswallabee.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/crab-juice1.jpg?w=168&h=300

Mr. Sensible
04-22-2011, 12:43 PM
That should be the slogan for every soda that's isn't Mountain Dew. Shit burns a hole right through my stomach.

I'd rather drink a $5 venti-latte-chino from Stardollars, and that's saying something.

Lady
04-22-2011, 08:42 PM
when working on my thesis this morning at school, I was kinda annoyed by a dude taking a test in the room with the coffee maker. However, I was not put out, which shows that despite the significant uptake in my caffeine consumption, I don't appear to have an addiction yet! Reassuring!

BodhiTraveller
04-23-2011, 10:53 AM
I love Donut shop coffee. It has so many advantages: its cheap, usually fresh, obtainable at four in the morning, and has the "donut shop coffee lid." You know, the one with the ridged opening that you sort of drink the coffee over. The extra surface area cools the coffee so you can ingest it drinkably warm when it has been poured scaldingly hot.

http://content.etilize.com/Large/1010048111.jpg

Who decided that drinking coffee from jellybean-sized holes was what all the cool kids were doing?

Kayin
10-08-2011, 02:22 PM
I just got a french press and some coarse ground beans. I have had my first cup and it's great.

ADVISE ME FURTHER ON WHAT I SHOULD DO WITH THIS WONDERFUL CONTRAPTION.

Daikaiju
10-08-2011, 02:39 PM
Clean out those used grounds.

Kayin
10-08-2011, 02:48 PM
Yeah, sadly it's a little annoying with how the fliter is made. They get hooked under this metal plate and it's hard to dig them out. If it wasn't for that, cleaning would be easy breezy.

Mr. Sensible
10-08-2011, 02:48 PM
Make red-eye gravy with the leftover grounds!

Oh, what to do with the french press...you could start mixing up grounds from different types of beans for MAXIMUM FLAVOR ENJOYMENT

Also you should be grinding your own beans if you're not already. You can get a decent electric spice grinder for around $20.

Kayin
10-08-2011, 02:55 PM
I've heard conflicting reports on that. While everything I've read says the best grinds are the freshest, but I've read a few places that it's better to get store ground than grind your self with a cheap grinder, since a cheap grinder just smacks shit with a blade, as opposed to using a burr. Any comment on that?

Mr. Sensible
10-08-2011, 03:05 PM
Not drinking a lot of coffee myself, I don't actually keep a grinder. I'm sure the burr-style would be superior but it will probably add an extra ten or twenty bucks to the price, at least.

Ethan
10-08-2011, 10:18 PM
Hey guys, I moved to Seattle and instantly became a coffee elitist. So far I've procured:

•An Aeropress. It's awesome. But here's the key: the directions in the box are complete bullshit. For good methods, refer to this (http://worldaeropresschampionship.wordpress.com/recipes/) variety of procedures used at the 2010 World Aeropress Championship. And here's (http://coava.myshopify.com/blogs/news/2429072-inverted-aeropress-disk-method) an alternate method that's meant for use with the Coava DISK (a stainless steel filter meant to replace the stock paper filters), but probably works with paper as well.

•Hario Mini Mill Slim. It's an extremely simple hand-cranked coffee grinder with a high-quality ceramic grinding burr. Its bottom vessel is only big enough to hold one or maybe two cups' worth of grounds, and it takes quite a bit of elbow grease, but you get a grind consistency that competes with $200 electric machines (or so they say).

•Coava DISK. Still on its way to me.

•Honduras San Vincente beans from Stumptown. Real good coffee.

•Kenyan Gichathaini beans from Intelligentsia. Expensive as fuck, and the flavor doesn't really excite me. Probably would not buy again.

•Kenyan Maywal beans from Intelligentsia. Incredible coffee. Tart and bright in a way that I did not know coffee could be.

•My favorite coffee mug, reclaimed from my brother when I visited him in Chicago last weekend. It's got the logo of L.A.'s Coffee Cafe, a small coffee shop in rural Michigan that I stopped in many years ago when visiting a friend's farm.

•My Capresso Infinity grinder with stainless steel burr, also reclaimed from my brother. I bought this a few years ago, back when I got hit with my initial bout of coffee elitism and started using a French press. It's not of much use to me these days because it's too noisy to use when other people are asleep, I never really need to grind for more than one cup, the steel burr probably doesn't grind as well as the ceramic in the Hario, and electricity is for pussies. I think I'll sell it.

•An electric meat thermometer, so I can nail my temperature target.

Coffee. Exciting!

Krakenbrau
10-09-2011, 11:14 AM
I've heard conflicting reports on that. While everything I've read says the best grinds are the freshest, but I've read a few places that it's better to get store ground than grind your self with a cheap grinder, since a cheap grinder just smacks shit with a blade, as opposed to using a burr. Any comment on that?

The issue with blade grinders is that they don't produce consistently sized grounds. You'll get bigger chunks and also dust, and while the desired coarseness varies with preference and brewing method (really coarse for french press, fine for drip, extra fine for espresso), you always want your grounds to be all as close to the same size as possible. Burr grinders are much better at this, but they do cost a bit (sometimes a lot) more.

I drink Kicking Horse (http://www.kickinghorsecoffee.com/en) and grind my own with a burr grinder, and brew in a french press. I usually like it black or with a little bit of cream. I love me some Irish coffee on occasion as well.

That all being said, I'm not sure I've got the process down really. I'm usually not as satisfied as I wanna be. Squid Brand, any tips on brewing perfect french press coffee?

Ethan
10-09-2011, 01:50 PM
The issue with blade grinders is that they don't produce consistently sized grounds. You'll get bigger chunks and also dust, and while the desired coarseness varies with preference and brewing method (really coarse for french press, fine for drip, extra fine for espresso), you always want your grounds to be all as close to the same size as possible. Burr grinders are much better at this, but they do cost a bit (sometimes a lot) more.

I drink Kicking Horse (http://www.kickinghorsecoffee.com/en) and grind my own with a burr grinder, and brew in a french press. I usually like it black or with a little bit of cream. I love me some Irish coffee on occasion as well.

That all being said, I'm not sure I've got the process down really. I'm usually not as satisfied as I wanna be. Squid Brand, any tips on brewing perfect french press coffee?

Coarse as hell grind, filtered water, 4-minute steep. If you're doing all that and still not blown away, I'd switch to a direct trade roaster. This is different from "fair trade". It means a roaster that works directly with coffee estates, and is accordingly able to mark their coffee with information about where it came from, when it was harvested, and when it was roasted. You're almost definitely getting a way, way, way fresher product from those companies than you are from the bigger guys, because they handle the beans more like a produce item (which is what they are) than a branded product. There are plenty of these roasters in Canada, such as 49th Parallel (http://www.49thparallelroasters.com/). There's a cafe by my work that uses their coffee, so I've tasted a couple, and their current Guatemalan coffee ("Guatemala La Bolsa") is reeeeeal good.

Krakenbrau
10-10-2011, 07:48 AM
Coarse as hell grind, filtered water, 4-minute steep. If you're doing all that and still not blown away, I'd switch to a direct trade roaster. This is different from "fair trade". It means a roaster that works directly with coffee estates, and is accordingly able to mark their coffee with information about where it came from, when it was harvested, and when it was roasted. You're almost definitely getting a way, way, way fresher product from those companies than you are from the bigger guys, because they handle the beans more like a produce item (which is what they are) than a branded product. There are plenty of these roasters in Canada, such as 49th Parallel (http://www.49thparallelroasters.com/). There's a cafe by my work that uses their coffee, so I've tasted a couple, and their current Guatemalan coffee ("Guatemala La Bolsa") is reeeeeal good.

I've been doing a 4-minute steep, but I think I might try a little bit of a quicker steep, just as an experiment. My coffee usually winds up tasting somewhat burnt. Maybe I'm not letting the water cool enough.

EDIT: I just brewed up a pot, using a 3 minute steep and letting the water cool a bit longer, and am now drinking a much better cup of coffee. It's just a tiny bit watery, but oh well. I think this is about as good as I'm gonna get with the equipment I have. My burr grinder isn't the best; it does produce some dust, but it flings the grounds at high speed from the mill, so I can usually scoop up mostly bigger chunks by grabbing them closer to the point of ejection.

Ethan
10-10-2011, 08:43 AM
Four minutes in really hot water is pretty much the de facto "correct" way to brew in a press pot, so it probably tastes burnt because that's just how the roast tastes. Letting the grounds steep for too long or in water that's too hot will overextract them and make a coffee that's bitter in the exact same way that oversteeped tea is bitter, but it won't add any of that charred/carbonized flavor that I think you're talking about. Water can't get hot enough to "burn" the grounds in that way. So my first thought would be to find a coffee with a significantly lighter roast and see how that changes things.

The one thing that's nice about those hoity-toity specialty roasters is that they don't bother classifying their coffee based on "dark roast" or "medium roast" or "French roast" or anything like that. They figure out the kind of roast that makes the coffee taste best, and that's the only roast they do. Usually it ends up being a pretty light one. But they don't put you through the indignity of buying a product that says "Light" on it.

Krakenbrau
10-10-2011, 10:06 AM
I've been reading some stuff online, and the general consensus seems to be that 4 minutes is usually best, except for a press pot that only contains enough for 2 or 3 cups (like mine), in which case 2-3 minutes is advised.

You could be right, that it's the bitterness of the roast that I'm tasting, but I'm not so sure. My dad is quite the coffee aficionado, and drinking the same roasts or very similar ones brewed by him never taste as outrageously bitter as when I do it, which is what makes me think overextraction or something.

Ethan
10-14-2011, 09:48 PM
Guys.

I made a cup of coffee and it was so good.

Someone else here needs to buy an aeropress and get all dorky about single origin coffee. We can trade tips!

Ryonin
10-14-2011, 10:51 PM
I would, but I already have a french press and a vacuum brewer.
Got it from Sweet Maria's. Specifically this: http://www.sweetmarias.com/sweetmarias/coffee-brewers/vacuum-brewers/yama-vacuum-brewer.html

And yes, I am using a glass filter rod.

I want to buy some of their single origin coffee some time, but I need some roasting equipment before that. This is something for another time, maybe; I have too many special projects as it is.

Lately I've been considering trying cafe orzo. But... I dunno if that's getting too off-topic.

Ethan
10-14-2011, 10:59 PM
Oh, I wasn't talking about doing my own roasting. That's not worth it for me — my apartment is too small, and my city is too packed with specialty roasters.

Ryonin
10-14-2011, 11:32 PM
Kinda drifted off topic there, but I do want to roast my own, and it was related to the vendor I just linked.

But~ Room shouldn't be too much of an issue, if you ever had reason to try. they have links and information on alternatives to the big pricey machines. Even as simple as the combination of a heat gun and a metal dog dish. Though the chaff would blow everywhere.

Don't really have much in the way of specialty roasters around here. Mostly I've just been ordering coffees from Coffee Fool. so far I like their sumatra mandheling most of the ones I've tried. I think I'm currently on their yirgacheffe.

I want to try this place: http://www.black-sheep-coffee.com/
But... damn, looks like they don't have their sumatra mandheling available right now. I can wait. I am a patient man.

Ethan
10-15-2011, 12:29 AM
I think Stumptown's Indonesia Gajah Aceh (http://www.stumptowncoffee.com/coffees/indonesia-gajah-aceh-organic) will be my next coffee. I wonder if that would be similar to the Sumatran coffee you seek.

Daikaiju
10-15-2011, 08:50 AM
I would, but I already have a french press and a vacuum brewer.
Got it from Sweet Maria's. Specifically this: http://www.sweetmarias.com/sweetmarias/coffee-brewers/vacuum-brewers/yama-vacuum-brewer.html

And yes, I am using a glass filter rod.

Oh hey! That's the pot Lupin III is always using. Neat!

Ethan
10-19-2011, 10:50 PM
I got some of that Indonesian coffee. I made the first couple brews when the beans were only three days old, and it went strangely. A thick, evil-looking froth puffed up as soon as I poured in the water, and the coffee came out very dense-tasting and pungent. It was too intense to be enjoyable.

I made another cup at the five-day mark, and it was much, much tastier.

Apparently the beans hold on to a lot of gases in the first few days after roasting, and that makes them volatile in a way that doesn't really lend itself to great coffee. I'd just assumed that fresher = better, so this was an interesting lesson.

Ryonin
10-23-2011, 08:51 PM
Indeed. That's why you don't find any coffee that's actually fresh in vacu-packed bags. Any place I've ordered the will actually have a bag with a valve to let out the CO2 that accumulates.

Though 3 days sounds like a long time for a coffee to be that gassy. Could just be that variety.

Ethan
10-26-2011, 09:34 PM
Colombia Los Gigantes from Ritual Roasters out of SF. Off the chain.

Also, this was my first time correctly pinpointing one of the roaster's own flavor notes. The first thing I compared it to upon tasting it was graham crackers, and their reference points are dark chocolate, Shirley Temple, and graham cracker.

Kayin
10-27-2011, 05:37 PM
Hey Squid, could you tell me about your experiences with your Aeropress in comparison to a french press? Or how your stainless steel disk went? They seem cheap so I'm tempted to grab one.

Ethan
10-27-2011, 06:37 PM
The Aeropress exerts more pressure than a French press, and that aids the extraction, so you need less time (1 1/2 or 2 minutes rather than 4) and can accordingly get away with a finer grind (drip-like). The paper filters that come with the Aeropress keep all the fines and almost all the oil out of the cup, so the taste ends up being a lot cleaner than French press, with the brighter notes more emphasized. The Coava filter has actual holes and makes it more like French press coffee, so you get the traces of oil and particulate matter on top , and a thin layer of mud on the bottom. It has a thicker mouthfeel and a more balanced flavor than the paper brews.

The trick with the Aeropress, whether you use the Coava filter or not, is to follow a set of directions written by a coffee dork, not the directions that come with the device. The official instructions were written by the Aerobie Flying Ring dude, whose expertise is toys, not coffee, and who most likely developed his method using Folger's or Maxwell House or some other shit for his test brews.

I've mostly been using a recipe from Bitter Press (http://bitterpress.com/2011/01/03/essays-unintentional-success-featuring-the-aeropress-with-guest-spot-by-coavas-disk-filter/), which was linked from Coava's website.

Kayin
10-28-2011, 02:15 PM
holy shit I just found out that I can froth milk with my french press. Going to drink bullshit faux-lattes all day. Good to know that if I get an aeropress, this thing won't be wasted.

Krakenbrau
11-09-2011, 06:13 PM
Holy shit you're right. I've been drinking bullshit faux-cappuccinos all day!

Kayin
11-11-2011, 01:07 PM
As I read this I also realize I'm drinking one RIGHT NOW!

*HIGH FIVE*

As I understand it this is technically a "Café au lait", which often uses double strength coffee. Which I do frequently make.

Anyways spice grinder and an aeropress are definitely things I'm going to get next. But I know someone wants to get me one (or both) for Christmas and I'm like the hardest person to shop for, so I'm not sure if I want to make their lives hell by buying both sooner. Such a silly dilemma!

Rosencrantz
11-11-2011, 07:17 PM
I just got into coffee a few weeks ago. I drank it for a couple of months about ten years ago, when I was in my Air Force technical training and had really dull night classes, but I hated the taste (I've always liked the smell, though). Now that Zachary's been waking up earlier and earlier, coffee is almost necessary to help me out, because I am not a morning person at all. The thing is, I still hate the taste, and I use an absurd amount of creamer. I'm trying to gradually use less so I can get used to the taste and not run out of creamer halfway through the week.

Of course, instead of being groggy all day long until the late evening (when I finally wake up, just before I need to go to sleep), now I'm a bit more awake in the mornings and crash miserably by mid-afternoon. Ah, well!

Ethan
11-11-2011, 09:18 PM
Most people's main complaint about the taste of coffee is the bitterness. But coffee made well has almost no bitterness. There's a slight astringency, like that of very dark chocolate, but that's balanced out by the rest of the favor, as in beer or green tea.

Most coffee, however, is not well-made.

Krakenbrau
11-15-2011, 03:12 PM
Most people's main complaint about the taste of coffee is the bitterness. But coffee made well has almost no bitterness. There's a slight astringency, like that of very dark chocolate, but that's balanced out by the rest of the favor, as in beer or green tea.

Most coffee, however, is not well-made.

Hmmm. I must still be doing something wrong, then. My coffee is usually pretty bitter.

This saddens me.

Ethan
11-15-2011, 03:25 PM
Is it a carbony bitterness, like charred food? Or is it a tannic bitterness, like oversteeped tea?

Krakenbrau
11-15-2011, 04:31 PM
Tannic, I'd say.

Ethan
11-15-2011, 10:43 PM
Maybe try reducing the water temperature. Let it cool down from boiling for another couple minutes.

Krakenbrau
11-16-2011, 04:48 AM
Hm, ok, I'll try that. Usually I put the water on to boil, fill up my grinder, and get everything else ready. Then once the water boils, I grind my beans and measure the water, and then begin steeping. But maybe that's not enough cooling time. What would you say is optimal water temperature? I've started measuring everything else, may as well get the temp right too.

Ethan
11-16-2011, 08:55 PM
They say coffee flavors extract best at around 195-200°F.

There was a scene in Breaking Bad where [very minor non-plot spoiler] one of the characters is making coffee and mentions that he's trying to make sure the temperature never rises above 92°C to minimize tannin extraction. 92°C is 197.6°F.

Hey, here's a nice coffee resource I found: pourover coffee kettles (http://stores.ebay.com/homeloo/_i.html?_nkw=kettle) for way cheaper than the Hario Buono V60 kettle that all coffee dorks love. I just ordered myself one of the regal-looking ones.

Krakenbrau
11-17-2011, 08:08 AM
Oh yeah, I remember that scene.

Alright, I'll give that a shot. For reference, I've been using 40g of coarsely ground beans with 750ml of water, 4 minute steep (+/- 10 seconds).

Parish
11-17-2011, 09:02 AM
The best coffee is the kind my friend brought back from Vietnam. I'm drinking our last batch of it (I've had the last few beans in the freezer for a while for a special occasion; that occasion turned out to be "leaving for work late because I have a Nintendo appointment before going to the office and we're out of regular beans") and it's so, so good. Doesn't need sugar or milk; it's beautifully mellow straight.

It's the kind of coffee that is swallowed whole by weasels (not that (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/member.php?u=765) Weasel) which cannot digest it, so they simply pass it through undigested but chemically altered by the process of being inside a living creature's acidic guts. Sounds gross, sure, but (they wash it first and) it tastes so good. Wish it were easier to come by. It's stupidly cheap if you buy it in Vietnam, but imported it's insanely pricey.

Ethan
11-17-2011, 10:52 AM
The best coffee is the kind my friend brought back from Vietnam. I'm drinking our last batch of it (I've had the last few beans in the freezer for a while for a special occasion; that occasion turned out to be "leaving for work late because I have a Nintendo appointment before going to the office and we're out of regular beans") and it's so, so good. Doesn't need sugar or milk; it's beautifully mellow straight.

It's the kind of coffee that is swallowed whole by weasels (not that (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/member.php?u=765) Weasel) which cannot digest it, so they simply pass it through undigested but chemically altered by the process of being inside a living creature's acidic guts. Sounds gross, sure, but (they wash it first and) it tastes so good. Wish it were easier to come by. It's stupidly cheap if you buy it in Vietnam, but imported it's insanely pricey.

My friend bought some of that same coffee (I think) from Cafe Mai when he visited me in Hanoi. We weren't sure at the time whether it was legit. The price difference between this stuff and the civet coffee sold on internet boutiques was astronomical, and after all, Vietnam does have a penchant for producing knockoff products. Also, it was a little bit suspicious to see that every single downtown and Old Quarter coffee shop in the city apparently had pounds and pounds and pounds of this stuff on hand. If the process to obtain this coffee is really so esoteric and time-intensive, how does every single place have an endless supply?

So we researched it, and found this (http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/food/2011/07/weasel-coffee-youre-going-to-drink-what/) Smithsonian Magazine article:

It turns out that certified civet-fermented coffee, which is also produced in Indonesia and the Philippines, can sell for up to $600 per pound. At a London department store recently, a single cup cost £50, or $80.

So how does Café Mai keep the price down? They’ve cut civets out of the production process. Using artificial fermenting methods, Café Mai, along with other Vietnamese roasters like Trung Nguyen, have brought the flavor of ca phe cut chon to the masses.

My friend was a bit disappointed.

Then he flew back to the States and made some of this bogus civet coffee in his French press, and said it was the best cup of coffee he's ever made in his life.

I'd like to try some. And I'm also pretty curious about trying actually-shat-out civet coffee, but the cheapest US source I know of charges about 16 bucks an ounce, so... one of these days. (The Cafe Mai stuff was about $3 per ounce.)

All this stuff notwithstanding, I am a devotee of Vietnamese coffee and "third wave" American coffee, and they are very, very different beasts. West coast hipster beans (http://www.gamespite.net/talkingtime/showpost.php?p=1187639&postcount=5155) produce a coffee that's bright, fruity, and almost tea-like. Vietnamese beans produce a coffee that's blacker than midnight on a moonless night.

Other good coffee traditions: Italian; Cuban; Turkish.

Parish
11-17-2011, 03:31 PM
Yep, this stuff is Trung Nguyen brand, so... hmmm. Do you have any info on the fake fermenting process? I am willing to convert my bathtub into a civet coffee forgery device if need be.

AJR
11-17-2011, 09:25 PM
Mikkeller makes an imperial stout that uses civet beans. I've been tempted to try it, but the process does kind of weird me out a bit. It's probably something I just need to get over.

Adam
11-17-2011, 09:46 PM
I thrive on bee vomit, so civet shat probably isn't too much beyond the pale.

AJR
11-17-2011, 09:56 PM
Yeah, honey was the first thing that popped into my head.

Ethan
11-18-2011, 12:39 AM
Yep, this stuff is Trung Nguyen brand, so... hmmm. Do you have any info on the fake fermenting process? I am willing to convert my bathtub into a civet coffee forgery device if need be.

I know nothing about it. But assuming what you've got is "Legendee" coffee in the gold vacuum bag, I know you can find that stuff in the States. The price is higher than in VN, but only by a factor of 2 or so. The web store of Trung Nguyen's US importer/broker has it (http://www.trung-nguyen-online.com/about-legendee-coffee.php) for $20 a bag, and I recall buying one in a Vietnamese grocery store in Chicago for about $16. (It was about $8.50 a bag in Hanoi if memory serves.)

That web store also sells a few varieties of (supposedly) real civet coffee from Indonesia and the Philippines. One of these days I'd like to spring for one of the 3.5 ounce bags, which costs the same as a full-priced video game.

I've only ever tried Legendee brewed up in a Vietnamese ca phe phin, with excellent results. I wonder how it would taste if I brewed it with the same methods I've been using with my Stumptown beans.

Krakenbrau
11-18-2011, 02:48 AM
I was at a local coffee shop earlier today where they have something called Vietnamese Coffee, which is espresso with sweetened condensed milk and something else...ice maybe? I suspect this is a western approximation. Can anyone confirm or deny this?

Shagohod
11-19-2011, 11:59 AM
It sounds kind of like the coffee analogue to Thai Tea (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thai_tea)

Adam
11-20-2011, 02:21 AM
I was at a local coffee shop earlier today where they have something called Vietnamese Coffee, which is espresso with sweetened condensed milk and something else...ice maybe? I suspect this is a western approximation. Can anyone confirm or deny this?

Around these parts, if it's not being served by a girl in a bikini, it's not Vietnamese Coffee.

Krakenbrau
11-20-2011, 12:39 PM
Well, around these parts, it's -20 C, so no bikinis.

Paul le Fou
11-24-2011, 03:28 AM
My friend made some Cuban Coffee for us in this little steampunk whatsyhoosit after our Thanksgiving dinner. It was sweet and smooth and rich and delicious.

I was at a local coffee shop earlier today where they have something called Vietnamese Coffee, which is espresso with sweetened condensed milk and something else...ice maybe? I suspect this is a western approximation. Can anyone confirm or deny this?

No actually, that's about right. In Vietnam you can get coffee like that all over the place. It's a really thick, rich coffee to start with, then it's sweetened with condensed milk, making it even thicker and richer and super-sweet. It's like a coffee milkshake. It's ridiculously great. Served on ice or hot, but usually on ice(?).

Red Hedgehog
11-25-2011, 03:37 PM
Why has no one in here mentioned the blue bottle/San Francisco style pour over drip coffee. It is sooooo good. Really happy it has spread to other cities.

Krakenbrau
11-29-2011, 06:41 AM
No actually, that's about right. In Vietnam you can get coffee like that all over the place. It's a really thick, rich coffee to start with, then it's sweetened with condensed milk, making it even thicker and richer and super-sweet. It's like a coffee milkshake. It's ridiculously great. Served on ice or hot, but usually on ice(?).

I will try it!

Matchstick
11-29-2011, 08:37 AM
You can get that kind of coffee at pretty much any Pho place around here.

Ethan
11-29-2011, 09:32 AM
Latest coffee: Guatemala Retana from 49th Parallel Roasters in Vancouver. Powerfully delicious.

Ethan
12-20-2011, 01:27 PM
I turned my entire office on to the nice coffee beans/AeroPress/steel filter thing. We used our tip jar money to buy all the requisite gear, and now I can brew up tasty single-cup coffee while I'm getting paid.

Kayin
12-28-2011, 10:21 PM
Got an Aeropress for Christmas. After a few tries I've managed to brew a tasty cup that is still inferior to my french press. I already have a coava disk on the way, and after that I'll give the inverted method a try.

Ethan
12-29-2011, 09:00 AM
The Disk will help, but you can make good coffee with an AeroPress without additional toys. Use a medium drip grind, steep for a minute or a minute and a half before pressing, and fill the entire chamber with water so that you're brewing a full cup and not diluting anything with water later.

That said, here's what I've found while hanging out in Chicago for the holidays: the freshness of the coffee beans matters more than any other part of the equation by far. My brother got a bag of MUD coffee as a Secret Santa gift. Their coffee is apparently well-liked, but this bag was pre-ground and therefore stale. I used the exact same method that I use with my Seattle stuff, and it came out tasting like nothing.

upupdowndown
12-30-2011, 06:56 AM
That said, here's what I've found while hanging out in Chicago for the holidays: the freshness of the coffee beans matters more than any other part of the equation by far. My brother got a bag of MUD coffee as a Secret Santa gift. Their coffee is apparently well-liked, but this bag was pre-ground and therefore stale. I used the exact same method that I use with my Seattle stuff, and it came out tasting like nothing.

Best advice I can give for coffee is buy the beans whole, preferably from a local roaster who knows what they're doing, and keep them in the freezer until it's time for you to grind them. We do this and get great coffee from a standard decent drip machine.

Kayin
01-08-2012, 06:55 PM
Disk is fun, but I'm back to square one again for getting the taste right. But oh boy I did miss those particles. I also burnt off a playing cards worth of skin (http://kayin.pyoko.org/burnphoto.JPG) due to someone knocking over my aeropress onto my wrist (note to self: Never let anyone near me when I'm brewing coffee), so I'm sorta scared to mess around with the inverted method, but who knows. I could do it in the sink and be perfectly safe (by flip time, it should be 'ow' hot and not 'skin melting' hot).

THAT SAID, OH, DID I MISS YOU, GRIT. Anyways using the disk, how many clicks on my hoari slim mill should I be using to get a proper medium grind? I think I'm a little too rough right now but I'm not sure.

Dizzy
01-08-2012, 07:10 PM
how can i make coffee on the fly?

Daikaiju
01-13-2012, 09:06 AM
With a very tiny french press.
ZING!

No, seriously, how quick are we talking here?

taosterman
02-21-2012, 11:51 AM
We had a Sur La Table gift card to spend from the wedding, so I picked up an awesome burr grinder. Hooooooly shit my coffee has a consistent flavor and no uneven chunks of grind floating on top! I've never been much of a coffee snob but this might be my gateway drug.

Luana
02-26-2012, 11:47 PM
I am the biggest coffee snob you may meet. It comes from growing up in the heart of the coffee snob revolution.

Anyway, fuck all of your fancy shit*. Grab the best beans you can find (luckily I live right by two excellent roasters**, which I will put against the Stumptowns of the world any day) and cold brew those motherfuckers. All you need is a pitcher, a sieve or strainer (although you can get away with using just a funnel if you are as broke as I am), and cheesecloth/unbleached coffee filters.

What you will end up with is liquid gold. It's smoother than a traditionally brewed cup, and for those with delicate tummies, less acidic. Cut the concentrate with milk, water, whatever's your poison and rejoice.

* - this is coming from a person who has done drip coffee, keurigs, aeropress, etcetera. If you have the time, brewing up some toddy beats it all for the home snob. I am fond of the Chemex, though, enough to gift Stiv one for Christmas 2010.

* - come to Olympia, go to the Batdorf and Bronson Tasting Room and Olympia Coffee Roasters. I guess we have a Caffe Vita here and a couple of places with Stumptown beans but what's the point

Kirin
02-27-2012, 10:23 AM
Coldbrew is awesome. My wife used to do it all the time before her nuerologist made her give up 90% of her caffeine (a tragic day let me tell you).

Speaking of snobby coffee establishments, though, I was taken to this one place when I was visiting SF, which I've sadly forgotten the name of, where they brew each *cup* of coffee individually. It was all pretty ridiculously self-important, but I have to admit it was also a damn fine cup of coffee.

Ethan
04-19-2012, 07:17 PM
So, I have a coffee podcast now. The name of the podcast is Loud Cups. It's all about drinking and brewing specialty coffee (or third wave coffee, or direct trade/single origin coffee, or gourmet light roast coffee, or whatever you want to call it). You should listen to it.

It has a website. (http://loudcups.com/)

And it's on the iTunes Store. (http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/loud-cups/id520381898)

Serephine
07-21-2013, 08:45 PM
I bought some nice coffee beans and am drinking the results! Its fucking awesome! Its very dark and rich but not bitter at all. Do we have a coffee thread?

how did you prepare them?

Possibly a question to answer in this thread (http://www.talking-time.net/showthread.php?t=9610).
Bringing it back motherfuckers.

Because I am a heathen without access to a french press or anything fancier than a bean grinder I just ground them up in said grinder and threw it into the Mr. Coffee machine we have around the house. It was definitely a much nicer cup than just the plain Folger's I've been drinking since I got off on this coffee kick. This (http://www.amazon.com/grocery-gourmet-food/dp/B0024KGQJI) is the type of coffee I got, I bought it at Target on a whim since I was there to buy some stuff for my new residence anyways.

FWIW watching Twin Peaks might have had something to do with this whole thing; that combined with basically needing to explore an entirely new avenue of interests what with the recent craziness in my life.

McDohl
07-22-2013, 10:16 PM
Bringing it back motherfuckers.

Because I am a heathen without access to a french press or anything fancier than a bean grinder I just ground them up in said grinder and threw it into the Mr. Coffee machine we have around the house. It was definitely a much nicer cup than just the plain Folger's I've been drinking since I got off on this coffee kick. This (http://www.amazon.com/grocery-gourmet-food/dp/B0024KGQJI) is the type of coffee I got, I bought it at Target on a whim since I was there to buy some stuff for my new residence anyways.

FWIW watching Twin Peaks might have had something to do with this whole thing; that combined with basically needing to explore an entirely new avenue of interests what with the recent craziness in my life.

Peet's is good brew. We switch between Peet's and Starbucks at work.

There's a place near me that brews an absolutely killer Vanilla Nut blend, but it's $2 a cup, and that's really quite the non-starter considering I can very easily grind/press my own coffee. I am trying to replicate it and am having less-than-stellar results; namely it's nowhere near as strong as said blend.

Ample Vigour
09-25-2013, 09:53 AM
Y'all ready for this ($2000 grinder)

http://micoffee.co.kr/files/attach/images/51/110/7a9e6f8572314dc7cf012d9c4bcb8948.jpg

The ek43 is apparently the hottest grinder of the year, which isn't too bad for a repurposed industrial spice grinder. It featured heavily in Matt "As" Perger's World Barista Cup entry (http://www.home-barista.com/tips/matt-pergers-mind-blowing-wbc-performance-t25995.html), and looks gorgeous.

The decadence of our global society is wonderful.

Paul le Fou
09-25-2013, 05:26 PM
I've been trying out cold-brew coffee lately. Benefits: it makes a lot at once and keeps in the fridge, so it's easier to just grab and drink when I want it. Also, spice infusion is easier because of the long soak - last time I threw in a cinnamon stick and some cardamom pods. And because it's less bitter I can drink it without sugar!

Ample Vigour
09-26-2013, 07:22 AM
I've been trying out cold-brew coffee lately. Benefits: it makes a lot at once and keeps in the fridge, so it's easier to just grab and drink when I want it. Also, spice infusion is easier because of the long soak - last time I threw in a cinnamon stick and some cardamom pods. And because it's less bitter I can drink it without sugar!

Cold brew is the shit. It had never occurred to me to put spices in the mix, though!

Do you add milk or water to cut it?

McDohl
09-26-2013, 07:36 PM
Coworker recommended looking into coldbrew. Any recommendations on system?

Ample Vigour
09-26-2013, 10:12 PM
Coworker recommended looking into coldbrew. Any recommendations on system?

Toddy is the gold standard. Or a jug and some cheesecloth. But that gets kinda messy

Paul le Fou
09-27-2013, 12:21 AM
I'm totally gonna make some pumpkin pie brew. Cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, here we fuckin come

I cut mine with (soy) milk. Water only if I'm putting it on ice (with some simple syrup?) for "iced coffee". But in the morning, just throw it in with (soy) milk. Or in a protein shake!

System? Uh... A pitcher of water. And... Coffee grounds. That's all I use. Some saran wrap over the top, and coffee filters (in a seive or something) to separate the crunchy bits from the drinky bits.

It really is that simple. Though a French press would probably work just as well. Or better!

McDohl
09-27-2013, 09:37 AM
I use a French press. I figured maybe we the grind/filter was different or something. But I can try just using tap water next time and just cooling it.

Paul le Fou
09-27-2013, 10:52 PM
You don't actually have to cool it. It's not "cold," actually, it's just room temperature. Put grinds and tap water in your french press. 12-24 hours later, filter out the grinds.

The coffee will keep in the fridge for 5 days to two weeks. Cut it with water or milk when you drink it, it's kind of a "concentrate" in its straight form.

I've heard that finer grind is better. I don't know what the difference would be, to be honest, I'm no pro. I just buy coffee grounds and pour them in a thing with water, since I don't have a grinder.



I want to emphasize this: this is bush-league shit. There's no need for fancy-pantsy nonsense here. I don't know shit about coffee. I saw a chemex once and I recoiled in fear. Get some nice beans ground into small bits, put them in water for a long time, then take the coffee-water away from the ground beans. Bing bang boom.

Ample Vigour
09-28-2013, 10:56 AM
Don't use a chemex unless you like making coffee much more than you like drinking coffee.

Reinforcements
09-28-2013, 07:28 PM
You don't actually have to cool it. It's not "cold," actually, it's just room temperature. Put grinds and tap water in your french press. 12-24 hours later, filter out the grinds.
And if you're like me and cleaning a french press is still too much work, you can cold brew in any old container, then just pour it through a coffee filter. Super easy.

McDohl
09-29-2013, 04:02 PM
Okay. I have a pot of cold brew going. We'll see how it goes tomorrow when I normally have my post-lunch coffee.

Paul le Fou
09-29-2013, 06:08 PM
And if you're like me and cleaning a french press is still too much work, you can cold brew in any old container, then just pour it through a coffee filter. Super easy.

That's what I do! I ain't have no French press. I want coffee, not coward frog juice.

McDohl
09-30-2013, 02:40 PM
So my initial reaction is that I'm unimpressed with what I've made. I probably didn't use enough grounds, since despite going with a finer grind and there indeed being almost nonexistant bitterness, I have an extremely watery result.

Not sure where to take this next. Hrm.

Paul le Fou
09-30-2013, 10:43 PM
Try again with more grounds/a better ratio. I've checked a number of recipes and none seem to be in exact agreement, but the amount of grounds I've used before has seemed like a lot, so maybe it takes a high amount.

TK Flash
10-01-2013, 01:21 AM
So I buy Boss Silky Black because those are on sale lately at the AM/PM in my work building :(

Wolfgang
10-01-2013, 12:13 PM
what i do is i get those packages of starbucks iced coffee, that you open the pouch and dump it in some water and/or milk and then stir it, except i put it in a ninja turtles sports drink bottle and shake it up

fuck yoooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuu in the coffehole

Wolfgang
10-01-2013, 12:14 PM
fuck you ample

fuck you especially kayin

i hope my last post makes you so mad

ahahahahahahahahahahahahaha i love instant coffee fuck youuouoououou hooowwwwwwooooooooooooooooooooolllllll ow ow owwwoooooooooo

Wolfgang
10-01-2013, 12:16 PM
i'm just kidding*, but i think it's cute how some people take coffee so deathly serious

*about the fuck you part, i really do love starbucks instant iced coffee pouches

jpfriction
10-01-2013, 01:04 PM
i'm just kidding*, but i think it's cute how some people take coffee so deathly serious

*about the fuck you part, i really do love starbucks instant iced coffee pouches

No judgement here. I'll mix up one of those when I want to feel jittery for the next 7 hours. I swear the caffeine content in those things has to be just under lethal.

Wolfgang
10-01-2013, 01:12 PM
No judgement here. I'll mix up one of those when I want to feel jittery for the next 7 hours. I swear the caffeine content in those things has to be just under lethal.

Holy shit, right? I can drink several sodas and not feel a thing but if I mix up one of those pouches it's like I'm on ADD meds

Ample Vigour
10-01-2013, 09:42 PM
No judgement here. I'll mix up one of those when I want to feel jittery for the next 7 hours. I swear the caffeine content in those things has to be just under lethal.

Just slightly less caffeinated than Buckfast

Ample Vigour
10-01-2013, 09:43 PM
So I buy Boss Silky Black because those are on sale lately at the AM/PM in my work building :(

That Boss Silky Black is not the name of a coffee-themed gay bondage movie is proof enough that this is a fallen world

Paul le Fou
10-01-2013, 09:57 PM
If you're still not convinced re: the futility of life in this cruel and ugly world of ours, one taste of Boss Silky Black* will convince you.




*I once met a pimp with that name

TK Flash
10-02-2013, 11:02 PM
Welcome to the Japanese Canned Coffee Blind Taste Test Challenge, "Canned black or urine 'n bleach?"

Daikaiju
10-14-2013, 11:09 AM
Erstwhile Pathos bought the Folger's Black Silk* and brought it into work. I have been actively discouraging him not to.

*more like black soot amirite?

Paul le Fou
11-14-2013, 11:34 PM
I've been getting some Hawaiian flavored coffee. I just finished a bag of vanilla-macadamia which was amazing. Currently working on some Hula Pie, which has coconut, macadamia, and hazelnut. Yummmmm

But now that I'm throwing a filter in one of those over-cup things and pouring hot water through it, I've realized I have no idea how much coffee I'm supposed to be using. I used to use a tablespoon but then I started just shaking it directly in. Also how much water. I wonder if I've been making it weak.

How many afficionadoes have I driven totally insane by saying that? Hmmmm D:

Ample Vigour
11-15-2013, 09:14 PM
You can get past htat pretty easily with a scale, but it's your coffee

Torgo
11-17-2013, 10:08 AM
But now that I'm throwing a filter in one of those over-cup things and pouring hot water through it, I've realized I have no idea how much coffee I'm supposed to be using. I used to use a tablespoon but then I started just shaking it directly in. Also how much water. I wonder if I've been making it weak.
I have a little single-cup brewer that was originally made for those dumb Senseo pods that no one has ever purchased but apparently still exist. I'm much too frugal an individual for that nonsense, so I just buy basket filters and cut them down to fit the little thing where the pod goes.

I put about 2-ish tablespoons of coffee for about 8-ish ounces of water. I based the amount of coffee off the weight of a coffee pod that came with the machine.

Paul le Fou
11-17-2013, 10:58 PM
I have a little single-cup brewer that was originally made for those dumb Senseo pods that no one has ever purchased but apparently still exist. I'm much too frugal an individual for that nonsense, so I just buy basket filters and cut them down to fit the little thing where the pod goes.

I put about 2-ish tablespoons of coffee for about 8-ish ounces of water. I based the amount of coffee off the weight of a coffee pod that came with the machine.

Yeah, I did some googling and found 2 tablespoons for one (slightly smaller) cup of water, but I just use a little more water.

This was rather more than I had been using before, and will make my coffee go faster. I'll go with it for a bit and compare results before, if necessary, adjusting for my own preferences.

vaterite
12-11-2013, 08:42 AM
It was 11 PM on a cold, sleepy December evening and I was late to pick up the wife from the airport as a result of waiting for my french press to brew!

So that this situation will trouble me no more, I'd like to get a french press mug, like I've seen at various coffee shops. Bodum has a plastic one that gets middling reviews on amazon. The complaints seem to be that it only stays hot for ~2 hours (if I still have coffee after two hours something is wildly wrong), the plastic parts let some grounds through (not a deal breaker), it doesn't hold up over the long term (kind of important).

Does anyone have/know of any french press on the go mugs that they love?

dotpatrick
12-11-2013, 10:26 AM
I got one from REI when I bought a camping backpack from them and it is pretty nice.

Stainless steel so it does a pretty good job of keeping the coffee hot and is pretty durable. It even has a little compartment for storing grounds for later use in case you want a second cup while on the go although you need find more hot water as well.

Holds about 12 fluid ounces.

I believe it retails for $25-30.

Ethan
12-11-2013, 10:27 AM
Anything but drip. I favor the French press when I want black coffee and the Vietnamese steel filter when I want sweet coffee, but I'm also equipped with a Turkish ibrik and a moka pot when the need arises. I grind my own with a Capresso burr grinder. I like the Trader Joe's Scandinavian Blend in the press and Trung Nguyen beans for Vietnamese coffee. My next coffee-related implement will be one of these (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/Coffeemakers.htm).

Sadly, I seem to have lost my ability to handle caffeine within the last year. I get the shakes if I have coffee before the afternoon. Morning coffee really screws up my day. It has become an after-dinner thing for me.

As a Seattle barista whose kitchen now includes an entire three-shelf corner cupboard devoted to coffee and tea implements, I am amused that I wrote this. I get more and more particular and elitist as time goes on, apparently.

I never did buy a Chemex, though a housemate has gone through two or three (all broken). My next toy will be a Kalita dripper, in stainless steel. These days my favorite brewing device is a Clever dripper and my favorite roaster is Kuma Coffee.

vaterite
12-11-2013, 05:30 PM
I got one from REI when I bought a camping backpack from them and it is pretty nice.

Looks great, added to wishlist.

Since that request was successful, here's another shameless plea. Does anyone know of an electric kettle that does a good/quick job boiling water? I've gotten a few from target/walmart etc. that boil water in exactly the same amount of time it takes me in a pot on the stove. Full disclosure: I was incredibly spoiled by the extra voltage on kettles in Scotland, and there may be no hope of replicating that awesome here in the US.

A side note: When you forgot to pickup decent grounds, and must grab something quickly on the way home with your parents in the car, don't go to Dunkin' Donuts. If you make that mistake, buy 1 pound of coffee for $10.00. Don't be seduced by their offer of 3 lbs for 19.99. I am still drinking this shit weeks later.

I was debating giving the grounds to some relative who wouldn't notice for christmas, but I don't think I have the heart. I think instead I'll use it to experiment with cold brew grain sizes / amounts in the french press.

McDohl
01-12-2014, 11:43 AM
This is a local roaster (http://www.keancoffee.com/) near me in SoCal.

They might make the best coffee ever.

Parish
01-12-2014, 04:39 PM
Trying to learn to love Hawaiian peaberry coffee. It's so... mellow. It's like drinking water, kind of.

Reinforcements
01-18-2014, 05:35 PM
I got a turkish coffee pot and neat little hand-grinder for Christmas. I've been making some, to my taste, pretty good coffee with it, and it's really not much more work than grinding with my electric grinder and pouring hot water over it. Not sure if I'm doing the foaming thing right - it foams nicely once but the foam doesn't stick around, not sure if it's supposed to. Plus the pot looks nice sitting on my stove, and it's a conversation piece!

All I want is a proper cup of coffee
Made in a proper copper coffee pot
I may be off my dot
But I want a proper coffee in a proper copper pot
Iron coffee pots and tin coffee pots
They are no use to me
If I can't have a proper cup of coffee in a proper copper coffee pot I'll have a cup of tea

Ethan
01-29-2014, 10:19 PM
Trying to learn to love Hawaiian peaberry coffee. It's so... mellow. It's like drinking water, kind of.

Hawaiian coffee is super delicate and mellow, tends to not have that much more going for it than those qualities, and also costs a damn fortune. There's a reason why specialty roasters rarely ever use it. The only one I've ever come across is a coffee called Rusty's Hawaiian Yellow Caturra Natural, from PT's Coffee out of Kansas. One of my favorite Seattle cafes was making cups of it for $9 a pop if I remember correctly, mostly just as a curiosity for their dorkiest customers. I had some. It was... fine.

I bought a bag of this (http://www.intelligentsiacoffee.com/product/coffee/kurimi-ethiopia) Ethiopian coffee from Intelligentsia when I was visiting Chicago the other week and it is so, so, so good. It really deserves 3 so's.

teekun
01-30-2014, 02:57 PM
Is there a nice way to tell a cafe that everything about the coffee they make is perfect except their beans which are like a hate crime against my taste buds?

:(

Teaspoon
01-30-2014, 03:10 PM
Go in when it's quiet with your own posh beans and tell them that you have found a kind of coffee so wonderful that you want to share the experience with them, and graciously force it on them while mentioning how wonderful it would be if they could stock this sort of bean and make it and you'd be willing to pay for the privilege.

Or, you know, find a different cafe.

teekun
01-30-2014, 03:21 PM
But this one is right in the building! And they make a macchiato with exactly the proportions of milk and espresso I like! And I guess I'll be going down the street for coffee from now on.

Paul le Fou
10-14-2014, 02:53 PM
I just made my first cup in my new place with my new aeropress. I'm impressed! it came out a little cooler though and I made the mistake of using cold milk so it went room temperature almost instantly, but I don't like hot-hot drinks anyway. It was really smooth and mellow. It was also my first time using these beans (Zoka coffee's Tatoosh) and I was also Not Displeased!

Ample Vigour
10-14-2014, 10:13 PM
I want a Moka pot but there is no way MY WIFE will approve a third coffee apparatus

Mine is a tale of woe

Dizzy
04-09-2015, 09:08 AM
Man, I am officially done with anything that isn't black coffee at Starbucks. I was weaned on Chai for a bit until I went to Skinny Vanilla latte, but yeesh so much cream and foam and sugar made them taste like candlewax.

ghosttaster
04-19-2015, 11:07 AM
Oh so you think you're too good for candlewax, eh?

Anyway, the only functional coffee apparatus in my house is a french press. I usually stick to dark roasts. I'm still tinkering with blooming/brewing times. Right now I'm at a 20 second period to let the kettle cool a little once it's off the burner, a 30 second bloom for the grounds, and a 6 minute brewing time.

Lady
08-30-2015, 02:39 PM
So, yesterday, my friends and I walked to the campus starbucks, and I saw that the recommended drink of the day was an "iced carmel macchiato", and I remarked "I wonder if I could get that frozen instead"

one of my friends turns to me and gives me this DEADLY SERIOUS look
"no, you can't do that, that's not what the drink is"

And I am totally confused because I just drink coffees that I know will be nummy and sweet like candy, and kinda ignore everything beyond that complexity of definition

But he proceeded to explain that "macchiato" refers to the process by which it is made, something to do with milk sitting on the bottom and espresso on top, and that if I wanted something frozen, it would have to be mixed(!!). So I asked why you couldn't crush the ice separately and then build the drink on this, and he shook his head and gave up on me.

Help me build my coffee cred. I don't speak espresso. WHAT IS THE MEANING OF ALL OF THIS

man I wish I could remember who that was.

I found a moka pot (http://www.amazon.com/Forever-Espresso-Miss-Moka-Maker/dp/B001BCOH7I/?tag=lege1-20) at Goodwill yesterday (!) for $4 (!!) and tried it out this morning with some drip ground coffee that has been in my freezer probably since the time I wrote the quoted post. And it was really good.

(Except the part where I filled the base too full and sloshed out incredibly hot coffee when I picked it up to pour. No blisters, though!)

(and since it's been so hot, I think I'm going to try a cold brew in my french press at work...)

Paul le Fou
08-30-2015, 02:45 PM
So I'm gonna pimp out my friend's beans:

Some friends of CaliScrub's and mine are involved in a startup bringing Philippine coffee to the states (https://kalsada.com/). They work with family growers in the Philippines on their processes and local development, ship the coffee in, and roast it to order here in Seattle. Y'all should check it out!

Daikaiju
10-24-2015, 02:33 PM
So the dumbasses ("it's called pumpkin spice, but there's no pumpkin!" said every dittohead EVER) got actual pumpkin added to to Pumpkin Spice drinks this year. So far, it's as I expected. HORRIBLY WRONG. Anyone have a different experience?

muteKi
10-24-2015, 10:03 PM
oh my god why

nutmeg and cinnamon are good in coffee or tea (pumpkin spice chai? don't mind if I do!) but pumpkin doesn't belong in anything

ArugulaZ
10-24-2015, 11:33 PM
oh my god why

nutmeg and cinnamon are good in coffee or tea (pumpkin spice chai? don't mind if I do!) but pumpkin doesn't belong in anything

It belongs in me, when it's in pie form.

muteKi
10-25-2015, 12:23 AM
sweet potato pie > pumpkin pie

Paul le Fou
10-25-2015, 05:58 PM
Yeah, the idiots who were like "There's no pumpkin in the pumpkin spice" missed the point that the whole point is the SPICES, fuck the pumpkin. Some beers do this too, and while that's a lot more in line with beer and can work very well, I don't like it there either. I just want spices.

sweet potato pie > pumpkin pie

Stop! Pies shouldn't fight!

ArugulaZ
10-27-2015, 06:58 PM
Did somebody say "pie fight?"

(Three Stooges routine)

MetManMas
10-27-2015, 06:59 PM
Yeah, the idiots who were like "There's no pumpkin in the pumpkin spice" missed the point that the whole point is the SPICES, fuck the pumpkin.

Yeah, seriously. The spice is what matters.

Out of curiosity, where is this so called pumpkin spice stuff with actual pumpkin at? I've just been getting the spice-flavored coffee and liquid creamer from Walmart as usual this season and haven't noticed any difference.

Daikaiju
10-28-2015, 06:03 PM
Dunkin' Donuts and Starbucks.

ArugulaZ
10-30-2015, 01:08 AM
Back on topic, you guys have any thoughts on Cafe la Llave? Seems like decent enough espresso.

Beefy Hits
10-30-2015, 11:15 PM
I love the smell of coffee, but I just can't drink the stuff.

Teaspoon
10-31-2015, 08:54 AM
Quite so.

Daikaiju
10-31-2015, 09:25 AM
I love the smell of coffee, but I just can't drink the stuff.

Oddly I feel the same way about tobacco. I love the smell of dried tobacco, but damn if I'll smoke, chew, or ingest it in any form.

ArugulaZ
11-19-2015, 06:24 PM
Oh, barf! You guys weren't kidding about Shurfine. I just tried their instant coffee yesterday, and it tasted like roasted dirt and shame. Somewhere a flower planted on Juan Valdez's grave is wilting.

Paul le Fou
11-20-2015, 12:01 PM
I got some decaf coffee, but drinking it makes my head feel like caffeine. Maybe just a little? I had some later in the evening and fell asleep fine so maybe it's a placebo effect or something.

taosterman
11-21-2015, 10:16 AM
Decaf does contain small amounts of caffeine - it's tough to isolate every bit of it from the elements that give coffee its flavor.

Lady
12-09-2015, 08:16 PM
so "light roasts" and "dark roasts", I presume the light/dark depends on the time the beans are roasted, but how does that correlate to flavor?

I had been under the impression that a light roast would taste less bitter, but wasn't able to find one I liked. When I visisted my parents', I noted that they used a dark or extra dark roast, so I decided to experiment. The first cup today was delicious, but why?

My former Starbucks manager friend says that the blonde roasts there contain more caffeine than the darker ones. maybe that is in the equation, too

Ixo
12-09-2015, 09:49 PM
http://survivingtheworld.net/stw-200proof.jpg

Reinforcements
12-10-2015, 11:05 AM
so "light roasts" and "dark roasts", I presume the light/dark depends on the time the beans are roasted, but how does that correlate to flavor?

I had been under the impression that a light roast would taste less bitter, but wasn't able to find one I liked. When I visisted my parents', I noted that they used a dark or extra dark roast, so I decided to experiment. The first cup today was delicious, but why?

My former Starbucks manager friend says that the blonde roasts there contain more caffeine than the darker ones. maybe that is in the equation, too

Broadly speaking, the darker the roast the more it will taste like the roast and the less it will taste like the bean. So you get the flavors you'd typically associate with the Maillard reaction - caramel, sweetness, "burnt" flavors, basically. Lighter roasts will be more "grassy" and more astringent. As for bitterness (and general quality) of the final cup, it depends on a lot of things but mostly it comes down to how fresh the beans are and how well they're prepared. Fresher is better - old beans will be weaker and more bitter. Then it's a matter of the grind size, amount of grounds used, and time. Don't use too few beans thinking you like your coffee "weaker" - over-extracting will make the coffee bitter, which is what happens if you've got a lot of water moving through a small amount of grounds. You want around 2 tbsp of grounds per cup of coffee. The longer the brewing method, the coarser the grind, from Turkish coffee on the very fine end, to espresso, Aeropress, pour-over, drip pot, and french press. If you're working with pre-ground coffee and a drip pot, just be sure the grounds are as fresh as possible and you're using enough.

Adam
12-10-2015, 12:14 PM
My former Starbucks manager friend says that the blonde roasts there contain more caffeine than the darker ones. maybe that is in the equation, too

That's not just Starbucks. The roasting process progressively destroys caffeine, so any coffee addicts who scream about how much they love dark roast for it's alertness powers are dumb.

Paul le Fou
12-10-2015, 12:35 PM
Overroasting is how chains and brands get a consistent flavor, from Starbucks to Folgers - they take whatever, mainly cheap stuff, and roast it all until it tastes the same. SB is a little better about this lately with more varieties and even single origin coffee, but the idea remains.

Paul le Fou
12-18-2015, 11:18 AM
I got my family some local beans, but I'm not sure my sister has a grinder so I might have to get them ground at the store. What I'm saying is, should I just disown my family or frame them for drug smuggling and get them locked up for life

Daikaiju
12-24-2015, 10:05 AM
Overroasting is how chains and brands get a consistent flavor, from Starbucks to Folgers - they take whatever, mainly cheap stuff, and roast it all until it tastes the same. SB is a little better about this lately with more varieties and even single origin coffee, but the idea remains.

Contrary to popular opinion, I find Blonde roasts are a lot smoother than Dark Roasts.

Shagohod
06-21-2016, 12:26 PM
I recently got a grinder and a French Press and it makes coffee so much better. I still use my drip coffee maker for the hot water, and it does that admirably.

It's great having coffee that is less bitter and more flavorful. I usually go medium price and get whatever Winco has in their bulk section, or Peet's coffee and some other fairly cheap whole bean options available at grocery stores and Target.

This last week I went to a coffee place and got some fancy coffee from a local place that imports. It's Provedencia from El Salvador and I can see why it costs more, though it's doubtful that I'll spend the money on it again. It is a way more complex flavor and has different flavor notes after swallowing, which I have never experienced in coffee before. It's more acidic than average, but I always use a little creamer so it balanced it out and made it great.


Coffee is good.

Paul le Fou
06-21-2016, 02:13 PM
I'm on the prowl for good decaf, because I now take prescription stimulants regularly and don't want to throw more caffeine at them.

I've had some pretty decent results. My local, Victrola, has a fairly nice decaf I made a bag of. I tried Vita's, too, which was okay. I'm currently working on a bag of Blue Star, which I found recommended online. None of them has been really astonishing, but we're still talking much better than your average Plain Coffee bean (caf or otherwise) here, so I'm not complaining too hard.

Also as far as I can tell when I make coffee at home even from different beans it kind of tastes the same, or it's so long between different beans I can't compare or notice the differences. Before I finish this bag I'm going to get two others and actually brew two or three side-by-side to do a real tasting because otherwise I'll never really know.

Kuma is supposed to have really good decaf, according to my coffee-snobbiest friend, but the place nearby that serves Kuma including decaf and also sells their beans doesn't have the decaf for sale. Get it together, Empire Coffee! Rargh! And the shipping from online is a little too high to make me feel like it's worth it.

Dizzy
06-22-2016, 11:55 PM
Pretty much abuse K-Cups of all kinds, Starbucks, powder beans, energy drinks, espresso shots, crack, cocaine — I'll lick it off the floor and shake my head real fast. There is no coffee snobbery, just get that shit into your system fast.

John
07-10-2016, 09:44 AM
I recently got a Toddy cold brew, and really like the results. I coarse grind Safeway coffee, 12-16 oz, and then let it sit for 18-24 hours. Out comes a thick syrup that I mix 1-3 ratio with hot water, typically the small cup size on my Keurig. It's pricy, because I bring the results to work, and end up going through a bag of coffee a week, but still way cheaper than any coffee shop.

Paul le Fou
07-10-2016, 12:21 PM
I recently got a Toddy cold brew, and really like the results. I coarse grind Safeway coffee, 12-16 oz, and then let it sit for 18-24 hours. Out comes a thick syrup that I mix 1-3 ratio with hot water, typically the small cup size on my Keurig. It's pricy, because I bring the results to work, and end up going through a bag of coffee a week, but still way cheaper than any coffee shop.

What's your water/coffee ratio? I typically use 1/3 by volume. I only ask because while cold brew always results in a concentrate to be watered down, mine's never been "a thick syrup" and I usually dilute at 1/2 when I drink it.



EDIT: Oh dang I didn't realize you're talking about an actual machine. Never heard of it before; cold brews are sometimes called toddies for some reason though your wording did confuse me. I always just use my french press. Or before that, a big old pitcher. So, what's the deal with that thing? how does it work?

John
07-10-2016, 03:12 PM
The Toddy's not a machine, just a specialized pitcher with filters and rubber stoppers. I put in a cup of filtered water, pour in half a bag's worth of fresh grounds, add 3 more cups of water. Then I grind and add the rest of the bag, and put in 3-4 more cups, enough that I can push down all the grounds with a spoon and make a boggy marsh. Then I let it sit for 18-24 hours, and drain it into the included carafe.

1/3 cup of the extract mixes with a cup of hot water and makes a smooth drink. It's not an actual syrup, but you can tell it's thicker than regular coffee. If you swirl it around the carafe you can tell it's got "legs" like a rich wine.

spineshark
09-06-2016, 12:15 PM
my roommate and i need a coffee machine

preferably cheap. but good is more important. i don't know what to look for, where to start, anything like that. i mean i've looked on amazon but there are like a million options

Paul le Fou
09-06-2016, 02:48 PM
How much do you like coffee? Do you just want something that pumps out caffeine in the morning, or do you get picky about tasting notes of birch, peanut and lavender? Do you grind your own single-origin honey-processed beans or just buy massive cans of Folgers?


A french press or a chemex might be a good solution for brewing more than one cup at a time (or just one cup), or a pourover cone with a serving pot beneath, or a large-sized clever dripper.

spineshark
09-12-2016, 03:48 PM
i appreciated that post, paul. thanks. i know i didn't follow up but i feel pretty middlebrow. like, i'm not a connoiseur, i'm not about to go buying expensive bags of artisan coffee or anything, but i have some standards.

anyway, i bought a french press after considering that we don't really have space in our shitty little kitchen to plug another thing into the wall and sit it on the counter. and we already have an electric kettle for boiling water

Paul le Fou
09-12-2016, 07:37 PM
Word.

French Press is a good machine. Useful, makes good coffee, classic for a reason. Only thing I don't like about it is it's kind of a pain to clean up. I like making pourover because you just take the filter out of the cone and toss it in the compost then wash the cone and you're done. Chemex is basically the same as a PO but the filters are different (and more expensive) so I'm not too interested.

I'm interested in a clever since you get a bit more immersion time with all the benefits of a pourover, but new coffee gadgets are low on my list right now.

They do taste different, too. I was skeptical, but my friends and I had a Science Tasting where we made the same bean in FP, PO and an aeropress. Pourover and aeropress were pretty hard to distinguish but French press tasted noticeably distinct from those. So it might be worth picking up another someday if you feel the urge growing. But in the meantime you've got everything you need right there!

Reinforcements
09-27-2016, 09:21 AM
French presses are nice and pretty versatile, since you can easily make 1-4 cups of coffee in a medium-sized one, plus you could strain tea and stuff (I have never done this, as I don't care about tea enough to buy loose leaf). Though I suppose a filter cone is the smallest possible thing, and you trade slightly less waste for an easier clean-up. French press coffee always has a bit of sediment in it too, if that bothers you. You also want a larger than standard grind for FP, so it helps to have a grinder at home or in your grocery.

I'd like to try Chemex, but I'm skeptical that it's worth the extra cost over regular filters.